6 Curious College Donations

You know how you have those friends who you always call by their entire names? Civil engineering grad student Katie Kelly is one of those people. On the plus side, when she donates lots of money to Princeton in the future and gets a bathroom, lake or horse stable named after her, the Katie Kelly Lakeside Bathroom for the Equestrian Arts rolls off of the tongue really nicely. -Stacy Conradt

6 Curious College Donations
by Katie Kelly

katie_logo1.jpg
Universities are always looking for cash from their alumni (or anyone else with a big enough checkbook). But sometimes colleges are offered donations of another variety. Here are stories of six rather unusual gifts given to universities across the world.

University of Colorado at Boulder

feld11.jpg

Endowing a school, building, or even a classroom with one's name is a pretty typical fundraising practice among universities today"¦ demanding a bathroom to commemorate yourself isn't quite as commonplace. Brad Feld, a local venture capitalist, donated $25,000 to the University of Colorado on the condition that a plaque would be placed on the door of a second-floor men's restroom in one of the campus' technology centers. He originally made the conditional offer to his alma mater, MIT, but was rejected. Feld, in an interview with Boulder's Daily Camera, states: "I just wanted a plaque outside of the men's room to inspire people as they walk in to do their business." Quite fittingly, the quote reads, "The best ideas often come at inconvenient times "“ don't ever close your mind to them."

Princeton University

carnegie-princeton.jpg
With an $11.2 billion endowment and a current plan to raise an additional $1.75 billion, Princeton knows how to bring in cash. But Andrew Carnegie's donation is a large liquid asset of a different type: a lake. Carnegie was a devoted philanthropist, founding libraries and universities in the United States and Scotland, and Princeton was eager to add their name to his list of lucky donors. While sitting for a portrait one day Carnegie regaled the artist, Howard Russel Butler, with tales of the lochs he had built in Scotland. Butler, an alumnus of Princeton University and its varsity crew team, described the crowded narrow canal that the team was practicing on and his plans to build an adjacent lake. Carnegie immediately took interest and undertook the project himself. At the dedication of Lake Carnegie, University president Woodrow Wilson (the future President of the United States) approached the donor, eager to involve Carnegie in funding new academic programs. Carnegie responded with disinterest, saying "I have already given you a lake." Wilson's reported response? "We needed bread, and you gave us cake."

Tufts University

jumboThe donation that P. T. Barnum made in 1889 dwarfs the small peanuts being donated to the University by recent college graduates. The great circus entertainer P.T. Barnum was one of the earliest supporters of Tufts, and he donated many of his deceased circus specimens to Tufts' Barnum Museum of Natural History, which he also contributed. Of all the exotic species he bestowed upon the college, his biggest (literally) and most impactful specimen donation was Jumbo the elephant. Barnum promised the skeleton of the 13-foot tall African elephant to the Museum of Natural History, and its hide to Tufts. Upon Jumbo's death, he was mounted and sent to live at Tufts. The students immediately took to Jumbo, and he became the school's mascot. However, tragedy struck in 1975 when Jumbo and the structure surrounding him, then known simply as Barnum Hall, was destroyed in a fire. Athletic administrators, desperate to keep a remnant of their beloved mascot, scooped up some of the ashes into a peanut butter jar which remains on the desk of the Tufts athletic director to this day.

Churchill College, Cambridge University

chapel11.jpg

Frances Crick (of DNA fame) had fundraising of a different type in mind for Cambridge University, intending to transition Churchill from leading the House of Commons to leading a house of ill repute. To honor former Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Cambridge decided to build a new college in his honor in 1960. Crick was offered a fellowship in the college, and the fervent atheist accepted on the condition that a chapel never be constructed in the college, believing that religion had no place in a serious institution focused on science and technology. However, when funding for the construction of a chapel was offered by a donor, the college agreed to proceed. Crick protested to Churchill, who responded that "none need enter [the chapel] unless they wish." Crick responded by saying that if that is the case, the college ought to build a brothel under the same grounds and even included a check for 10 guineas as his contribution towards such a business. Unfortunately for Cambridge students, Crick's facetious proposal was not accepted and he resigned.

Cal-Poly Pomona

ranch1.jpg
W. K. Kellogg, of cereal fame, was an avid fan of Arabian horses since his childhood. After starting his namesake company with his brother and earning millions of dollars, he purchased land in Pomona, California, to establish a world-class Arabian horse ranch. In 1932 he donated the ranch to the state of California, stipulating that the horses must be kept, along with the traditional Sunday horse shows to display the grace and versatility of the Arabian horse. When the property was transferred to the California State Polytechnic University at Pomona in 1949, the school agreed to uphold these terms. The Sunday shows continue today, performed by a student drill team on the first Sunday of each month, October through May.

University of Calgary

While light saber wars between students are routine at universities like Cal Tech and MIT, the University of Calgary lays claim to one of the largest collections of sci-fi material in the galaxy. When devoted sci-fi collector Bob Gibson died in 2001, his family had no idea what to do with his 30,000 piece collection - the boxes of books and magazines took up most of the house. His son, an alumnus of the University of Calgary, decided that the collection would be best preserved and shared by donating it to his alma mater. Thus, with the establishment of the Bob Gibson Collection of Speculative Fiction, the University of Calgary instantly became the home of one of the world's leading collections of science fiction.

Check out the rest of our College Weekend festivities.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Central Press/Getty Images
Ernest Hemingway’s Guide to Life, In 20 Quotes
Central Press/Getty Images
Central Press/Getty Images

Though he made his living as a writer, Ernest Hemingway was just as famous for his lust for adventure. Whether he was running with the bulls in Pamplona, fishing for marlin in Bimini, throwing back rum cocktails in Havana, or hanging out with his six-toed cats in Key West, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author never did anything halfway. And he used his adventures as fodder for the unparalleled collection of novels, short stories, and nonfiction books he left behind, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Death in the Afternoon, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea among them.

On what would be his 119th birthday—he was born in Oak Park, Illinois on July 21, 1899—here are 20 memorable quotes that offer a keen perspective into Hemingway’s way of life.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

ON TRUST

"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."

ON DECIDING WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT

"I never had to choose a subject—my subject rather chose me."

ON TRAVEL

"Never go on trips with anyone you do not love."


Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. [1], Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS

"Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

ON TRUTH

"There's no one thing that is true. They're all true."

ON THE DOWNSIDE OF PEOPLE

"The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness, except for the very few that were as good as spring itself."

ON SUFFERING FOR YOUR ART

"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."

ON TAKING ACTION

"Never mistake motion for action."

ON GETTING WORDS OUT

"I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast—talk them or write them down."


Photograph by Mary Hemingway, in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE BENEFITS OF SLEEP

"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?"

ON FINDING STRENGTH 

"The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places."

ON THE TRUE NATURE OF WICKEDNESS

"All things truly wicked start from innocence."

ON WRITING WHAT YOU KNOW

"If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one ninth of it being above water."

ON THE DEFINITION OF COURAGE

"Courage is grace under pressure."

ON THE PAINFULNESS OF BEING FUNNY

"A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book."


By Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. - JFK Library, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON KEEPING PROMISES

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

ON GOOD VS. EVIL

"About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after."

ON REACHING FOR THE UNATTAINABLE

"For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

ON HAPPY ENDINGS

"There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it."

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
4 Movies, 1 Thing In Common II
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios