The First Time News Was Fit To Print: Volume XXX

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Every Monday, we venture into the archives of The New York Times to find the first time the paper covered various topics. If you have a suggestion for next week, leave us a comment.

National Review

October 14, 1955

national-review.jpgBuckley Starting Weekly Review
A November 5 start for a new conservative weekly journal of opinion, The National Review, was announced yesterday.

William F. Buckley Jr., editor and publisher, said that $290,000 capital had been raised from 125 investors and that $160,000 had been lined up in circulation and advertising.
* * * * *
Among regular features, he said, would be "a weekly survey of relevant misinformation and outright falsehoods published by the nation's most influential reporters and commentators." This will be conducted by Ralph de Toledano, author of Seeds of Treason.

Wayne Gretzky

July 6, 1978

Hockey Star, 17, Is Always Ahead of Himself
gretzky.jpgWith mock fear he asked if it was safe to walk the streets of New York. The joke was that Wayne Gretzky, now 17 years old, has been thwarting assaults since he began outclassing the big boys as a 5-year-old all-star player on a hockey team for 11-year-olds.

Now the slight center is skipping three years of junior hockey to join the Indianapolis Racers of the World Hockey Association with a seven-year contract worth $1.75 million.

"All the way up everybody said I'd get killed," Gretzky said yesterday of his accelerated ascent through the Canadian amateur system. "Now they say I'm gonna get killed next year in the pros. But I find as I go higher in the leagues, it's tougher but less dirty. There's more respect for each other."
* * * * *
Gretzky proudly announced he had just received his driver's license two weeks ago. His face fell flat when he was reminded he would have to apply for a United States license. "I get nervous at driving tests," he said.

Keep reading for Harry Truman, wireless internet and greenwashing.

Wireless Internet

April 3, 1996

At Stanford, a Class-Lab Friendly to Computers
stanford-mascot.jpg With a grant of $165,000 from the Charles E. Culpepper Foundation and $300,000 from Stanford, [head of the Curriculum Development Lab] Charles Kearns set out to build a classroom where computers would be a tool, not a dominating fixture. The cost, about $400,000, would be prohibitive for the typical public school, but Stanford experts say the design will help future architects plan schools.Last year the first prototype classroom opened in a basement with laptop computers and wireless Internet connections -- although the wireless system proved too slow and no one liked the basement. This winter, the current version of the classroom opened in its sunny new location.
* * * * *
[Professor of French] John Barson said the room was especially good for teaching foreign languages because of its audio-video capabilities. His French students have created language games, Web pages and signed onto the Internet to chat with students in France.

And, he said, he has not caught any students playing video games when they are supposed to be translating or noticed any of his prone students nodding off on a bean bag.

Greenwash

April 19, 1990

Some Smog in Pledges to Help Environment
recycle.gif On the bottom of the paperboard container that McDonald's uses for its hash-brown potatoes is the three-arrow symbol that generally denotes a product made of recycled material, and the words "Recyclable Paper." But McDonald's officials concede that the package is not made of recycled paper, is not being recycled and may not even be capable of being recycled because of a promotional label glued to the back.

"It's a little embarrassing," said Shelby Yastrow, McDonald's senior vice president for environmental affairs. "We're going to take the recycling logo off everything except what we are actually recycling."
* * * * *
Many other packaged-products companies are doing things like putting the three-arrows symbol on products and labeling them ''recyclable.'' But environmentalists point out that virtually everything is recyclable with enough time and effort. They say adding labels like "recyclable" and "degradable" is a cheap way of looking green without getting involved in the hard work of reducing solid waste.
* * * * *
The conflict between image building and actual practice was highlighted at a recent exhibit in Washington called "Earth Tech." At the exhibit, companies like Du Pont and USX emphasized efforts like the use of bacteria to clean up contaminated waste sites and materials conservation through recycling.
But some environmentalists said the exhibit was an attempt to divert attention from the pollutants these big industrial companies emit in the course of their operations each year. Peter Bahouth, director of Greenpeace U.S.A., denounced it as "a slick opportunity for some companies to greenwash their dirt."

Greenwashing

May 20, 2001

Uneasy Being Green: Tourism Runs Wild
Major hotel chains, cruise ships and megaresorts have been underscoring their earth-friendly practices of late. Some of these enterprises do a commendable job of protecting the local environment, said Martha Honey, author of Ecotourism and Sustainable Development: Who Owns Paradise? But others are engaged in "greenwashing," promoting themselves as earth-friendly simply because they have small showerheads or do not wash guest towels every day.

Harry Truman

May 20, 1934

harry-truman.jpgMissouri Political Leaders Have Already Selected Their Candidates [For Senate]
Tom J. Pendergast, head of the Kansas City machine, then turned to Harry S. Truman, presiding judge of the Jackson County Court. Truman accepted and the gage of battle was thrown down.

But within the past few days there has been a growing sentiment in favor of John J. Cochran, Representative from St. Louis. [Jacob L. "Tuck"] Milligan's candidacy did not strike much fire. Truman is little known and his only strength is that given him by Pendergast in Kansas City.

Our Archives

"¢ Volume I: Barack Obama, Microsoft, iPod
"¢ Volume II: Hillary Clinton, Starbucks, Donald Trump
"¢ Volume III: JFK, Microwave Oven, the Internet
"¢ Volume IV: Larry David, Drudge Report, Digital Camera
"¢ Volume V: Walkman, Osama bin Laden, Iowa Caucuses
"¢ Volume VI: Times Square, Marijuana, Googling
"¢ Volume VII: Lance Armstrong, Aerosmith, Gatorade
"¢ Volume VIII: Bob Dylan, New York Jets, War on Terror
"¢ Volume IX: Hedge Fund, White Collar Crime, John Updike
"¢ Volume X: E-mail, Bruce Springsteen, George Steinbrenner
"¢ Volume XI: RFK, the Olsen Twins, Digg
"¢ Volume XII: Jerry Seinfeld, Lee Harvey Oswald, Don Mattingly
"¢ Volume XIII: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Taxicab, Hippies
"¢ Volume XIV: Digital Watch, Prozac, David Hasselhoff
"¢ Volume XV: George Clooney, Golden Gate Bridge, Toyota Prius
"¢ Volume XVI: Woody Allen, The Titanic, The Beastie Boys
"¢ Volume XVII: New York Edition
"¢ Volume XVIII: Sports Edition
"¢ Volume XIX: TV Edition
"¢ Volume XX: Wrestlemania, Phil Knight, My Two Dads
"¢ Volume XXI: Books on Tape, Condoleezza Rice, Tina Fey
"¢ End of 2007: Greatest Hits
"¢ Volume XXII: John McCain, American Gladiators, Dianetics
"¢ Volume XXIII: Barbara Bush, Sports Illustrated, The Daily Show
"¢ Volume XXIV: "I Have A Dream" speech, Mitt Romney, Game Boy
"¢ Volume XXV: Randy Moss, Regis Philbin, Valentine's Day
"¢ Volume XXVI: Yoko Ono, Universal Health Care, Tom Coughlin
"¢ Volume XXVII: The U.S. Presidential Candidates
"¢ Volume XXVIII: Superdelegates, HD DVD, Spud Webb
"¢ Volume XXIX: Academy Awards Edition
"¢ November 3, 2007: Appearance on NPR Weekend Edition Saturday

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March 3, 2008 - 7:00am
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