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8 Unique Magazines I Just Learned About

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Despite the Internet age, print publications are still thriving. The magazine racks in stores are filled with a plethora of publications in certain categories (teen, fashion, men's, news, gossip), but other topics are a little more"¦ unusual. After scouring newsstands and trawling the 'net, I'm proud to present 8 really unique magazines.

1. The Magazine for the Blind: Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind

The Ziegler is a 100-year-old monthly that's distributed for free to legally blind people around the world. Published in four formats (contracted braille, cassette, online, and e-mail), the magazine reprints articles culled from 4 national newspapers and 30 magazines. Matilda Ziegler was the benefactress of the magazine; the brilliant idea was conceived by a man named Walter G. Holmes.

2. The Magazine for Haters: The Miserablist

Miserablist.jpg

With the motto "Because Life is S%^," The Miserablist is for those who are anti- everything. The first issue of the student-designed concept magazine won the Magazine Academy competition held by the Periodicals Training Council (UK) and, as the winner, will be printed and distributed. Articles include "Sex is Rubbish" and "I Hate Festivals."

6 more after the jump.

3. The Scented Magazine: LEMON

LEMON.jpgWhile odors waft from the pages of most magazines, the scent of LEMON is not the result of advertisements. The twice-yearly magazine, which blends 60s/70s pop with "21st century hyper-culture," contains specially formatted inserts that "exude the scent of citrus." Adding to the mag's unique take on ubiquitous magazine features is its music coverage, which is done in graphic-novel format, "rendering musicians as comic book heroes."

4. The Oldest Magazine Still in Print: The Scots Magazine

Scots.jpgFirst published in 1739, The Scots has since grown to be the world's most widely read Scottish interest publication. The monthly mag features "the country, the people, the culture" of Scotland with articles on mull weavers, Dumfries races, and golfing. Originally a 48-page news pamphlet, the magazine actually ceased publication at least once, and also changed hands, which leads to some debate over its title as "oldest magazine in continuous publication."

5. The Lost & Found of Magazines: FOUND Magazine

FOUND.jpgA single note discovered on a car windshield spurred an idea that snowballed into FOUND Magazine, Dirty FOUND, books, tours, and a website. The magazine appears on newsstands only once a year, but when it does appear, it's packed with all things found: letters, cards, homework, lists, tickets, napkins, doodles, photos, and more. The more risqué finds appear in the sister mag Dirty FOUND.

5. The Most Ad-Heavy Magazine: Lürzer's Archive

Luerzers Archive.jpgMany readers bemoan the high ad content of popular magazines, but the readers of Lürzer's Archive are actually pleased to find their magazine filled with ads. Why? Lürzer's is a bi-monthly archive of "the best new print campaigns worldwide." Featuring spreads of said ad campaigns, the archive also includes some commentary as well as actual paid advertisements (mostly for designers and photographers). Ringing up at approximately $15/issue, the hefty tomes are also some of the more expensive magazines on the stands.

7. The Magazine for Proud Alcoholics: Modern Drunkard

Modern Drunkard.jpgThis magazine lacks a regular publication schedule, although subscriptions are available. Modern Drunkard has been "standing up for your right to get falling down drunk since 1996" and is staffed by a group of "functional alcoholics." The office includes a bar; typos are common because the proof-readers are "enthusiastic drinkers." Modern Drunkard's layout is modeled after that of men's adventure magazines from the 1950s.

8. The Sneaker Magazine: SNEAKER FREAKER

SNKR FRKR.jpgFour years old, SNEAKER FREAKER was the first international sneaker magazine. It's produced only twice a year, but is available in approximately 25 countries. The magazine covers sneakers, sneakers, and the political climate in Central America sneakers. Plus, anything else sneaker-related. Surprisingly, the magazine contains only a few ads per issue, which is a large part of why each issue costs around $9.

>>Know of any great ones we missed? Predator X-treme? Pro Bull Rider? Be sure to leave 'em in the comments.

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Space
Can’t See the Eclipse in Person? Watch NASA’s 360° Live Stream
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Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images

Depending on where you live, the historic eclipse on August 21 might not look all that impressive from your vantage point. You may be far away from the path of totality, or stuck with heartbreakingly cloudy weather. Maybe you forgot to get your eclipse glasses before they sold out, or can't get away from your desk in the middle of the day.

But fear not. NASA has you covered. The space agency is live streaming a spectacular 4K-resolution 360° live video of the celestial phenomenon on Facebook. The livestream started at 12 p.m. Eastern Time and includes commentary from NASA experts based in South Carolina. It will run until about 4:15 ET.

You can watch it below, on NASA's Facebook page, or on the Facebook video app.

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Art
Cephalopod Fossil Sketch in Australia Can Be Seen From Space

Australia is home to some of the most singular creatures alive today, but a new piece of outdoor art pays homage to an organism that last inhabited the continent 65 million years ago. As the Townsville Bulletin reports, an etching of a prehistoric ammonite has appeared in a barren field in Queensland.

Ammonites are the ancestors of the cephalopods that currently populate the world’s oceans. They had sharp beaks, dexterous tentacles, and spiraling shells that could grow more than 3 feet in diameter. The inland sea where the ammonites once thrived has since dried up, leaving only fossils as evidence of their existence. The newly plowed dirt mural acts as a larger-than-life reminder of the ancient animals.

To make a drawing big enough to be seen from space, mathematician David Kennedy plotted the image into a path consisting of more than 600 “way points.” Then, using a former War World II airfield as his canvas, the property’s owner Rob Ievers plowed the massive 1230-foot-by-820-foot artwork into the ground with his tractor.

The project was funded by Soil Science Australia, an organization that uses soil art to raise awareness of the importance of farming. The sketch doubles as a paleotourist attraction for the local area, which is home to Australia's "dinosaur trail" of museums and other fossil-related attractions. But to see the craftsmanship in all its glory, visitors will need to find a way to view it from above.

[h/t Townsville Bulletin]

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