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Make Yourself a Hat

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It's never too early to plan your Halloween costume. Some folks like to keep it simple. With these hats, you probably won't even need the rest of the costume to draw attention. Bonus: these are all homemade, and they come with instructions for making your own.

Are we not men? Rob at Cockeyed.com made these Devo hats for a Guitar Hero party, and posted step-by-step instructions.
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Check out this Chicken Viking Hat that Vicki at Knitorious made! This one may actually work better for Thanksgiving than for Halloween, but it's a conversation-starter whenever you wear it. Here are complete knitting instructions for a child size hat and an adult-sized hat. Update: Vicki made the sweater, and her friend made the hat for her. They call it the Cold Turkey hat, as they both quit smoking!

More hats, more instructions, after the jump.

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Instructables has a tutorial on how to make your own disco ball visor. What kind of costume should you wear with this? It doesn't really matter, since this will reflect all attention away from the rest of you.
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If you're ever going to be a balloon sculpture artist, you have to know how to make a balloon hat. Otherwise, passers-by on the street won't know you are a balloon sculpture artist! See the illlustrated tutorial here.
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If you are worried about aliens trying to take over your mind with radio signals or whatever they use these days, you can construct your own Aluminum Foil Defector Beanie (tinfoil hat).

It can't be stressed enough how important it is to have the shiny side pointing out. This is needed because the shiny side is most reflective to psychotronic radiation, while the dull side can actually, in certain environmental conditions, absorb it. However, as is illustrated in the instructions above, it is also wise to complement this with a layer of foil pointing shiny side in. This will keep your brain waves, which are also reflected by the shiny side, from being picked up by mind-reading equipment.

Or, you can buy one.
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The Giddyup! Pony Hood can be made with or without the kinky bit. The child size is downright adorable. Downloadable instructions are available from Naughty Needles. You'll also find a devil horn version.
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The original tutorial on how to make a cat fruit helmet has disappeared from the web. Too sad. I remember it required a bottle of tequila, limes, a knife, and a very patient cat. The tequila was only for inspiration, for which you can use the above picture. You can probably figure out the rest. Your cat may be just as happy about it as this one.
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Just in case nothing else you see here is at all useful or practical, here's down-to-earth instructions for making your child a witch's hat for her Halloween costume.

For more homemade hat choices, see How to Make a Trucker Hat Out of Garbage, How to make a Renaissance Hat, a Paper Pope Hat, a Cat In The Hat hat, or a Duct Tape Hat.

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Big Questions
Why Do Shorts Cost as Much as Pants?
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iStock

Shorts may feel nice and breezy on your legs on a warm summer’s day, but they’re not so gentle on your wallet. In general, a pair of shorts isn’t any cheaper than a pair of pants, despite one obviously using less fabric than the other. So what gives?

It turns out clothing retailers aren’t trying to rip you off; they’re just pricing shorts according to what it costs to produce them. Extra material does go into a full pair of pants but not as much as you may think. As Esquire explains, shorts that don’t fall past your knees may contain just a fifth less fabric than ankle-length trousers. This is because most of the cloth in these items is sewn into the top half.

Those same details that end up accounting for most of the material—flies, pockets, belt loops, waist bands—also require the most human labor to make. This is where the true cost of a garment is determined. The physical cotton in blue jeans accounts for just a small fraction of its price tag. Most of that money goes to pay the people stitching it together, and they put in roughly the same amount of time whether they’re working on a pair of boot cut jeans or some Daisy Dukes.

This price trend crops up across the fashion spectrum, but it’s most apparent in pants and shorts. For example, short-sleeved shirts cost roughly the same as long-sleeved shirts, but complicated stitching in shirt cuffs that you don’t see in pant legs can throw this dynamic off. There are also numerous invisible factors that make some shorts more expensive than nearly identical pairs, like where they were made, marketing costs, and the brand on the label. If that doesn’t make spending $40 on something that covers just a sliver of leg any easier to swallow, maybe check to see what you have in your closet before going on your next shopping spree.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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Musee YSL Marrakech
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Design
A Pair of New Museums Will Honor Fashion Icon Yves Saint Laurent
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Musee YSL Marrakech

In 2008, the legendary Yves Saint Laurent—the 20th century fashion luminary whose designs were inspired by fine art, menswear, Moroccan caftans, and peasant garb, among other influences—passed away at the age of 71. Now, nearly a decade after his death, fashion fans can pay homage to the iconic designer by visiting two new museums dedicated to his life and work, according to ARTnews.

Morocco's Musée Yves Saint Laurent Marrakech pays homage to the designer in a place he famously loved. (He first bought a house in the city in 1966, and his ashes were scattered there after his death.) In 1980, he and his partner Pierre Bergé bought Marrakech's Jardin Majorelle to prevent its destruction by developers, turning it into an immensely popular public garden. Located near the garden—along a street that is named after him—the new museum's permanent and temporary exhibits alike will feature clothing items like the designer's influential safari jackets and smoking suits along with sketches, accessories, and other archival items.

The Moroccan museum will serve as a sister institution to the new Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris, which is located at the site of Saint Laurent’s historic atelier and office in France. Following an extensive renovation of the building, the Paris institution will house thousands of sketches, photos, and fashion items related to the designer. The first exhibition will be a themed retrospective, “Yves Saint Laurent’s Imaginary Asia."

Both museums are scheduled to open in October. We’re already donning our smoking jackets.

[h/t ARTnews]

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