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Pictures From Our Readers: Ill-Advised Business Names

The response to our second reader photo challenge was great, and we got a ton of hilarious submissions! We're posting most of them here, and all of them on our Flickr page. Enjoy!

Anatomically-inclined business names
We had so many submissions in this category, we were actually able to organize them by body part:

We received two pictures of Massachusetts liquor stores named "Bunghole," from Cody (above, in Peabody) and Sabrina (below, in Salem). According to Wikipedia, "a bunghole is a hole bored in a liquid-tight barrel," though it's been used as naughty slang since at least the 13th century (famously making an appearance in Dante's Inferno).

bunghole2.jpg

We also got two pictures of the same business, from readers Kati and Laura -- the unfortunately-named Analtech in Newark, Delaware. (I'm sure it's pronounced an-AL-tech, guys. Jeez, grow up!)
analtech.jpg

Jocelyn sent us a snap of Oregon's own T&A Supply Co., which judging from their name, keeps Nevada well-stocked with pasties and stripper poles.
T&A.jpg

This package store is just outside of Atlanta. (Thanks, Lucy!)
bigmanpackage.jpg

Furniture guaranteed to keep you up at night. (Heh. Sorry.)
morning_wood.jpg

Puntastic business names
The hair weaves in Pine Bluff, Arkansas are beyond belief. (Thanks to Darcie!)
unbeweaveable.jpg

This had to be intentional. Right? (From Josh and Joanna Burress, taken near Kokomo, Indiana.)
get_gas.jpg

Caroline Hanke sent in this picture of a really full-service gas station.
kum-&-go-fargo2.jpg

Unfortunate business names
From reader Katherine: tanning for the truly pale.
tanning.jpg

Kelly found this sign in southern Indiana. (Just because you own the place doesn't mean you have to name it after yourself.)
tom-raper.jpg

From Mindy, the least popular furniture store in Mason City, Iowa.
brick-furniture.jpg

Joe Warner writes that this business in Acworth, Georgia was torn down a few years ago. I guess the formula just wasn't working.
GUNSAMMOBBQ.jpg


Asian restaurants

There could've been thousands of pictures in this column, but we liked these three the best. From J.J. in Poughkeepsie:
Poughkeepsie_NY_Yeung_Ho_II.jpg

In Bath, Maine (thanks, Austin):
YumMee.jpg

Reader Christine pointed out this photo of San Diego's own Pho King (it's pronounced fuh), taken by the gourmands at mmm-yoso!
phoking01.jpg

There are lots of these places in Los Angeles, but apparently people in other parts of the world (like reader Tori) think that donuts and Chinese food make strange platefellows:
donuts.jpg

Just plain odd
There's really no other way to classify these. What were they thinking?

More weirdness from Darcie in Pine Bluff, Arkansas:
used-plants.jpg

Discount caskets? (I hope they're not used.) Thanks, Alyssa!
caskets.jpg

Sarah sent us this shot from Shreveport, Louisiana. She hoped this was a sign for an exterminator business, but needless to say, didn't go inside to investigate.
killer.jpg

Laura found this on vacation in Phoenix about 15 years ago. Cute!
shooting-supplies.jpg

Georgetown's own Moby Dick Kabob. (Say that five times fast.) Thanks to Luz.
moby_dick_kabob.jpg

On-purpose weird business names
When you have no marketing budget, sometimes the best way to get the word out about your business is by giving it a ridiculous name. We're pretty sure that's what happened to these fine establishments.

From Kevin:
stupidprices.jpg

A Phillipsburg, Kansas restaurant found by Alyssa:
frisky_biscuit.jpg

A guy who got tired of answering the question "what kind of stuff do you sell?" From Jocelyn:
stuffmart.jpg

More peculiarity from Pine Bluff:
super-bad.jpg

A frozen yogurt place in Salt Lake (thanks Devora), whose motto appears to be "no spooning on Sundays!"
spoon_me.jpg

Bars
There seems to be a long-standing tradition of giving bizarre names to drinking establishments. Here are a few.

Nothing special about this Lancaster, Ohio saloon (thanks, Sheya):
Just-Another-Saloon.jpg

Live nude cattle in Star Valley, Arizona. (Thanks, Susan.)
cabaret-cow.jpg

Both the name and logo of this business seem to celebrate drunk driving:
Drive-Trru-Biningers-Happy.jpg

Just around the corner from the Mormon temple in Salt Lake City (thanks, Jessica):
deadgoat.jpg

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travel
The Real Bay of Pigs: Big Major Cay in the Bahamas
iStock
iStock

When most people visit the Bahamas, they’re thinking about a vacation filled with sun, sand, and swimming—not swine. But you can get all four of those things if you visit Big Major Cay.

Big Major Cay, also now known as “Pig Island” for obvious reasons, is part of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. Exuma includes private islands owned by Johnny Depp, Tyler Perry, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, and David Copperfield. Despite all of the local star power, the real attraction seems to be the family of feral pigs that has established Big Major Cay as their own. It’s hard to say how many are there—some reports say it’s a family of eight, while others say the numbers are up to 40. However big the band of roaming pigs is, none of them are shy: Their chief means of survival seems to be to swim right up to boats and beg for food, which the charmed tourists are happy to provide (although there are guidelines about the best way of feeding the pigs).

No one knows exactly how the pigs got there, but there are plenty of theories. Among them: 1) A nearby resort purposely released them more than a decade ago, hoping to attract tourists. 2) Sailors dropped them off on the island, intending to dine on pork once they were able to dock for a longer of period of time. For one reason or another, the sailors never returned. 3) They’re descendants of domesticated pigs from a nearby island. When residents complained about the original domesticated pigs, their owners solved the problem by dropping them off at Big Major Cay, which was uninhabited. 4) The pigs survived a shipwreck. The ship’s passengers did not.

The purposeful tourist trap theory is probably the least likely—VICE reports that the James Bond movie Thunderball was shot on a neighboring island in the 1960s, and the swimming swine were there then.

Though multiple articles reference how “adorable” the pigs are, don’t be fooled. One captain warns, “They’ll eat anything and everything—including fingers.”

Here they are in action in a video from National Geographic:

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Pop Culture
The House From The Money Pit Is For Sale

Looking for star-studded new digs? For a cool $5.9 million, Top10RealEstateDeals.com reports, you can own the Long Island country home featured in the 1986 comedy The Money Pit—no renovations required.

For the uninitiated, the film features Tom Hanks and Shelley Long as hapless first-time homeowners who purchase a rundown mansion for cheap. The savings they score end up being paltry compared to the debt they incur while trying to fix up the house.

The Money Pit featured exterior shots of "Northway," an eight-bedroom estate located in the village of Lattingtown in Nassau County, New York. Luckily for potential buyers, its insides are far nicer than the fictional ones portrayed in the movie, thanks in part to extensive renovations performed by the property’s current owners.

Amenities include a giant master suite with a French-style dressing room, eight fireplaces, a "wine wall," and a heated outdoor saltwater pool. Check out some photos below, or view the entire listing here.

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

[h/t Top10RealEstateDeals.com]

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