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Explosions heard 'round the world

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From North Korean nuclear tests to home-grown Mentos-n-Coke cocktails, if there's one thing our world has plenty of these days, it's explosions. Despite the frequency of modern explosions, however, there are a few historical booms which blow away the competition -- pun intended -- and are remembered today not only for their awesome destructive force, but for being audible many hundreds, if not thousands, of miles away.

The Tunguska Event
The cause of this famous 1908 explosion in Siberia is still contested by some -- everything from alien spacecraft to long-distance energy transmission experiments by Nikola Tesla gone wrong have been posited as its cause -- though most experts believe the culprit was a meteor, which exploded while it was still about six miles above a remote portion of Siberian forest. The blast released 15 megatons of energy—about a thousand times that of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima—and flattened 770 square miles (2,000 square kilometers) of forest. The shock wave broke windows and knocked people off their feet hundreds of miles away, and according to the 1966 Guinness Book, due to the rotation of the Earth, if the meteor had fallen just four and a half hours later it would've wiped the city of St. Petersburg from the map. And in semi-breaking news, scientists think they may have just found the meteorite's impact crater -- some 99 years later.

krakatoa.jpgKrakatoa
Certainly the biggest bang in recent history, the 1893 volcanic explosion on the Indonesian island of Krakatoa rocked the Southern hemisphere, sending 120-foot tidal waves crashing into nearby Java and Sumatra, smoke and debris into the atmosphere in such prodigious quantities that it caused global cooling of about four degrees over the next year, and could be heard from as far away as Perth, Australia (1,930 miles) and the island of Rodrigues near Mauritius (a stunning 3,000 miles distant). And as long as we're comparing explosions to Hiroshima, Krakatoa's force was about 1,000,000 times that of the famed nuke. What's more, all that atmospheric debris made for some dramatically blood-red sunsets 'round the world, which apparently inspired the apocalyptic sky in Munch's The Scream.

Mount Tambora
It seems no one can throw an eruption like Indonesia, also the site of the devastating 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora. The deadliest eruption ever recorded (it probably claimed some 92,000 victims), it ejected so much light-blocking debris into the atmosphere that 1816 was known as "The Year Without a Summer." Indeed, the crop failures and livestock deaths that resulted in much of the Northern hemisphere caused the worst famine of the 19th century -- all thanks to one big explosion. Though more destructive, it doesn't seem to have been as loud as Krakatoa (it was heard a mere 1,200 miles away on Sumatra), though that's still pretty darn loud. In 2004, archaeologists discovered extensive, Pompeii-like remains beneath deep pockets of eruption deposit, including victims, homes and items undisturbed in the positions they had held since the morning they were buried.

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A Simple Way to Charge Your iPhone in 5 Minutes
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Spotting the “low battery” notification on your phone is usually followed by a frantic search for an outlet and further stress over the fact that you may not have time for a full charge. On iPhones, plugging your device into the wall for five minutes might result in only a modest increase of about three percent or so. But this tip from Business Insider Tech may allow you to squeeze out a little more juice.

The trick? Before charging, put your phone in Airplane Mode so that you reduce the number of energy-sucking tasks (signal searching, fielding incoming communications) your device will try and perform.

Next, take the cover off if you have one (the phone might be generating extra heat as a result). Finally, try to use an iPad adapter, which has demonstrated a faster rate of charging than the adapter that comes with your iPhone.

Do that and you’ll likely double your battery boost, from about three to six percent. It may not sound like much, but that little bit of extra juice might keep you connected until you’re able to plug it in for a full charge.

[h/t Business Insider Tech]

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Trying to Save Money? Avoid Shopping on a Smartphone
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Today, Americans do most of their shopping online—but as anyone who’s indulged in late-night retail therapy likely knows, this convenience often can come with an added cost. Trying to curb expenses, but don't want to swear off the convenience of ordering groceries in your PJs? New research shows that shopping on a desktop computer instead of a mobile phone may help you avoid making foolish purchases, according to Co. Design. Ying Zhu, a marketing professor at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan, recently led a study to measure how touchscreen technology affects consumer behavior. Published in the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, her research found that people are more likely to make more frivolous, impulsive purchases if they’re shopping on their phones than if they’re facing a computer monitor. Zhu, along with study co-author Jeffrey Meyer of Bowling Green State University, ran a series of lab experiments on student participants to observe how different electronic devices affected shoppers’ thinking styles and intentions. Their aim was to see if subjects' purchasing goals changed when it came to buying frivolous things, like chocolate or massages, or more practical things, like food or office supplies. In one experiment, participants were randomly assigned to use a desktop or a touchscreen. Then, they were presented with an offer to purchase either a frivolous item (a $50 restaurant certificate for $30) or a useful one (a $50 grocery certificate for $30). These subjects used a three-point scale to gauge how likely they were to purchase the offer, and they also evaluated how practical or frivolous each item was. (Participants rated the restaurant certificate to be more indulgent than the grocery certificate.) Sure enough, the researchers found that participants had "significantly higher" purchase intentions for hedonic (i.e. pleasurable) products when buying on touchscreens than on desktops, according to the study. On the flip side, participants had significantly higher purchase intentions for utilitarian (i.e. practical) products while using desktops instead of touchscreens. "The playful and fun nature of the touchscreen enhances consumers' favor of hedonic products; while the logical and functional nature of a desktop endorses the consumers' preference for utilitarian products," Zhu explains in a press release. The study also found that participants using touchscreen technology scored significantly higher on "experiential thinking" than subjects using desktop computers, whereas those with desktop computers demonstrated higher scores for rational thinking. “When you’re in an experiential thinking mode, [you crave] excitement, a different experience,” Zhu explained to Co. Design. “When you’re on the desktop, with all the work emails, that interface puts you into a rational thinking style. While you’re in a rational thinking style, when you assess a product, you’ll look for something with functionality and specific uses.” Zhu’s advice for consumers looking to conserve cash? Stow away the smartphone when you’re itching to splurge on a guilty pleasure. [h/t Fast Company]

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