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Mac Tips: Backup (Part 2)

Last week I covered backing up your Mac with Mozy -- a way to get your most important files backed up online for free. But because the free Mozy solution only stores up to 2 GB of data, you'll need to look elsewhere for a complete backup that covers your music, photos, and so on. You could pay a subscription for the Mozy full service, but this can get expensive over time -- and it can be very slow to upload tons of data over your home internet connection.

For Mac users, the obvious choice for full-drive backup is Time Machine, a new feature in Mac OS X Leopard. The ultimate "set it and forget it" backup, Time Machine uses an external drive (USB or Firewire) to back up your Mac's hard drive. It works in the background, waking up every hour or so to back up any newly changed files. It requires zero user intervention beyond attaching the backup drive. Setup is extremely simple: just plug in a new USB or Firewire drive to your Mac running Leopard, and you'll be asked whether you want to use that drive for Time Machine. Easy! Note: the initial backup will take some time...you may want to make sure your Mac is set not to fall asleep during this backup, so you can be sure to have a complete backup the first time. Later backups only copy what has changed, and usually only take a few minutes. All of the backups happen in the background, so you can continue to use your Mac while the backup is in progress.

To retrieve files from Time Machine, you can enter the crazy 3D Time Machine view (pictured above), where you zoom back in time to find specific files. A timeline on the right shows backups over time, so you can easily zip to a specific date and see what was in a given folder. Personally, I've never used this feature -- it's rare that I actually lose a single file or want to go back to an old version like this. (Though Apple seems to think this is a really zippy demo, so you'll see it in lots of online reviews.) But what I do use is the whole-disk restore feature: you can boot from any Leopard install DVD, plug in a Time Machine backup drive, and use it to restore your Mac's main hard drive. This is extremely useful in case your main drive dies and is replaced with a new one, or you want to clone your drive onto a new Mac.

Apple just released Time Capsule, which is an Airport Extreme wireless router with a built-in Time Machine backup disk (either 500 GB or 1 Terabyte [!]). This further simplifies backup, since you don't even have to plug in a drive -- it's available wirelessly. Also, Time Capsule is handy if you have a lot of Macs in the house and want to back them up to a single, central place without carrying a disk around. So if you need a wireless router AND you want to do Time Machine, check out Time Capsule. But if you just want to get started with Time Machine, an external disk (USB/Firewire) will be cheaper. Generally you want your backup disk to have at least 1.5x-2x more capacity than you're using on your Mac's main drive. Thus, if you're using 60 GB on your laptop's drive, you'll want your Time Machine backup drive to be in the 90-120 GB range, at minimum.

One thing to keep in mind: if your Time Machine backup disk is in the same location as your Mac, you could lose both of them in a disaster. So if your house burns down (let's hope it doesn't), you'd likely lose both your Mac and the backup. If it's possible for you to store the backup disk in some other location (for example, at work, if you bring a laptop back and forth), you'll have a bit more security. This is also why you'll also want to use a solution like Mozy to back up your most critical files online, thus hopefully protected from any disaster that might befall your Mac. By using this two-prong backup strategy, you'll be protected against a wide variety of possible problems.

Thanks for reading about backup! Windows users, please chime in using the comments if you have suggestions for Windows backup solutions. Also if anyone has a request for a future Mac Tip, please leave a note!

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Learn to Tie a Tie in Less Than 2 Minutes
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For most men—and Avril Lavigne-imitators—learning to tie a tie is an essential sartorial skill. Digg spotted this video showing how you can tie one the simple way, with a tabletop method that works just as well if you’re going to wear the tie yourself or if you're tying it together for someone else who doesn't share your skills.

The whole technique is definitely easier to master while watching the video below, but here's a short rundown: As laid out by the lifehack YouTube channel DaveHax, the method requires you to lay the tie out on a table, folded in half as if you're about to loop it around your neck.

With the back of the tie facing up, you loop over each end, then twist the thinner of the two loops around itself so it ends up looking like a mini-tie knot itself. You'll end up nestling the two loops together and snaking the thin tail of the tie through the whole thing. Then, essentially all you have to do is pull, and you can adjust the tie as you otherwise would to put it over your head.

Unfortunately, this won't teach you how to master the art of more complicated neckwear styles like the fancier Balthus knot or even a bow tie, but it's a pretty good start for those who have yet to figure out even the simplest tie fashions.

[h/t Digg]

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How to Spot the Convincing New Phishing Scam Targeting Netflix Users
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Netflix may send customers the occasional email, but these messages will never ask you to provide them with personal or payment info. You'll want to keep this in mind if you encounter a new phishing scam that The Daily Dot reports is targeting the video streaming service's subscribers in Australia and the UK.

MailGuard, an Australian email security company, was the first to take notice of the fraudulent emails. While similar scams have targeted Netflix users in the past, this current iteration appears to be more convincing than most. At first (and perhaps even second) glance, the messages appear to be legitimate messages from Netflix, with an authentic-looking sender email and the company’s signature red-and-white branding. The fake emails don’t contain telltale signs of a phishing attempt like misspelled words, irregular spacing, or urgent phrasing.

The subject line of the email informs recipients that their credit card info has been declined, and the body requests that customers click on a link to update their card's expiration date and CVV. Clicking leads to a portal where, in addition to the aforementioned details, individuals are prompted to provide their email address and full credit card number. After submitting this valuable info, they’re redirected to Netflix’s homepage.

So far, it’s unclear whether this phishing scheme has widely affected Netflix customers in the U.S., but thousands of people in both Australia and the U.K. have reportedly fallen prey to the effort.

To stay safe from phishing scams—Netflix-related or otherwise—remember to never, ever click on an email link unless you’re 100 percent sure it’s valid. And if you do end up getting duped, use this checklist as a guide to safeguard your compromised data.

[h/t The Daily Dot]

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