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8 Awesome Videogame Quilts

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I love the concept of combining the old and the new. Quilting is an oh-so-useful craft that goes back hundreds of years. Recycling scraps of fabric to make a sturdy bedcover has been elevated to an art form. It seems anachronistic at first glance, but 8-bit pixelated arcade game icons lend themselves well to the design of patchwork quilts.

1. Galaga Quilt
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Emily at Carolina Patchworks made this quilt depicting the arcade game Galaga. It's for sale at Etsy.

2. Quiltbert

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Lenore at Evil Mad Scientist adapted the traditional "tumbling blocks" quilt pattern and made a pieced quilt based on the videogame Q*bert!

3. Mega Man

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Mega Man is just one of Punzie's videogame designs for quilts and pillows. You can buy them through her Etsy store, Rapunzel's Tower, but she connot guarantee Christmas delivery on new orders now.

4. Pacman

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The maker of this Pacman quilt posted at Kotaku isn't identified, but you can click for a closer view at the site. It seems to be a counted cross-stitch project!

5. Super Mario

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Marie at DIY-namite made this Super Mario quilt from two-inch squares ...a lot of them. She shares the instructions in two parts, here and here. See more pictures of the project at Flickr.

6. Mario mushroom quilt

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Flickr user 3j0hn pieced together two-inch squares to make a Mario Mushroom quilt!

7. Space Invaders

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Here you see Craftster rainbowmeow working on her Space Invaders quilt. It was her first quilt, and turned out wonderfully.

8. Zelda quilt

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Quilters are not limited to 8-bit icons! This awesome Zelda Wind Waker wallhanging was quilted by AGiES' mother over several months. She even hand-dyed some of the fabrics!

If anyone knows of a World of Warcraft quilt, I'd like to see it!

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Big Questions
Why Do Baseball Managers Wear Uniforms?
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Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Basketball and hockey coaches wear business suits on the sidelines. Football coaches wear team-branded shirts and jackets and often ill-fitting pleated khakis. Why are baseball managers the only guys who wear the same outfit as their players?

According to John Thorn, the official historian of Major League Baseball since 2011, it goes back to the earliest days of the game. Back then, the person known as the manager was the business manager: the guy who kept the books in order and the road trips on schedule. Meanwhile, the guy we call the manager today, the one who arranges the roster and decides when to pull a pitcher, was known as the captain. In addition to managing the team on the field, he was usually also on the team as a player. For many years, the “manager” wore a player’s uniform simply because he was a player. There were also a few captains who didn’t play for the team and stuck to making decisions in the dugout, and they usually wore suits.

With the passing of time, it became less common for the captain to play, and on most teams they took on strictly managerial roles. Instead of suits proliferating throughout America’s dugouts, though, non-playing captains largely hung on to the tradition of wearing a player's uniform. By the early to mid 20th century, wearing the uniform was the norm for managers, with a few notable exceptions. The Philadelphia Athletics’s Connie Mack and the Brooklyn Dodgers’s Burt Shotton continued to wear suits and ties to games long after it fell out of favor (though Shotton sometimes liked to layer a team jacket on top of his street clothes). Once those two retired, it’s been uniforms as far as the eye can see.

The adherence to the uniform among managers in the second half of the 20th century leads some people to think that MLB mandates it, but a look through the official major league rules [PDF] doesn’t turn up much on a manager’s dress. Rule 1.11(a) (1) says that “All players on a team shall wear uniforms identical in color, trim and style, and all players’ uniforms shall include minimal six-inch numbers on their backs" and rule 2.00 states that a coach is a "team member in uniform appointed by the manager to perform such duties as the manager may designate, such as but not limited to acting as base coach."

While Rule 2.00 gives a rundown of the manager’s role and some rules that apply to them, it doesn’t specify that they’re uniformed. Further down, Rule 3.15 says that "No person shall be allowed on the playing field during a game except players and coaches in uniform, managers, news photographers authorized by the home team, umpires, officers of the law in uniform and watchmen or other employees of the home club." Again, nothing about the managers being uniformed.

All that said, Rule 2.00 defines the bench or dugout as “the seating facilities reserved for players, substitutes and other team members in uniform when they are not actively engaged on the playing field," and makes no exceptions for managers or anyone else. While the managers’ duds are never addressed anywhere else, this definition does seem to necessitate, in a roundabout way, that managers wear a uniform—at least if they want to have access to the dugout. And, really, where else would they sit?

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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This Just In
Mattel Unveils New Uno Edition for Colorblind Players
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Mattel

On the heels of International Colorblind Awareness Day, Mattel, which owns Uno, announced it would be unveiling a colorblind-friendly edition of the 46-year-old card game.

The updated deck is a collaboration with ColorADD, a global organization for colorblind accessibility and education. In place of its original color-dependent design, this new Uno will feature a small symbol next to each card's number that corresponds with its intended primary color.

As The Verge points out, Mattel is not actually the first to invent a card game for those with colorblindness. But this inclusive move is still pivotal: According to Fast Co. Design, Uno is currently the most popular noncollectible card game in the world. And with access being extended to the 350 million people globally and 13 million Americans who are colorblind, the game's popularity is sure to grow.

Mattel unveils color-friendly Uno deck
Mattel

[h/t: The Verge

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