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Some Food Origins

You may have heard that pizza is an American invention, ice cream is Italian, and The Earl of Sandwich invented the sandwich. Not so! Here's a look at the origins of some foods you enjoy every day. Some are a lot older than you may think!

The sandwich was named after John Montague, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, who was a prominent citizen of 18th century England and who did, indeed, eat meat between two slices of bread. But he was far from the first. The earliest recorded account of what became known as a sandwich was a Passover dish. The ancient sage Hillel was known to put meat from the Passover lamb, along with the ceremonial bitter herbs, inside matzo (unleavened bread). Montague was also not the first sandwich-eater in Britain, as bread was often used as plates during the Middle Ages. Even today, one of the best things about a sandwich is the lack of dishwashing involved.
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Pasta is an Italian word, and Italy probably has the highest usage of pasta in the world, as well as the most shapes. But the food that is unleavened dough, extruded and dried, then boiled before eating, is definately Chinese. The oldest known noodles (pictured above) were found in 2005 in northwest China, supposedly 4,000 years old. I've occasionally put off cleaning out my refrigerator for a long time, but that's ridiculous.

More food history, after the jump.

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Is ice cream really an Italian invention? That depends on how you define ice cream. Frozen desserts were made in ancient times by mixing various ingredients with snow or ice. In warmer climates, this was a delicacy reserved for the wealthy, as ice had to be brought down from the highest mountains. The Arabs were the first to make ice cream using sugar, and the first to sell such treats from commercial factories. The first ice cream using milk was created in Italy in the Middle Ages. Ice cream was served in the courts of Charles I and Charles II of England in the mid-1600s. Several ice cream recipes appeared in the a French cookbook in 1700. Recipes with actual cream didn't appear until the 18th century. The earliest known recipe with cream was published in 1751 by a London cookbook author named Hannah Glasse.

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You've probably been told that pizza is an American invention. Not so, it is quite Italian, but pizza would never be if it weren't for the Americas. If you define pizza as Mediterranian flatbread cooked with tomatos, then you have your American connection. The tomato is a native American plant, introduced to Europe in the 16th century by Spanish travelers to America. Many Europeans considered the tomato to be poison, but they got over that eventually. By the 18th century, poor people in Italy were making tomato-based pizza, which led to street vendors, then finally the first pizzaria, Antica Pizzeria Port'Alba in Naples.

Update: For a much more detailed history of pizza, see David's Tuesday Turnip!

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There's an old saying, If you love sausage and you love the law, you don't want to watch either being made. The word sausage covers a lot of different foods, but is usually defined as ground meat packed in casings, often with salt and spices for both flavor and preservation. Traditionally, the casings were the intestines of butchered animals, but now are often made of cellulose or plastic. Almost all populated areas of the world have their own forms of sausage. It was developed to efficiently use all the available meat from an animal, even if it were in parts too small to serve on their own... or too ugly to appear appetizing. The origins of sausage date back to at least 3000 BC, when Sumerians in what is now Iraq invented the technique.
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Coffee consumption goes back to Ethiopia in the nineth century. The legend says that shepherds noticed the strange energetic way their goats danced after eating the berries of the wild coffee plant. Whether the story is true or not, it brings up a nice picture. By the 15th century, the beverage was popular all over the Middle East. It spread to Italy and the rest of Europe, and became fashionable after Pope Clement VIII pronounced the "Muslim drink" acceptable to Christians in 1600. Coffee consumption in America rested upon the availability of tea. During the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, coffee gained a significant hold in the US due to trade problems with Britain. Today, the majority of caffeine consumed worldwide comes from coffee.
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Hamburgers are indeed named after Hamburg, Germany, where they put pork roast on a bun. However, the sandwich we know as a hamburger, with grilled ground beef, was first recorded in 1885 in the United States. The delicacy seemed to arise in several locations, with Seymour, Wisconsin, Athens, Texas, and Hamburg, New York all claiming the first hamburger. On the other hand, the hot dog has a European origin. Frankfurt maintains the Frankfurter wurst was developed in the city in the 1480s. Vienna claims the hot dog decended from its wienerwurst. The city of Coburg in Bavaria says that a butcher there invented the "dachshund" or "little-dog" sausage. In any event, you have to wonder why people say "as American as hot dogs," when the hamburger has a better claim.

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Ralph Heimans/Buckingham Palace/PA Wire via Getty Images
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Pop Culture
The Cult of Prince Philip
Ralph Heimans/Buckingham Palace/PA Wire via Getty Images
Ralph Heimans/Buckingham Palace/PA Wire via Getty Images

For seven decades, Prince Philip has been one of the more colorful figures in Britain's Royal Family, prone to jarring remarks and quips about women, the deaf, and overweight children.

"You're too fat to be an astronaut," he once told a boy sharing his dream of space travel.

British media who delighted in quoting him are still lamenting the 96-year-old's recent retirement from public duties. But the people of the Pacific Island nation of Vanuatu are likely to be optimistic he'll now have the time to join them: They worship him as a god and have based a religion on him.

Followers of the Prince Philip Movement, which started in the 1960s, believe that the prince was born to fulfill an ancient prophecy: that the son of an ancient mountain spirit would one day take the form of a pale-skinned man, travel abroad, marry a powerful lady, and eventually return to the island. When villagers saw the prince’s portrait, they felt the spirit in it, and when he visited Vanuatu in 1974, they were convinced.

Chief Jack Naiva, a respected warrior in the culture, greeted the royal yacht and caught sight of Philip on board. "I saw him standing on the deck in his white uniform," Naiva once said. "I knew then that he was the true messiah."

True believers assign large world movements to the machinations of Philip. They once claimed his powers had enabled a black man to become president of the United States and that his "magic" had assisted in helping locate Osama bin Laden. The community has corresponded with Buckingham Palace and even sent Philip a nal-nal, a traditional club for killing pigs, as a token of its appreciation. In return, he sent a portrait in which he’s holding the gift.

Sikor Natuan, the son of the local chief, holds two official portraits of Britain's Prince Philip in front of the chief's hut in the remote village of Yaohnanen on Tanna in Vanuatu.
TORSTEN BLACKWOOD/AFP/Getty Images

The picture is now part of a shrine set up in Yaohnanen in Vanuatu that includes other photos and a Union flag. In May 2017, shortly after the Prince announced his retirement, a cyclone threatened the island—and its shrine. But according to Matthew Baylis, an author who has lived with the tribe, the natives didn't see this so much as a cause for concern as they did a harbinger of the prince's arrival so he can bask in their worship.

To date, Prince Philip has not announced any plans to relocate.

A version of this story ran in a 2012 issue of Mental Floss magazine.

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History
The Secret World War II History Hidden in London's Fences

In South London, the remains of the UK’s World War II history are visible in an unlikely place—one that you might pass by regularly and never take a second look at. In a significant number of housing estates, the fences around the perimeter are actually upcycled medical stretchers from the war, as the design podcast 99% Invisible reports.

During the Blitz of 1940 and 1941, the UK’s Air Raid Precautions department worked to protect civilians from the bombings. The organization built 60,000 steel stretchers to carry injured people during attacks. The metal structures were designed to be easy to disinfect in case of a gas attack, but that design ended up making them perfect for reuse after the war.

Many London housing developments at the time had to remove their fences so that the metal could be used in the war effort, and once the war was over, they were looking to replace them. The London County Council came up with a solution that would benefit everyone: They repurposed the excess stretchers that the city no longer needed into residential railings.

You can tell a stretcher railing from a regular fence because of the curves in the poles at the top and bottom of the fence. They’re hand-holds, designed to make it easier to carry it.

Unfortunately, decades of being exposed to the elements have left some of these historic artifacts in poor shape, and some housing estates have removed them due to high levels of degradation. The Stretcher Railing Society is currently working to preserve these heritage pieces of London infrastructure.

As of right now, though, there are plenty of stretchers you can still find on the streets. If you're in the London area, this handy Google map shows where you can find the historic fencing.

[h/t 99% Invisible]

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