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Unexpected, Unwelcome Visitors

So I live in an apartment in a pretty reasonable neighborhood. But I get a constant flow of slightly weird people ringing my doorbell and wanting something, or being angry with me. Does this happen to everybody? Here's a rundown of some recent activity:

1. Oil Change Guy - a guy in overalls who knocked *and* rang my doorbell at 5:15pm, just after I'd walked up my stairs after returning home from work (had he been waiting around for me to come home?). I walked right back down the steps and opened the door. He wanted to sell me twenty oil changes at some local shop for the low-low price of $200. The deal was, I'd give him cash and he'd give me these vaguely suspicious-looking coupons. I agreed that it was a good price, but I really didn't expect to need twenty oil changes any time soon. And, too bad, I didn't have any cash on me. Plus: totally sketchy. He began bargaining, bringing the price down to $150, and finally to $80 -- and he wanted to walk with me to an ATM. His last line was, "That's only four bucks per oil change, bro!" I was forced to close the door on him.

2. Angry Marketing Lady - a lady in a business suit who rang my doorbell at 7am, angrily repeating the doorbell-ringing as I jumped to put on some halfway decent clothes. When I answered the door she said: "You're late! Jeez, I've been out here for ten minutes! This is not the way to start a marketing relationship." Now, I've never seen this lady before in my life, and I said something to that effect. She took another look at me -- with my bedhead and crumpled band tee shirt -- then asked, "Is this XYZ Produce Company?" I assured her that, indeed, I was not the one late for a marketing meeting with XYZ Produce Company. She left in a huff.

3. Blanket Dude - a gentleman who rang my doorbell at midnight and asked if he could borrow a blanket. (I nearly didn't answer the door, but figured he wouldn't be ringing it at midnight if he didn't need something.) I said, "You want to borrow it or have it?" He replied, "Have it." So I gave him a blanket, he made the sign of the cross, and he went on his way.

4. "The End is Nigh" Couple - a man and woman wearing matching beige suits and holding clipboards rang my doorbell at 2pm (while I was working from home). I had been getting these pamphlets through the mail slot for several days indicating that the world would be ending circa 2011, and encouraging me to buy a book that would explain what to do about it. (As I recall, the pamphlets had a lot of full-color illustrations of deer and other woodland creatures watching a nuclear blast in the distance.) When I answered the door, I found that this couple had been leaving them, and they were determined to speak to everyone in the neighborhood about this world-ending situation. The woman said, "Would you like to learn more about the End Times?" I had to close the door as she continued with her speech.

5. The Meat Salesman - this one actually happened back in the 90's, but it deserves a mention. I was living in Tallahassee with some school friends, and one evening this guy came to our door with a cardboard box filled with meat. Long story short, the guy claimed that he worked at some restaurant and had mistakenly ordered all this meat, and he had to sell it off pronto to avoid being fired. So his loss was our gain. He had a truck full of various kinds of meat, packed in these cardboard boxes and vacuum-sealed. My roommates proceeded to buy several hundred dollars' worth of meat from this entrepreneur. I declined. For what it's worth, the meat seemed okay and they did eat it all. I'm just not sure why anyone would want to buy hundreds of dollars of meat on a whim from a stranger.

So here's my question: who has come to your doorstep unannounced? Have you had any interesting scammers come by? Also: has anything good ever come from a random visitor?

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travel
The Real Bay of Pigs: Big Major Cay in the Bahamas
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When most people visit the Bahamas, they’re thinking about a vacation filled with sun, sand, and swimming—not swine. But you can get all four of those things if you visit Big Major Cay.

Big Major Cay, also now known as “Pig Island” for obvious reasons, is part of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. Exuma includes private islands owned by Johnny Depp, Tyler Perry, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, and David Copperfield. Despite all of the local star power, the real attraction seems to be the family of feral pigs that has established Big Major Cay as their own. It’s hard to say how many are there—some reports say it’s a family of eight, while others say the numbers are up to 40. However big the band of roaming pigs is, none of them are shy: Their chief means of survival seems to be to swim right up to boats and beg for food, which the charmed tourists are happy to provide (although there are guidelines about the best way of feeding the pigs).

No one knows exactly how the pigs got there, but there are plenty of theories. Among them: 1) A nearby resort purposely released them more than a decade ago, hoping to attract tourists. 2) Sailors dropped them off on the island, intending to dine on pork once they were able to dock for a longer of period of time. For one reason or another, the sailors never returned. 3) They’re descendants of domesticated pigs from a nearby island. When residents complained about the original domesticated pigs, their owners solved the problem by dropping them off at Big Major Cay, which was uninhabited. 4) The pigs survived a shipwreck. The ship’s passengers did not.

The purposeful tourist trap theory is probably the least likely—VICE reports that the James Bond movie Thunderball was shot on a neighboring island in the 1960s, and the swimming swine were there then.

Though multiple articles reference how “adorable” the pigs are, don’t be fooled. One captain warns, “They’ll eat anything and everything—including fingers.”

Here they are in action in a video from National Geographic:

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Pop Culture
The House From The Money Pit Is For Sale

Looking for star-studded new digs? For a cool $5.9 million, Top10RealEstateDeals.com reports, you can own the Long Island country home featured in the 1986 comedy The Money Pit—no renovations required.

For the uninitiated, the film features Tom Hanks and Shelley Long as hapless first-time homeowners who purchase a rundown mansion for cheap. The savings they score end up being paltry compared to the debt they incur while trying to fix up the house.

The Money Pit featured exterior shots of "Northway," an eight-bedroom estate located in the village of Lattingtown in Nassau County, New York. Luckily for potential buyers, its insides are far nicer than the fictional ones portrayed in the movie, thanks in part to extensive renovations performed by the property’s current owners.

Amenities include a giant master suite with a French-style dressing room, eight fireplaces, a "wine wall," and a heated outdoor saltwater pool. Check out some photos below, or view the entire listing here.

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

[h/t Top10RealEstateDeals.com]

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