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Make Yourself a Hat

It's never too early to plan your Halloween costume. Some folks like to keep it simple. With these hats, you probably won't even need the rest of the costume to draw attention. Bonus: these are all homemade, and they come with instructions for making your own.

Are we not men? Rob at Cockeyed.com made these Devo hats for a Guitar Hero party, and posted step-by-step instructions.
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Check out this Chicken Viking Hat that Vicki at Knitorious made! This one may actually work better for Thanksgiving than for Halloween, but it's a conversation-starter whenever you wear it. Here are complete knitting instructions for a child size hat and an adult-sized hat. Update: Vicki made the sweater, and her friend made the hat for her. They call it the Cold Turkey hat, as they both quit smoking!

More hats, more instructions, after the jump.

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Instructables has a tutorial on how to make your own disco ball visor. What kind of costume should you wear with this? It doesn't really matter, since this will reflect all attention away from the rest of you.
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If you're ever going to be a balloon sculpture artist, you have to know how to make a balloon hat. Otherwise, passers-by on the street won't know you are a balloon sculpture artist! See the illlustrated tutorial here.
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If you are worried about aliens trying to take over your mind with radio signals or whatever they use these days, you can construct your own Aluminum Foil Defector Beanie (tinfoil hat).

It can't be stressed enough how important it is to have the shiny side pointing out. This is needed because the shiny side is most reflective to psychotronic radiation, while the dull side can actually, in certain environmental conditions, absorb it. However, as is illustrated in the instructions above, it is also wise to complement this with a layer of foil pointing shiny side in. This will keep your brain waves, which are also reflected by the shiny side, from being picked up by mind-reading equipment.

Or, you can buy one.
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The Giddyup! Pony Hood can be made with or without the kinky bit. The child size is downright adorable. Downloadable instructions are available from Naughty Needles. You'll also find a devil horn version.
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The original tutorial on how to make a cat fruit helmet has disappeared from the web. Too sad. I remember it required a bottle of tequila, limes, a knife, and a very patient cat. The tequila was only for inspiration, for which you can use the above picture. You can probably figure out the rest. Your cat may be just as happy about it as this one.
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Just in case nothing else you see here is at all useful or practical, here's down-to-earth instructions for making your child a witch's hat for her Halloween costume.

For more homemade hat choices, see How to Make a Trucker Hat Out of Garbage, How to make a Renaissance Hat, a Paper Pope Hat, a Cat In The Hat hat, or a Duct Tape Hat.

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Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC
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Pop Culture
Royal Shakespeare Company Auctions Off Costumes Worn By Ian McKellen, Judi Dench, Patrick Stewart, and More
Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC
Helen Maybanks, (c) RSC

The stages of the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford-upon-Avon, England have been graced by some of the most celebrated performers of our day. Now, the legendary theater company is giving fans a chance to own the original costumes that helped bring their characters to life. On April 17, more than 50 costumes worn in RSC productions will hit eBay to raise money for the group's Stitch in Time campaign.

With this new campaign, the RSC aims to raise enough money to renovate the aging workshop where costume designers create all the handmade garments used in their shows. Following a play's run, the costumes are either rented out to other theaters or kept safe in the company's museum collections. Designers often make duplicates of the items, which means that the RSC is able to auction off some of their most valuable pieces to the public.

The eBay costume auction includes clothing worn by some of the most prolific actors to work with the company. Bidders will find Patrick Stewart's beige shorts from the 2006 production of Antony and Cleopatra, David Tennant's white tunic from 2013's Richard II, Ian McKellen's red, floor-length coat from 2007's King Lear, and Judi Dench's black doublet from 2016's Shakespeare Live! Costumes worn by Anita Dobson, Susannah York, and Simon Russell Beale will also be featured.

All proceeds from the auction go to restoring the RSC's costume workshop. Shakespeare fans have until April 27 to place their bids.

Patrick Stewart in Antony and Cleopatra.
Pascal Molliere, (c) RSC

Actors in stage play.
Manuel Harlan, (c) RSC

Actor in stage play.
Kwame Lestrade, (c) RSC
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PRNewsfoto/PolyU
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technology
This 3D Human Modeling App Could Revolutionize Online Clothes Shopping
PRNewsfoto/PolyU
PRNewsfoto/PolyU

A team of academics in Hong Kong have developed a 3D human modeling app that could drastically change the way we shop online. Dubbed 1Measure, this “one-click measure” tool allows users to record their body measurements in a matter of seconds by uploading two full-body photos.

After snapping images with both a front view and side view, the app uses artificial intelligence to create a 3D digital model of the user's body in under 10 seconds. Next to this image, over 50 size measurements are displayed, including everything from knee girth to shoulder slope. This information can be saved and accessed at a later date, and the app also lists your size in other countries, allowing you to shop for clothes around the world with ease.

This revolutionary technology was developed by associate professor Tracy P.Y. Mok and PhD graduate Dr. Zhu Shuaiyin of the Institute of Textiles and Clothing at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU).

Other current technologies are capable of carrying out similar modeling functions, but the PolyU team says these methods involve costly, bulky scanners, and their results are only approximate. The 1Measure app’s margin of error is 1 centimeter for users photographed in tight-fitting clothes, and 2 centimeters for those in loose-fitting clothes, according to its developers.

The app is particularly useful when it comes to online shopping. Dr. Zhu says the technology “frees us from the limitations imposed by taking body measurements physically, helping customers to select the right size in online clothing purchases.”

The app can also store multiple measurements at once and track any changes that the body undergoes, making it suitable for those with fitness goals.

1Measure is free to download and is currently available on the App Store in both English and Chinese.

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