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Toilet Paper Dispensers

Even if you enjoyed the previous post on Innovative Toilet Paper, you know a major drawback to using toilet paper as a decorating idea is that it runs out. But you can impress guests with a one-time purchase by installing a very different toilet paper dispenser. And there are a lot of them to choose from!

The Tube

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Tube Tissue Dispensers look like oversize tubes of glue or toothpaste. The crimped end is velcro, so you can load the roll. Then pull the paper out of the cap end as you need it!

Automatic Folder and Dispenser

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This "T-per" may be someone's prototype or personal homemade machine, since it doesn't seem to be for sale anywhere. With the touch of a button, it measures and folds a wad of paper for you. It may seem like a waste of energy, but it would be handy for someone with limited use of two hands. See a video of this contraption in action at Engadget.

iWipe

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Here's a way to recycle and old computer case and make your friends scratch their heads when they see your bathroom. This version uses a Mac SE. Tech Republic has instructions for making your own.

iPod Dock and Toilet Paper Holder

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Many people though the iCarta iPod dock with attached toilet paper holder was a hoax when it first appeared, but this is a real product. Charge your iPod while availing yourself of the facilities! Gizmodo wrote a review of the product. You can order yours from Amazon.

The RSStroom Reader

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It's a gadget for the bathroom that prints out your favorite RSS feeds from the internet directly onto your toilet paper. Unfortunately, it's a hoax. But after the iWipe and the iPod dock, it's easy to believe something like this could exist.

Industrial Wipe

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Low-tech toilet paper holders come in some strange and wonderful designs, too, like the Industrial Wipe TP Holder. This fits in well in a bathroom that has exposed plumbing. Despite the name, it works with all kinds of toilet paper.

Goth

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Speedcult has a variety of strange dispensers, including this lovely bat. They also have holders in the shape of tiki gods, skulls, and flames.

Metal Sculpture

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This delightful holder features a man reading a newspaper as he does his business on a metal pot.

Robot

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The Airyusha Robotan Toilet Paper Holder is made of heavy ceramic and feeds paper out of the "robot's" mouth. It is the only dispenser I've found that comes with a roll of paper, so that you can begin to use it immediately.

Novelty

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Plenty of normal dispensers come in novelty shapes to illustrate your personality, like a fishing reel dispenser, or a cat holding your roll. Almost any animal can be found in the same sort of design. eBay has a wide selection.

Vertical

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With all the strange and artful toilet papers holders available, the one I want seems rather plain. But this design makes the over/under argument a matter of history. It's less likely to attract mischievous cats, too.

See also:

Innovations in Toilet Paper

How to Use Toilet Paper

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Courtesy of Studio Segers
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Design
These Unique Benches Are Made From Yogurt Cups and Plastic Bags
Courtesy of Studio Segers
Courtesy of Studio Segers

When sent to a landfill, some plastic waste will sit there for centuries before breaking down. The Belgian design firm Studio Segers has found an alternative use for the plastic containers some people throw away by re-purposing them into innovative outdoor seating. This modular bench spotted by design milk is made from used yogurt cups, butter tubs, and plastic bags and is 100 percent recyclable.

Commissioned by the recycling company ECO-oh!, the H-bench consists of slender, plastic components. They come with or without backrests and are available in dark gray, medium gray, light gray, pastel green, pastel blue, and beige. Snap three of them together and you have a chair. Keep adding pieces to build a snug love-seat or a bench long enough to fit a crowd.

Recycled bench.
Courtesy of Studio Segers

The seat is designed to be customized to suit the user’s taste. Chair backs can face one way or alternating directions; the bench can feature multi-colored stripes or a uniform shade; one side can have seat backs while the opposite end is built for laying down.

The makers didn’t skimp on quality to make their product sustainable: The H-bench is made from plastics called polyolefins, which means it's durable enough to stay strong and vibrant even in harsh outdoor conditions. Get a closer look at the smart design in the video below.

[h/t design milk]

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iStock
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The Elements
Sit Down at a Periodic Table That Holds Samples of Every Element
iStock
iStock

The periodic table maps out the atomic numbers, electron configurations, and chemical properties of all the elements found on Earth (both in nature and in the lab). But have you ever wondered what a traditional periodic table would look like as a physical table? That’s the question Wolfram Research co-founder Theo Gray asked himself years ago, and the wooden Periodic Table Table was his answer.

As you can see in the video below from Reactions, the furniture piece he built at his office looks like something you might find in your dining room, albeit a little more educational. Its surface features dozens of wooden squares, each one etched with the information for a different element. Beneath each wooden panel, there's a compartment that contains a sample of that element from the real world.

Gray’s table includes straightforward examples of the elements, like a jar of mercury and a chunk of bismuth, as well as some more creative entries like an aluminum knee implant. The 2400-plus items in his collection have long since spilled beyond the table and onto his shelves. While many of the objects are stored within the table itself, in some cases, he has too many examples of one element to keep them in the same spot. Some, like the knee implant, are just too bulky to fit. Valuable elements like gold and dangerous items—like a radioactive bottle of the early 20th-century quack-medicine Radithor—are also kept in more secure locations.

Even Gray’s vast inventory reflects just a small slice of how we see the chemical elements manifested in everyday life. For more examples of where you can find elements in the world around you, check out this illustrated table.

[h/t Reactions]

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