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January 21st, 2008

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Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Take some time to watch the entire I Have A Dream speech from 1963. You'll find a chronology of King's life here.
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A computer has decoded dog communication. Oh great, wait until the dogs hear about this; they'll be asking for steak and beer ALL the time!
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Experiences Beat Possessions: Why Materialism Causes Unhappiness. Someone will always have a better pair of shoes, but the memory of that summer at the beach is all your own.
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Bunnies in Prison is a collection of surreal animations about the misadventures of a couple of incarcerated bunnies. The site is in Japanese, but the videos have no dialogue.
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When gamers David and Elly got married, their friends designed a personalized video game for their wedding. You can watch it as they first played it.
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RoboPult. How to make a vision-guided fireball-throwing catapult out of an ordinary industrial robot. Fun for the entire family!
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Philosophy in a sequence of drawings. Kinda makes you feel small, doesn't it?
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Helicopter Parents. How to make sure your kids never learn to make decisions or deal with failure.

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Big Questions
What's the Difference Between Vanilla and French Vanilla Ice Cream?
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While you’re browsing the ice cream aisle, you may find yourself wondering, “What’s so French about French vanilla?” The name may sound a little fancier than just plain ol’ “vanilla,” but it has nothing to do with the origin of the vanilla itself. (Vanilla is a tropical plant that grows near the equator.)

The difference comes down to eggs, as The Kitchn explains. You may have already noticed that French vanilla ice cream tends to have a slightly yellow coloring, while plain vanilla ice cream is more white. That’s because the base of French vanilla ice cream has egg yolks added to it.

The eggs give French vanilla ice cream both a smoother consistency and that subtle yellow color. The taste is a little richer and a little more complex than a regular vanilla, which is made with just milk and cream and is sometimes called “Philadelphia-style vanilla” ice cream.

In an interview with NPR’s All Things Considered in 2010—when Baskin-Robbins decided to eliminate French Vanilla from its ice cream lineup—ice cream industry consultant Bruce Tharp noted that French vanilla ice cream may date back to at least colonial times, when Thomas Jefferson and George Washington both used ice cream recipes that included egg yolks.

Jefferson likely acquired his taste for ice cream during the time he spent in France, and served it to his White House guests several times. His family’s ice cream recipe—which calls for six egg yolks per quart of cream—seems to have originated with his French butler.

But everyone already knew to trust the French with their dairy products, right?

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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science
Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
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Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

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