Things Nobody Told Me: Boy Scout Fashion

This is a new idea I'm trying out where I talk about something trivial I just learned about and then act outraged about how nobody told me. Here goes: A few weekends ago I was at the uniform store hunting for authentic Boy Scout neckerchiefs when I noticed this:

Why did no one tell me that Oscar de la Renta was designing Boy Scout accessories?

For anyone with me on the slow train, here's the belated scoop. At first, I was just wondering if Oscar was catering to some sort of fancier dressing subset of the Scout population. Apparently not. According to Scouting Magazine (the only source I trust for Boy Scout related news), after 60 years of basically the same uniform, the Scouts wanted to change their look. To make their outfits seem less military-like, the Boy Scouts entrusted fashion designer Oscar de la Renta?! Supposedly, de la Renta spent 4 years volunteering on the project, pulled off the "vestiges of military flavor," changed up the colors, added a baseball hat, and made neckerchief wear optional (amongst other things). In fact, the uniforms you see today are pretty much de la Renta designs, and Scouts have been wearing them ever since the early 80's. Who knew?

In any case, if all of this is true (I believe everything I read on the internet) it's been over 20 years since the outfit got an overhaul. I think the Scouts are ready for a new look. Any ideas on who should be designing them? Mark Ecko? Sean John? Leave your suggestions in the comment box if you got "˜em.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images
arrow
entertainment
David Lynch's Amazon T-Shirt Shop is as Surreal as His Movies
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images

David Lynch, the celebrated director behind baffling-but-brilliant films like Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, and Twin Peaks, is now selling his equally surreal T-shirts on Amazon.

As IndieWire reports, each shirt bears an image of one of Lynch’s paintings or photographs with an accompanying title. Some of his designs are more straightforward (the shirts labeled “House” and “Whale” feature, respectively, drawings of a house and a whale), while others are obscure (the shirt called “Chicken Head Tears” features a disturbing sculpture of a semi-human face).

This isn’t the first time Lynch has ventured into pursuits outside of filmmaking. Previously, he has sold coffee, designed furniture, produced music, hosted daily weather reports, and published a book about his experience with transcendental meditation. Art, in fact, falls a little closer to Lynch’s roots; the filmmaker trained for years at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts before making his mark in Hollywood.

Lynch’s Amazon store currently sells 57 T-shirts, ranging in size from small to triple XL, all for $26 each. As for our own feelings on the collection, we think they’re best reflected by this T-shirt named “Honestly, I’m Sort of Confused.”

Check out some of our favorites below:

T-shirt that says "Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"
"Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with a drawing of a sleeping bird on it
"Sleeping Bird"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt that says Peace on Earth over and over again. The caption is pretty on the nose.
"Peace on Earth"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a screaming face made out of turkey with ants in its mouth
"Turkey Cheese Head"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an odd sculpted clay face asking if you know who it is. You get the idea.
"I Was Wondering If You Know Who I Am?"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a sculpted head that is not a chicken. It is blue, though.
"Chicken Head Blue"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with a drawing of a lobster on it. Below the drawing, the lobster is labeled with the word lobster. Shocking, I know.
"Lobster"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an abstract drawing of what is by David Lynch's account, at least, a cowboy
"Cowboy"

Buy it on Amazon

[h/t IndieWire]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
video
Meet the Feather Artisans Who Adorn Paris's Cabaret Dancers
iStock
iStock

You can't have cabaret without the feathers. In Paris, one business has been making the plumed and bedazzled costumes for Moulin Rouge and other music halls since 1929. Maison Février has adorned the likes of Josephine Baker and French ballet dancer Zizi Jeanmaire, painstakingly attaching hundreds of feathers to headdresses, skirts, and other costume elements by hand. They use only feathers from birds specially bred—and not killed—for their colorful feathers. The results, as shown in the Great Big Story video below, are a delight to behold.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios