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8 Unique Magazines I Just Learned About

Despite the Internet age, print publications are still thriving. The magazine racks in stores are filled with a plethora of publications in certain categories (teen, fashion, men's, news, gossip), but other topics are a little more"¦ unusual. After scouring newsstands and trawling the 'net, I'm proud to present 8 really unique magazines.

1. The Magazine for the Blind: Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind

The Ziegler is a 100-year-old monthly that's distributed for free to legally blind people around the world. Published in four formats (contracted braille, cassette, online, and e-mail), the magazine reprints articles culled from 4 national newspapers and 30 magazines. Matilda Ziegler was the benefactress of the magazine; the brilliant idea was conceived by a man named Walter G. Holmes.

2. The Magazine for Haters: The Miserablist

Miserablist.jpg

With the motto "Because Life is S%^," The Miserablist is for those who are anti- everything. The first issue of the student-designed concept magazine won the Magazine Academy competition held by the Periodicals Training Council (UK) and, as the winner, will be printed and distributed. Articles include "Sex is Rubbish" and "I Hate Festivals."

6 more after the jump.

3. The Scented Magazine: LEMON

LEMON.jpgWhile odors waft from the pages of most magazines, the scent of LEMON is not the result of advertisements. The twice-yearly magazine, which blends 60s/70s pop with "21st century hyper-culture," contains specially formatted inserts that "exude the scent of citrus." Adding to the mag's unique take on ubiquitous magazine features is its music coverage, which is done in graphic-novel format, "rendering musicians as comic book heroes."

4. The Oldest Magazine Still in Print: The Scots Magazine

Scots.jpgFirst published in 1739, The Scots has since grown to be the world's most widely read Scottish interest publication. The monthly mag features "the country, the people, the culture" of Scotland with articles on mull weavers, Dumfries races, and golfing. Originally a 48-page news pamphlet, the magazine actually ceased publication at least once, and also changed hands, which leads to some debate over its title as "oldest magazine in continuous publication."

5. The Lost & Found of Magazines: FOUND Magazine

FOUND.jpgA single note discovered on a car windshield spurred an idea that snowballed into FOUND Magazine, Dirty FOUND, books, tours, and a website. The magazine appears on newsstands only once a year, but when it does appear, it's packed with all things found: letters, cards, homework, lists, tickets, napkins, doodles, photos, and more. The more risqué finds appear in the sister mag Dirty FOUND.

5. The Most Ad-Heavy Magazine: Lürzer's Archive

Luerzers Archive.jpgMany readers bemoan the high ad content of popular magazines, but the readers of Lürzer's Archive are actually pleased to find their magazine filled with ads. Why? Lürzer's is a bi-monthly archive of "the best new print campaigns worldwide." Featuring spreads of said ad campaigns, the archive also includes some commentary as well as actual paid advertisements (mostly for designers and photographers). Ringing up at approximately $15/issue, the hefty tomes are also some of the more expensive magazines on the stands.

7. The Magazine for Proud Alcoholics: Modern Drunkard

Modern Drunkard.jpgThis magazine lacks a regular publication schedule, although subscriptions are available. Modern Drunkard has been "standing up for your right to get falling down drunk since 1996" and is staffed by a group of "functional alcoholics." The office includes a bar; typos are common because the proof-readers are "enthusiastic drinkers." Modern Drunkard's layout is modeled after that of men's adventure magazines from the 1950s.

8. The Sneaker Magazine: SNEAKER FREAKER

SNKR FRKR.jpgFour years old, SNEAKER FREAKER was the first international sneaker magazine. It's produced only twice a year, but is available in approximately 25 countries. The magazine covers sneakers, sneakers, and the political climate in Central America sneakers. Plus, anything else sneaker-related. Surprisingly, the magazine contains only a few ads per issue, which is a large part of why each issue costs around $9.

>>Know of any great ones we missed? Predator X-treme? Pro Bull Rider? Be sure to leave 'em in the comments.

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9 Things You Should Keep in Mind Around Someone Observing Ramadan
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To mark the ninth (and most holy) month in the Islamic calendar, Muslims around the world observe Ramadan. Often compared to Lent in Christianity and Yom Kippur in Judaism, Ramadan is all about restraint. For one month, Muslims observing Ramadan fast during the day and then feast at night.

By abstaining from food and water (as well as sex, smoking, fighting, etc.) during daylight, Muslims strive to practice discipline, instill gratitude for what they have, and draw closer to Allah. To be respectful and not annoy observers, here are nine things you should never say or do to someone observing Ramadan.

1. DON'T JOKE ABOUT WEIGHT LOSS.

A traditional iftar meal.
A traditional iftar meal.
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Although it might be tempting to joke about Ramadan being a good excuse to lose weight, it is a time for spiritual reflection and is a serious matter. Observers undertake the challenge of fasting for religious and spiritual reasons rather than aesthetic ones. And, once the sun sets each night, many Muslims prepare a hearty iftar (the meal that breaks the fast) of dates, curries, rice dishes, and other delicious foods. The suhoor (the pre-dawn meal) is often fresh fruit, bread, cheese, and dishes that are high in fiber and complex carbohydrates. So the idea of a cleanse is pretty far from their minds.

2. DON'T MAKE ASSUMPTIONS.

An Indian Muslim student recites from the Quran in a classroom during the holy month of Ramadan.
NOAH SEELAM, AFP/Getty Images

There are approximately 1.8 billion Muslims around the world, but not all of them observe Ramadan the same way. Although most observant Muslims fast for Ramadan, don't assume that every Muslim you meet has the same methods, traditions, and attitudes towards fasting. For some, Ramadan is more about prayer, reading the Qur'an, and performing acts of charity than merely about forgoing food and drink. And for those who may be exempted from the daily fasting, such as pregnant or nursing women, the elderly, or those with various health conditions, they might not appreciate the reminder from nosey busy-bodies that they aren't participating in the traditional way.

3. SAY "RAMADAN MUBARAK" INSTEAD OF "HAPPY RAMADAN."

A sign which reads
A sign which reads "Ramadan Kareem" in Arabic is seen pictured in front of the Burj Khalifa in downtown Dubai.
GIUSEPPE CACACE, AFP/Getty Images

Rather than wishing someone a happy Ramadan, being more thoughtful with your choice of words can show that you understand and respect the sanctity of their holy month. Saying "Ramadan Mubarak" or "Ramadan Kareem" are the traditional ways to impart warm wishes—they both convey the generosity and blessings associated with the month. The actual party comes after Ramadan, when Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr, an up to three-day festival that involves plenty of food, time with family, and gifts.

4. DON'T BE A FOOD PUSHER.

Muslim woman saying no to an apple.
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Even if the idea of not eating or drinking all day might be unfathomable to you, don't push food onto anyone observing Ramadan. While fasting all day for a month can cause mild fatigue, dehydration, and dizziness, don't try to convince participating Muslims to eat or drink something—they are fully aware of any side effects they may feel throughout the day. Instead, be respectful of their decision to fast and offer to lend a hand with something like chores, errands, or anything unrelated to food.

5. ACCEPT THAT WATER ISN'T ON THE MENU.

Dates and a glass of water.
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Muslims who observe Ramadan don't sip any liquids during daytime. No water, coffee, tea, or juice. Zilch. Going without water is even harder than going without food, so be aware of the struggle and accept it. It's all part of the sacrifice and self-discipline inherent in Ramadan.

6. RESPECT PEOPLE'S PRIVACY.

Pregnant woman doing yoga.
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Some Muslims choose not to fast during Ramadan for medical or other personal reasons, and they may not appreciate being badgered with questions about why they may be eating or drinking rather than fasting. Children and the elderly generally don't fast all day, and people who are sick are exempt from fasting. Other conditions that preclude fasting during Ramadan are pregnancy, breastfeeding, and menstruation (although, if possible, people generally make up the days later).

7. BE MINDFUL OF ENERGY LEVELS.

Woman running on the beach.
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Eschewing food and drink for hours at a time can cause lethargy, so be aware that Muslims observing Ramadan may be more tired than usual. Your Muslim friends and coworkers don't stop working for an entire month, but they may tweak their schedules to allow for more rest. They may also stay indoors more (to prevent overheating) and avoid unnecessary physical activity to conserve energy. So, don't be offended if they aren't down for a pick-up game of basketball or soccer. We can't all be elite athletes.

8. DON'T OBSESS OVER FOOD AND HUNGER.

Family playing in the park.
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One of the worst things you can do to someone on a new diet is to obsess over all the cheeseburgers, pizza, and cupcakes they can't have. Similarly, most Muslims observing Ramadan don't want to have in-depth conversations about all the food and beverages they're avoiding. So, be mindful that you don't become the constant reminder of how many hours are left until sundown—just as you shouldn't joke about weight loss, you shouldn't call attention to any hunger pangs.

9. DON'T BE AFRAID TO EAT YOUR OWN FOOD.

Coworkers discussing a project on couches.
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Although it's nice to avoid talking about food in front of a fasting Muslim, don't be afraid to eat your own food as you normally would. Seeing other people eating and drinking isn't offensive—Muslims believe that Ramadan is all about sacrifice and self-discipline, and they're aware that not everyone participates. However, perhaps try to avoid scheduling lunch meetings or afternoon barbecues with your Muslim colleagues and friends. Any of those can surely wait until after Ramadan ends.

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