Surprise Endings

The San Francisco Giants are calling it an era. Barry Bonds won't be returning next season, ending his 15-year stint by the Bay. Although Bonds became a star in Pittsburgh, it'll be strange to see him in a different uniform next year (though I'm not sure he'll have many suitors.)

Here are fifteen twenty-four other superstars who ended their careers in super-strange uniforms, courtesy of GameKult, The Sporting News and The Fowl Line:

simpson-ewing-namath.jpg

O.J. Simpson, San Francisco 49ers; Patrick Ewing, Orlando Magic; Joe Namath, Los Angeles Rams.

malone-montana-unitas.jpg

Karl Malone, Los Angeles Lakers; Joe Montana, Kansas City Chiefs; Johnny Unitas, San Diego Chargers.

harris-jordan-smith.jpg

Franco Harris, Seattle Seahawks; Michael Jordan, Washington Wizards; Emmitt Smith, Arizona Cardinals.

mays-howe-santo.jpg

Willie Mays, New York Mets; Gordie Howe, Hartford Whalers; Ron Santo, Chicago White Sox.

bourque-thomas-dorsett.jpg

Ray Bourque, Colorado Avalanche; Thurman Thomas, Miami Dolphins; Tony Dorsett, Denver Broncos.

What other sports legends forever tied to one city ended their careers in another?

UPDATE: Great responses, everyone. I found an old Uni Watch column from ESPN that really nailed this topic. Here are a few more...

rodman-murphy-hakeem.jpg

Dennis Rodman, Dallas Mavericks; Dale Murphy, Colorado Rockies, Hakeem Olajuwon, Toronto Raptors.

hernandez-kosar-frazier.jpg

Keith Hernandez, Cleveland Indians; Bernie Kosar, Miami Dolphins; Walt Frazier, Cleveland Cavaliers.

wilkins-greenberg-campbell.jpg

Dominique Wilkins, Orlando Magic; Hank Greenberg, Pittsburgh Pirates; Earl Campbell, New Orleans Saints.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
College Board Wants to Erase Thousands of Years From AP World History, and Teachers Aren't Happy
iStock
iStock

One would be forgiven for thinking that the Ides of March are upon us, because Julius Caesar is being taken out once again—this time from the Advanced Placement World History exam. The College Board in charge of the AP program is planning to remove the Roman leader, and every other historical figure who lived and died prior to 1450, from high school students’ tests, The New York Times reports.

The nonprofit board recently announced that it would revise the test, beginning in 2019, to make it more manageable for teachers and students alike. The current exam covers over 10,000 years of world history, and according to the board, “no other AP course requires such an expanse of content to be covered over a single school year.”

As an alternative, the board suggested that schools offer two separate year-long courses to cover the entirety of world history, including a Pre-AP World History and Geography class focusing on the Ancient Period (before 600 BCE) up through the Postclassical Period (ending around 1450). However, as Politico points out, a pre-course for which the College Board would charge a fee "isn’t likely to be picked up by cash-strapped public schools," and high school students wouldn't be as inclined to take the pre-AP course since there would be no exam or college credit for it.

Many teachers and historians are pushing back against the proposed changes and asking the board to leave the course untouched. Much of the controversy surrounds the 1450 start date and the fact that no pre-colonial history would be tested.

“They couldn’t have picked a more Eurocentric date,” Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, who previously helped develop AP History exams and courses, told The New York Times. “If you start in 1450, the first thing you’ll talk about in terms of Africa is the slave trade. The first thing you’ll talk about in terms of the Americas is people dying from smallpox and other things. It’s not a start date that encourages looking at the agency and creativity of people outside Europe.”

A group of teachers who attended an AP open forum in Salt Lake City also protested the changes. One Michigan educator, Tyler George, told Politico, “Students need to understand that there was a beautiful, vast, and engaging world before Europeans ‘discovered’ it.”

The board is now reportedly reconsidering its decision and may push the start date of the course back some several hundred years. Their decision will be announced in July.

[h/t The New York Times]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
North America: East or West Coast?
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios