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The Weird Week ending January 4th

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Hello Kitty Merchandise for Men

After adorning every product possible for women, Sanrio will soon begin to market Hello Kitty merchandise for men. The Hello Kitty logo for men will be changed slightly, with text in the place of the eyes and nose, and an emphasis on black instead of pink. The for-men products will go on sale in Japan next month, and later this year in the rest of Asia and the United States.

Big Panties Save the Day

big-underwear.jpgJohn Marsey and his cousin Darren Lines were frying some bread when the pan caught on fire. Water only made the grease fire worse, so Lines grabbed the largest thing he could find, a pair of his aunt's size 18-20 underpants, wet them in the sink, and threw them over the fire! Jenny Marsey said:

My £4.99 parachute knickers have come in handy for something. We've had a good laugh that they were a bit like a fire blanket.

Anti-Smoking Chief Breaks Ban on Day One

One of the very first documented violators of Portugal's new smoking ban in public places was caught on camera smoking a cigar in a casino. Antonio Nunes, president of Portugal's food standards agency, is charged with enforcing the new law, which bans smoking in restaurants and bars. Nunes said he wasn't aware that the ban included casinos.

Fruit Salad from One Tree!

71-year-old Manabu Fukushima has a lemon tree in his backyard that grows eleven different kinds of fruit! Fukushima, of Onga, Japan, grafted young saplings of different fruit trees onto the more mature lemon tree in order to enjoy the fruit sooner. He plans to further increase the varieties on the tree.

Surgery Saves Snake and Golf Balls

125_phython.jpgA couple in Australia took a 6 foot python they had found to the vet. X-rays revealed the snake had eaten four golf balls! Area residents sometimes put golf balls in their henhouses to encourage hens to lay eggs, which apparently also fooled the snake. After successful surgery to remove the balls, the snake named Augustus is recovering at the Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary.

Precious Purple Pearl Appears in Plate

George and Leslie Brock stopped in Dave's Last Resort & Raw Bar in Lake Worth, Florida for a bite to eat. In a $10 plate of clams, they found an iridescent purple pearl, an very rare find in Florida clams. At least one expert says the pearl could be worth thousands of dollars. The Brocks plan to have it appraised.

Russians Buying Rats for New Year

Chinese New Year begins February 7th, and will usher in the Year of the Rat. Russian pet shops are reporting a shortage of rats as people buy the animals as pets before the new year begins. Vets fear that many of these rats, given as gifts, may end up abandoned on the streets.

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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva
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Man Buys Two Metric Tons of LEGO Bricks; Sorts Them Via Machine Learning
May 21, 2017
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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva

Jacques Mattheij made a small, but awesome, mistake. He went on eBay one evening and bid on a bunch of bulk LEGO brick auctions, then went to sleep. Upon waking, he discovered that he was the high bidder on many, and was now the proud owner of two tons of LEGO bricks. (This is about 4400 pounds.) He wrote, "[L]esson 1: if you win almost all bids you are bidding too high."

Mattheij had noticed that bulk, unsorted bricks sell for something like €10/kilogram, whereas sets are roughly €40/kg and rare parts go for up to €100/kg. Much of the value of the bricks is in their sorting. If he could reduce the entropy of these bins of unsorted bricks, he could make a tidy profit. While many people do this work by hand, the problem is enormous—just the kind of challenge for a computer. Mattheij writes:

There are 38000+ shapes and there are 100+ possible shades of color (you can roughly tell how old someone is by asking them what lego colors they remember from their youth).

In the following months, Mattheij built a proof-of-concept sorting system using, of course, LEGO. He broke the problem down into a series of sub-problems (including "feeding LEGO reliably from a hopper is surprisingly hard," one of those facts of nature that will stymie even the best system design). After tinkering with the prototype at length, he expanded the system to a surprisingly complex system of conveyer belts (powered by a home treadmill), various pieces of cabinetry, and "copious quantities of crazy glue."

Here's a video showing the current system running at low speed:

The key part of the system was running the bricks past a camera paired with a computer running a neural net-based image classifier. That allows the computer (when sufficiently trained on brick images) to recognize bricks and thus categorize them by color, shape, or other parameters. Remember that as bricks pass by, they can be in any orientation, can be dirty, can even be stuck to other pieces. So having a flexible software system is key to recognizing—in a fraction of a second—what a given brick is, in order to sort it out. When a match is found, a jet of compressed air pops the piece off the conveyer belt and into a waiting bin.

After much experimentation, Mattheij rewrote the software (several times in fact) to accomplish a variety of basic tasks. At its core, the system takes images from a webcam and feeds them to a neural network to do the classification. Of course, the neural net needs to be "trained" by showing it lots of images, and telling it what those images represent. Mattheij's breakthrough was allowing the machine to effectively train itself, with guidance: Running pieces through allows the system to take its own photos, make a guess, and build on that guess. As long as Mattheij corrects the incorrect guesses, he ends up with a decent (and self-reinforcing) corpus of training data. As the machine continues running, it can rack up more training, allowing it to recognize a broad variety of pieces on the fly.

Here's another video, focusing on how the pieces move on conveyer belts (running at slow speed so puny humans can follow). You can also see the air jets in action:

In an email interview, Mattheij told Mental Floss that the system currently sorts LEGO bricks into more than 50 categories. It can also be run in a color-sorting mode to bin the parts across 12 color groups. (Thus at present you'd likely do a two-pass sort on the bricks: once for shape, then a separate pass for color.) He continues to refine the system, with a focus on making its recognition abilities faster. At some point down the line, he plans to make the software portion open source. You're on your own as far as building conveyer belts, bins, and so forth.

Check out Mattheij's writeup in two parts for more information. It starts with an overview of the story, followed up with a deep dive on the software. He's also tweeting about the project (among other things). And if you look around a bit, you'll find bulk LEGO brick auctions online—it's definitely a thing!

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Name the Author Based on the Character
May 23, 2017
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