Calling All Interns

We're in the market for new interns. Stacy Conradt and Andréa Fernandes "“ formerly InternStacy and InternAndréa "“ were superstars this semester, and they'll be sticking with us as staff writers.

This is certainly a big-shoes-to-fill situation. Which is why we're filling those shoes with more feet. For the upcoming semester, we have openings for intern writers & researchers, an intern PR maven, and lots of campus reps.

If you'd like to work for the 2,518th most popular website in the United States, here are your instructions...

Intern Writer/Researcher

Job Description:
You'll spend your semester brainstorming, researching and writing stories that will appear on mentalfloss.com, like Stacy and Andréa have been doing since September.
Interview Assignment:
1) Come up with three ideas for stories. Here are links to some of our greatest hits.
2) Turn one of those ideas into a fascinating article.
3) Come up with two ideas for mental_floss quizzes. See our quiz archive for inspiration.
4) Suggest one idea for a recurring column, like Andréa's 'Feel Art Again.' We probably won't ask you (or force you) to actually write it, but you never know.
How To Apply:
Email your resume and your answers to the above questions to floss.intern@gmail.com.

Intern PR Maven

Job Description:
Work with us to improve that 2,518 ranking and increase overall awareness of mental_floss. This will include a decent amount of online research and making contacts at other thriving sites. Plus plenty of brainstorming for story ideas, giveaways, contests, etc.

Interview Assignment:
1) If you were planning a mental_floss event on your campus, what would it be called and where would you hold it? How would you make sure people attended and had a good time?
2) Pretend you've written some fascinating story (you can make up the topic, and pick an actual article from out there in the blogosphere), and convince us we should talk about it on mentalfloss.com.
How To Apply:
Email your resume and your answers to the above questions to floss.intern.pr@gmail.com.

[Writers/Researchers and PR Mavens should be willing to perform your duties for either college credit or a small stipend. You don't necessarily need to be a college student, though you must be willing to work on the cheap.]

mental_floss campus_reps

Job Description:
For pride, resume enhancement, some free t-shirts and perhaps a small budget for events, you'll introduce your school to the wonderful world of mental_floss. (But mostly for pride.) We're not yet sure what this means. Organizing trivia challenges at local bars or coffee houses? Handing out copies of the magazine?

Interview Assignment:
1) Figure out this whole campus_reps idea. What would you do if you were representing mental_floss at your school? (We'll do some thinking on it, too.)

How To Apply:
Email your resume and your answer to the above questions to MFcampusreps@gmail.com.

A few quick notes before we let the games begin:

1. We'll give you until the end of next week (December 21st) to apply, and our new interns should be available to start in early January.

2. Our interns can work from anywhere. We don't have much room in our NY office anyway.

3. While Stacy, Andréa and former intern Jason Plautz all made the jump from intern to contributor, that's not a given. We've been lucky that none of them turned out to be crazy. But if you're good, we'll happily ask you to stick around.

4. If you have other skills you think would work in an intern capacity -- fact-checking, copy editing, knowledge of WordPress, ergonomics expertise, patience with our nonsensical ideas for side projects -- we're happy to consider you as well. Send those pitches to flossytees@gmail.com.

5. You should not be difficult to work with. This is probably the most important rule. Any sign of diva-ness will derail your candidacy.

6. And thanks to reader Kevin B. for suggesting we use a photo of Kenneth, the NBC Page on 30 Rock.

Looking forward to reading your submissions! Any questions, you can leave a comment or email me. It's Jason -at- mentalfloss -dot- com.

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College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
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One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

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North America: East or West Coast?
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