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Eight (and a half) People Whose Jobs Actually Killed Them

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We've all made those offhand comments: "This job is killing me," "I'd rather die than go to work this morning," and my personal favorite, "This job is sucking my will to live." But sometimes people's jobs really do kill them. I'm not too worried about myself; there probably aren't a whole lot of freak writing accidents (fatal writer's block? Paper cut to the wrist?) But racecar drivers, rock stars, baseball players and jockeys are all rather hazardous professions that sometimes cause on-the-job deaths. So next time you compare work to dying a slow death, think about these guys and remind yourself that your job isn't so bad.

1. Frank Hayes, Jockey

Hayes got the last laugh when he beat 20-1 odds to win at Belmont Park in 1923. At least, he would have gotten the last laugh if he was still alive when the race was over. Hayes was not a jockey by trade - he was actually a stablehand who managed to talk the owner of a horse into letting him ride. Sweet Kiss, the horse, came in first, but Hayes had a heart attack and died during the race. He was strapped on to Sweet Kiss well enough that he stayed upright right across the finish line. Even though the horse was a proven winner, no one wanted to ride it after that, nicknaming him "Sweet Kiss of Death". To date, Hayes is the only deceased jockey to win a race.

2.Les Harvey, Guitarist

In May 1972, Scottish band Stone the Crows lost their guitarist Les Harvey during a concert when he was electrocuted by a microphone onstage. His hands were wet and the microphone wasn't grounded. This makes Harvey part of the 27 Club, which you can read up on in my previous post on curses that seem to be working.

3. Jane Dornacker, Traffic Reporter

jane.jpgPoor Jane Dornacker survived one helicopter crash in 1986, only to be killed by another one six months later. Dornacker was a traffic reporter for WNBC Radio in New York City. In the first crash, her helicopter landed in the Hackensack River and both she and the pilot were able to swim to shore. The second crash, however, proved to be fatal. The copter stalled in midair, plummeted, struck a chain link fence and ultimately ended up in the Hudson River. It sank in 15-20 feet of water, where she and the pilot were trapped for nearly 15 minutes. She died on the way to the hospital. The pilot survived. Before Jane's days as a reporter, she was a rock star, comedian and actress.

4. Ray Chapman, Shortstop

chapman.jpgImagine being hit in the head by a 100 mph fastball, no helmet. Yeah, not good. That's what happened to Cleveland Indians shortstop Ray Chapman on August 16, 1920, when he was beaned in the temple by a spit ball thrown by Yankees pitcher Carl Mays. He actually tried to walk to the clubhouse on his own, but collapsed before he could make it.

Surgery revealed that his brain was damaged on both sides - both from where the ball hit, of course, and also from when the force of the impact made his brain hit his skull on the other side of his head. Chapman died a few hours after the surgery. The 1920 Indians went on to win the World Series.

5. J.G. Parry-Thomas, Race Car Driver

Everyone knows about NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt's untimely death at the 2001 Daytona 500, but Welsh driver J.G. Parry-Thomas predated him by about 65 years. In 1927, Parry-Thomas was trying to break the land-speed record of 174.22 mph. Around 170 mph, a exposed chain on the car snapped, pretty much decapitating him. Although there are varying reports, from what I gather, he set a personal speed record but did not beat the world record.

6. Tiny Tim, Singer/Ukulele Player

Tiny Tim almost died on stage "“ he had a heart attack during a concert in Minneapolis on November 30, 1996. He had been warned earlier that year that his heart was in a very fragile condition and that he should no longer perform, but he kept playing concerts anyway. He died later that day at a local hospital after doctors had attempted to resuscitate him for more than an hour.

7. "Dimebag" Darrell Abbott, Guitarist

dimebag.jpgYet another musician who died on stage in recent years is "Dimebag" Darrell Abbott, Pantera's lead guitarist. Although it wasn't the job that actually killed him, it was the fame that came with being part of Pantera that caused a crazed fan to gun down Dimebag Darrell during a 2004 concert. The man who shot him was a paranoid schizophrenic who believed that the band could read his mind and was stealing songs from him.

8. Joe Burrus, Escape Artist

Before David Blaine, there was Joe Burrus. Burrus was an escape artist who idolized Houdini "“ fitting, then that he died exactly 64 years after his hero. On Halloween in 1990, Burrus was chained and handcuffed inside a clear acrylic coffin seven feet below ground. The coffin was topped with dirt, followed by concrete. The concrete had not quite filled the hole when suddenly it dropped by about two feet, making it clear that the plastic coffin underneath had broken. By the time rescue workers pulled Burrus out of his self-made grave, he was already dead. Hopefully David Blaine takes this lesson to heart.

Not quite "on the job" but worth a mention anyway:

8.5. Thomas Midgely, Jr., Inventor

Thomas Midgely, Jr., was a celebrated inventor and chemist, who, among other things, discovered Freon (that stuff used in refrigeration and air conditioning systems). When he was diagnosed with polio and left disabled in 1940, he just couldn't suppress his inventor's spirit "“ he built a pulley system to move him in and out of bed. Unfortunately, it was this system that did him in "“ he accidentally strangled himself with one of the cords.

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Animals
Fisherman Catches Rare Blue Lobster, Donates It to Science
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FRED TANNEAU/AFP/Getty Images

Live lobsters caught off the New England coast are typically brown, olive-green, or gray—which is why one New Hampshire fisherman was stunned when he snagged a blue one in mid-July.

As The Independent reports, Greg Ward, from Rye, New Hampshire, discovered the unusual lobster while examining his catch near the New Hampshire-Maine border. Ward initially thought the pale crustacean was an albino lobster, which some experts estimate to be a one-in-100-million discovery. However, a closer inspection revealed that the lobster's hard shell was blue and cream.

"This one was not all the way white and not all the way blue," Ward told The Portsmouth Herald. "I've never seen anything like it."

While not as rare as an albino lobster, blue lobsters are still a famously elusive catch: It's said that the odds of their occurrence are an estimated one in two million, although nobody knows the exact numbers.

Instead of eating the blue lobster, Ward decided to donate it to the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. There, it will be studied and displayed in a lobster tank with other unusually colored critters, including a second blue lobster, a bright orange lobster, and a calico-spotted lobster.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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Courtesy Murdoch University
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Animals
Australian Scientists Discover First New Species of Sunfish in 125 Years
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Courtesy Murdoch University

Scientists have pinpointed a whole new species of the largest bony fish in the world, the massive sunfish, as we learned from Smithsonian magazine. It's the first new species of sunfish proposed in more than 125 years.

As the researchers report in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, the genetic differences between the newly named hoodwinker sunfish (Mola tecta) and its other sunfish brethren was confirmed by data on 27 different samples of the species collected over the course of three years. Since sunfish are so massive—the biggest can weigh as much as 5000 pounds—they pose a challenge to preserve and store, even for museums with large research collections. Lead author Marianne Nyegaard of Murdoch University in Australia traveled thousands of miles to find and collected genetic data on sunfish stranded on beaches. At one point, she was asked if she would be bringing her own crane to collect one.

Nyegaard also went back through scientific literature dating back to the 1500s, sorting through descriptions of sea monsters and mermen to see if any of the documentation sounded like observations of the hoodwinker. "We retraced the steps of early naturalists and taxonomists to understand how such a large fish could have evaded discovery all this time," she said in a press statement. "Overall, we felt science had been repeatedly tricked by this cheeky species, which is why we named it the 'hoodwinker.'"

Japanese researchers first detected genetic differences between previously known sunfish and a new, unknown species 10 years ago, and this confirms the existence of a whole different type from species like the Mola mola or Mola ramsayi.

Mola tecta looks a little different from other sunfish, with a more slender body. As it grows, it doesn't develop the protruding snout or bumps that other sunfish exhibit. Similarly to the others, though, it can reach a length of 8 feet or more. 

Based on the stomach contents of some of the specimens studied, the hoodwinker likely feeds on salps, a jellyfish-like creature that it probably chomps on (yes, sunfish have teeth) during deep dives. The species has been found near New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and southern Chile.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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