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It's not runes, it's just: Fun with Dictionaries

THE DICTIONARY: Miriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 11th Edition
THE WORD: red giant

Instead of boring you with a blurb about red giants (and assuring you that it'll be a long time before our sun becomes one), I thought I'd take a look back at the words selected this week, and try to assemble something from them--something ridiculous, in that it's random and hopefully a little fun. I've been trying to manufacture some theme out of the week's words, but if you want to help me take it one step further: if you had to come up with an idea for a TV show based on/incorporating these five words, what would it be?

Here, again, are the week's words: showmanship, loopy, consigliere, diaspora, red giant

I'm thinking a show that traces a band of zany and lovable lawyers (all named after red giants) as the only survivors of some natural disaster; they pilgrimage to other interstellar shores, which they soon find are populated and ruled by a class of wily consiglieres they are forced to join. Anybody else?

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How to Say Merry Christmas in 26 Different Languages
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“Merry Christmas” is a special greeting in English, since it’s the only occasion we say “merry” instead of “happy.” How do other languages spread yuletide cheer? Ampersand Travel asked people all over the world to send in videos of themselves wishing people a “Merry Christmas” in their own language, and while the audio quality is not first-rate, it’s a fun holiday-themed language lesson.

Feel free to surprise your friends and family this year with your new repertoire of foreign-language greetings.

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How Often Is 'Once in a Blue Moon'? Let Neil deGrasse Tyson Explain
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From “lit” to “I can’t even,” lots of colloquialisms make no sense. But not all confusing phrases stem from Millennial mouths. Take, for example, “once in a blue moon”—an expression you’ve likely heard uttered by teachers, parents, newscasters, and even scientists. This term is often used to describe a rare phenomenon—but why?

Even StarTalk Radio host Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn’t know for sure. “I have no idea why a blue moon is called a blue moon,” he tells Mashable. “There is nothing blue about it at all.”

A blue moon is the second full moon to appear in a single calendar month. Astronomy dictates that two full moons can technically occur in one month, so long as the first moon rises early in the month and the second appears around the 30th or 31st. This type of phenomenon occurs every couple years or so. So taken literally, “Once in a blue moon” must mean "every few years"—even if the term itself is often used to describe something that’s even more rare.

[h/t Mashable]

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