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April 16th, 2008

Amid the research reviews and the musings on the state of academia, ScienceBlogs occasionally gives us some really useful information. Like step-by-step instructions for How to Ship Your Brain.
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Nicholas White was trapped in an elevator in New York City's McGraw-Hill building for forty-one hours. Watch a time-lapse video of his ordeal, as captured by a security camera, which no one was monitoring.
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Six Reasons to Visit Denmark, the World's Happiest Country. Here's one more.
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The Stupidest Business Decisions in History. None of these decision makers are going to starve, but they could have been much richer.
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10 Of The Coolest Hotel Suites In The World. One can always dream, right?
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Ten very different cello artists and bands who will change your perception of the instrument. Or at least put a little music in your day.
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12 Tips to Improve the Quality of Your Free Time. Because the value of your free time is already very high.
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Modern Marriage Proposals. The bar has been set incredibly high for those who want to get creative when popping the question.

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History
A Very Brief History of Chamber Pots

Some of the oldest chamber pots found by archeologists have been discovered in ancient Greece, but portable toilets have come a long way since then. Whether referred to as "the Jordan" (possibly a reference to the river), "Oliver's Skull" (maybe a nod to Oliver Cromwell's perambulating cranium), or "the Looking Glass" (because doctors would examine urine for diagnosis), they were an essential fact of life in houses and on the road for centuries. In this video from the Wellcome Collection, Visitor Experience Assistant Rob Bidder discusses two 19th century chamber pots in the museum while offering a brief survey of the use of chamber pots in Britain (including why they were particularly useful in wartime).

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video
A Tour of the New York Academy of Medicine's Rare Book Room
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The Rare Book Room at the New York Academy of Medicine documents the evolution of our medical knowledge. Its books and artifacts are as bizarre as they are fascinating. Read more here.

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