Greatest Hits of '07: The Great Public Restroom Debate

As we near year's end, we're re-posting a few heavily commented-upon posts from earlier in 2007. Here's one of our favorites, from September. This post also inspired my all-time favorite negative comment (#12).

I've never been in a great public restroom. I was under the impression they were all basically disgusting, with varying levels of nastiness.

Apparently, I've been going in all the wrong places.

Cintas, a company that sells corporate restroom supplies, has been naming America's Best Restrooms since 2001. This year's winner: Jungle Jim's International Market in Fairfield, Ohio.

Considering my grocery store does not have public restrooms, I'm impressed. And that's just the outside.

junglejims.jpg
Here's the America's Best Restroom write-up: "Jungle Jim's International Market is approximately 300,000 square feet of shopping ingenuity - it has Amish food, a cheese shoppe, garden center, international cuisine, cooking classes and eight aisles of pet supplies to name a few. And in the heart of it all, you'll find that Jungle Jim's famous restrooms stop shoppers dead in their tacks. Talk about bathroom humor -- the entrance doors are actual port-o-lets. Unsuspecting shoppers patiently wait their turn until they see three or four people exiting. Upon opening the door they discover a gigantic, modern restroom within. Truly a luxurious port-o-potty - Jungle Jim's style!"

Here are some other bathrooms you'd be lucky to find across the country.

Waffle House of America
Lawrence, Michigan
Fifth Place, 2004
wafflehouse1.jpg"Guests are greeted with soothing piano music and your eyes are quickly drawn to the focal point of the room, a beautiful hand-painted vanity. The bathroom stalls have a crackled paint finish and even the toilet seats are hand painted with roses. A panoramic mural of painted clouds surrounds the stalls to complete the outdoor garden atmosphere. No expensive contractors of decorators turned this bathroom into such a treasure. It was lovingly created with help from craft magazines, Mom and ideas from the Discovery Channel."

Wall City Toilet
Boston, Massachusetts
Third Place, 2004
wallcitytoilet.jpg

"During ten years of development and engineering, Wall's team took onto consideration comfort, hygiene, accessibility, cleanliness and security, as well as quality and design. The result: the world's smallest footprint for a self-cleaning, fully automatic toilet. The ergonomic design and technological conveniences of Wall's automatic public toilet create and amenity that allows all individuals, regardless of disability, to meet their needs in an easy and efficient manner."

Yavneh Day School
Cincinnati, Ohio
Fourth Place, 2003
schoolbathroom.jpg "We used a picket fence/bird house theme. All items were donated by employees. A selection of potpourri , sprays and lotions are arranged on a charming shelf. The idea for the bathroom was from our elementary school principal, Dr. Susan Moore. It has picket fence wallpaper, a shelf with bird houses, a green mirror, flowers, and even a bird house light switch cover!"

Art Chicks
artchicks.JPGLouisville, Nebraska
Second Place, 2004
"The Art Chicks bathroom is always super-dooper clean and has all the things a 'chick' would need - great soap, hand lotion, double ply Charmin Bath tissue, feminine hygiene supplies, hairspray and, of course, a great mirror."

Lee Davis Texaco
Mechanicsville, Virginia
Fifth Place, 2001-02
leedavistexaco.gif "Both the men's and women's restrooms are decorated with a touch of warmth from home. Different from being the gas station type restrooms with plain walls, a sink and a toilet, we want people to feel at home and welcome. There are pictures on the walls and rugs on the floor. The women's bathroom has flowers and the men's bathroom has plants to make them more decorated."

University of Notre Dame, Main Building
South Bend, Indiana
First Place, 2002
notredame.gif"The restrooms in the Main Building have Stovax Victorian tile floors (imported from England). The main door to all restrooms is refinished in their original glory of stained wood. Interior partition doors are finished solid oak mounted to marble finished partitions. Drinking fountains are inside a partitioned portion of the restroom. Faucets on sinks are designer accented with chrome and brass. Counters are built in for diaper changing and/or for luggage/bags. The lighting is classical 1800s style lighting suspended from the ceiling in reflector bowls."

(Any Notre Dame students or alums care to weigh in? Should the bathrooms be on the campus tour?)

This might be a loaded question in light of the Larry Craig scandal, but have you ever had a great experience in a public restroom? Tell us about it, or nominate that john for next year's trophy.

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The World’s 10 Most Beautiful Metro Stations
T-Centralen Station in Stockholm, Sweden
T-Centralen Station in Stockholm, Sweden

Some of the most beautiful places on earth lie just below the surface. For proof, look no further than T-Centralen in Stockholm, Sweden, which has just been named the most beautiful metro station in the world by Expedia.

The travel site used Google Trends to analyze the most-mentioned metro stations in the U.S. and Europe, but Expedia ultimately chose the order of its top 10 list and threw in a couple of other hidden gems. Russia and Sweden frequently popped up in their research, so it’s no surprise that stations in those countries secured the top two spots on Expedia's list.

Dubbed “the blue platform,” T-Centralen is the main station of Stockholm’s subway system, and it’s also one of the most ornate. Royal blue flowers and plant patterns creep up cave-like walls, and another section pays tribute to the workers who helped build the Metro. It has been suggested that the color blue was chosen to help commuters feel calmer as they go about their busy days.

A section of T-Centralen
iStock

It was the first station in Sweden to feature artwork, which stemmed from a 1956 competition to decorate the city’s metro stops. Over the years, more than 20 artists have contributed their work to various stations throughout the city, some of which have tackled important social and environmental themes like women’s rights, inclusivity, and deforestation.

In second place is Moscow’s Kosomolskaya Station, which also has an interesting origin story. When the Metro started operating in 1935, it was designed to help promote Soviet propaganda. Kosomolskaya Station, named for workers of the Komsomol youth league who helped build the first Metro line, had marble walls with gilded mosaics, crystal chandeliers, sculptures of fallen leaders, and painted scenes depicting important moments in Russian history. “Unlike the dirty, utilitarian systems of many cities around the world, the Moscow metro drives through a former—but not forgotten—stage of history that sought to bring palaces to the masses,” Expedia’s report states.

Komsomolskaya Station
Komsomolskaya Station in Moscow, Russia

Most of the stations on Expedia’s list are in Europe, but three are in the U.S., including two in New York City and one in Washington, D.C.

Here’s the full top 10 list:

1. T-Centralen Station (Stockholm, Sweden)
2. Kosomolskaya Station (Moscow, Russia)
3. Arts Et Métiers Station (Paris, France)
4. The Wesfriedhof Station (Munich, Germany)
5. Toledo Metro Station (Naples, Italy)
6. Staromestska Station (Prague, Czech Republic)
7. Metro Center Station (Washington, D.C, USA)
8. Mayakovskaya station (Moscow, Russia)
9. Abandoned City Hall Station (New York, USA)
10. New York City’s Grand Central Terminal (New York, USA)

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iStock
India's Supreme Court Demands That the Taj Mahal Be Restored or Demolished
iStock
iStock

The Taj Mahal is one of the most recognizable monuments on Earth, but over the years it's started to look less like its old self. Smog and insect droppings are staining the once pure-white marble exterior an unseemly shade of yellow. Now, The Art Newspaper reports that India's Supreme Court has set an ultimatum: It's threatening to shut down or demolish the building if it's not restored to its former glory.

Agra, the town where the Taj Mahal is located, has a notorious pollution problem. Automobile traffic, factory smoke, and the open burning of municipal waste have all contributed to the landmark's increasing discoloration. Insects and acid rain also pose a threat to the facade, which is already crumbling away in some parts.

India's highest court now says the country's central government must seek foreign assistance to restore the UNESCO World Heritage Site if it's to remain open. Agra's state of Uttar Pradesh has taken some steps to reduce pollution in recent years, such us banning the burning of cow dung, which produces heavy brown carbon. In 2015, India's Supreme Court ordered all wood-burning crematoriums near the Taj Mahal to be swapped for electric ones.

But the measures haven't done enough to preserve the building. A committee led by the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpu reportedly plans to investigate the exact sources of pollution in the area, a process that will take about four months. The Supreme Court plans check in on the status of site every day from July 31.

Air pollution isn't the only factor damaging the Taj Mahal. It was constructed near the Yamuna River in the 17th century, and as the water gradual dries up, the ground beneath the structure is shifting. If the trend continues it could lead to the building's total collapse.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

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