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The Weekend Links

"¢ Here are 10 of the Strangest Sights in Google Street View. Now it's not Big Brother watching so much as, well, you? Check out The Map Room for more map-related fun. (Thanks Jan!)

"¢ Reader Jane sent in a link to this incredible product. As she put it, "it is amazing what Amazon.com will sell. If you got the $$ they have the item." Additionally, the user reviews makes this a classic.

"¢ You might have seen this, but for those who haven't: 30 Things That Should Never be Adapted to Film. Still, I KNOW you guys would go see the LOLCats movie. Don't even lie to yourselves!

The Scuba: a car that runs underwater. Take that, greenhouse gas!

"¢ This story from The Sun about a menacing gnome will scare you or excite you, but either way, seriously, what IS it?

"¢ From the AV Club, The Scandal of Olivia Newton-John: 12 surprisingly controversial Wikipedia pages. For PTI fans, I also hear they've finally opened back up editing on Kornheiser and Wilbon's pages as well.

"¢ Beware! People are watching you on the streets (see above), studying your reading habits, and listening to your conversations ... (Thanks to John for the links.)

"¢ Weekly dose of cute alert: If you are feeling blue, just click here for the best screen cleaner in the world!

"¢ We've talked about unfortunate facial hair in baseball, and so to tickle your fancy, here are some of the Worst Haircuts in Basketball History (via GorillaMask.net)

"¢ Absolutely amazing: 20 Incredibly Unconventional Hotel Rooms that will make you considering redecorating your own living space.

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"¢ Also from Jan, a list of the Most Unusual Books of the World. Pop-ups aren't just for kids!

"¢ Get ready, Flossers! Brett Savage is currently working on a Guns N' Roses quiz to whet your appetite for destruction. In the meantime, check out this vintage article from McSweeney's on the hilarious deconstruction of "Sweet Child O' Mine" by an editor.

Much love to everyone who sent in links this week ... please keep it up! Remember, pictures and shameless personal plugs are always welcome. Just send your stuff to flossylinks@gmail.com and gain a little flossy fame. Have a great weekend!

[Last Weekend's Links]

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History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

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holidays
Custom-Design the Ugly Christmas Sweater of Your Dreams (or Nightmares)
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iStock

For those of you aspiring to be the worst dressed person at your family's holiday dinner, UglyChristmasSweater.com sells—you guessed it—ugly Christmas sweaters to seasonal revelers possessing a sense of irony. But the Michigan-based online retailer has elevated kitsch to new heights by offering a create-your-own-sweater tool on its website.

Simply visit the site's homepage, and click on the Sweater Customizer link. There, you'll be provided with a basic sweater template, which you can decorate with festive snowflakes, reindeer, and other designs in five different colors. If you're feeling really creative, you can even upload photos, logos, hand-drawn pictures, and/or text. After you approve and purchase a mock-up of the final design, you can purchase the final result (prices start at under $70). But you'd better act quickly: due to high demand, orders will take about two weeks plus shipping time to arrive.

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