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The First Time News Was Fit To Print, VIII

Today we continue our journey through the archives of The New York Times. If you're new to the series, we've been digging up first mentions worth mentioning. Let's get right to it.

Bob Dylan

September 29, 1961

20-Year-Old Singer Is Bright New Face At Gerde's Club
Resembling a cross between a choir boy and a beatnik, Mr. Dylan has a cherubic look and a mop of tousled hair he partly covers with a Huck Finn black corduroy cap. His clothes may need a bit of tailoring, but when he works his guitar, harmonica or piano and composes new songs faster than he can remember them, there is no doubt that he is bursting at the seams with talent.
* * * * *
But if not for every taste, his music-making has the mark of originality and inspiration, all the more noteworthy for his youth. Mr. Dylan is vague about his antecedents and birthplace, but it matters less where he has been than where he is going, and that would seem to be straight up.

New York Jets

April 16, 1963

Titans Get A New Coach (Ewbank) And A New Name (Jets)
NYJets.jpgWilbur (Weeb) Ewbank, as expected, was appointed yesterday as coach and general manager of New York's American Football League team for three years. But the name he will be expected to cover with gridiron glory was, unexpectedly, announced as the Jets. It used to be the Titans. The Jets, which rhymes with Mets, was selected from more than 300 possible names submitted by friends, enemies and advertising agencies.
* * * * *
The Jets symbolizes the site of Shea Stadium (where the Jets think they'll play this fall) between two major airports, the spirit of modern times and the speed and eagerness of all concerned. Gothams, Borros and Dodgers were other leading contenders. Dodgers was discarded because the baseball people were not in favor. Borros (a pun on boroughs) was discarded because there was fear the team would be called the jackasses, and Gothams was dismissed because someone said that it would be shortened to Goths "“ "and you know they weren't such nice people."

Read on for The McLauhlin Group, David Sedaris, war on terror and Barbie.

The McLaughlin Group

October 20, 1982

Now Playing At The Zoo
mclaughlin-john-crop.jpg A weekend visitor to the National Zoo was surprised to discover a group of apes peering through the bars of their cage at a television set, looking like many other Washington viewers, reasonably attentive to the political talk show being broadcast but not stirred to excitement. The apes were following The McLaughlin Group on the local NBC channel in which four journalists discuss current events under the guidance of John J. McLaughlin. He is a former Jesuit priest who served as a special assistant in the Nixon White House.
* * * * *
Research determined that the apes have been watching television for years and are the only zoo inmates so privileged. The 12-inch portable is shifted periodically between the gorillas and the orangutans; they have no voice in the programming, which is determined by the keeper. No one has tried to determine whether the specialized audience favors Days of Our Lives, say, over reruns of Wild Kingdom.

David Sedaris

July 4, 1993

He Does Radio And Windows
sedaris.jpg As his celebrity sprouted this spring, David Sedaris was visited in New York by a fan from Dallas, who asked him excitedly, "What's it like to wake up in the morning and be David Sedaris?" On a recent hot summer morning, being David Sedaris meant sticking your hand into the toilet in the Gramercy Park apartment of a personal trainer and doing a vigorous scrub. It meant washing the man's dishes and cleaning his cat's litter box, changing the sheets and vacuuming the worn carpet. Then it meant going to another apartment and doing roughly the same thing. Most mornings, Mr. Sedaris said, with his high-tech retractable feather duster sticking from his back pocket, "I'm a maid."
* * * * *
But earlier that morning, not long before he started cleaning for $10 an hour, Mr. Sedaris's high-pitched, acidic voice was heard by the estimated one million people who listen to "Morning Edition" on National Public Radio as he read excerpts from the diaries he has kept for 15 years. Each month, as the show broadcasts his thoughts on being an unrepentant smoker, on falling in love too easily, on soap operas and on men who love women who grow too much (and are subjects in Giantess magazine), Mr. Sedaris becomes more of a minor phenomenon.
* * * * *
Larry Charles called Mr. Sedaris to discuss the possibility of his writing for Seinfeld, but the producer said last week that he now thinks Mr. Sedaris might be too idiosyncratic even for Seinfeld. "He seems like a guy who's really committed to his art," Mr. Charles said. "He would clean apartments so he can read these things on the radio."

War On Terror

December 4, 1934

Soviet Arrests 71 In War On 'Terror'
USSR.jpg Spurred by the assassination of Sergei M. Kiroff, the Soviet Government has struck its heaviest blow in years at those whom it regards as plotters of terroristic acts against Soviet officials. With dramatic suddenness it was announced early this morning that seventy-one persons had been arrested and haled to trial before the military collegium of the Supreme Court of the USSR. Thirty-two of these were seized in the Moscow region and thirty-nene in the Leningrad region. They are stigmatized as "White Guards" and accused of plotting terroristic activities.
* * * * *
By the terms of a decree adopted by the central government immediately after the Kremlin received the news of M. Kiroff's death, terrorists and plotters are to be tried swiftly and to be executed immediately without opportunity for appeal.

Barbie

February 7, 1959

Booming Business Built By Husband And Wife Team
barbie.jpegFifteen years ago Elliott and Ruth Handler were a suburban couple doing spare-time tinkering with handicrafts in their garage. Today they head a $14 million-a-year business that has been mushrooming at a rate of 50% a year and is third in its field. The field: toys.
* * * * *
The operations of their company, Mattel, Inc., are so rigorously organized that the Handlers sometimes wonder why they are still making toys. "With our system," Ruth said whimsically, "we might just as well be turning out real airplanes or missiles."
* * * * *
To balance the heavy male emphasis in toy guns, the Handlers this year are bringing out a doll "“ eleven inches high and named "Barbie," after their 17-year-old daughter....The doll has a teen-age figure, contrasting with the infantile rotundity traditionally given dolls to simplify clothes-making. To produce at a feasible cost "Barbie's" twenty-two costume wardrobe, the Handlers have opened a production branch in Japan's even though it means paying a 35% import tariff. They also are making a line of doll furniture in Japan. Their experience "“ bolstered by a brigade of slide-rule artists "“ gives them confidence that this time they'll make a profit on it.

Got a suggestion for Volume IX? Leave it in the comments.
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, I
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, II
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, III
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, IV
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, V
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, VI
The First Time News Was Fit To Print, VII

T.jpgWant complete access to The New York Times archives, which go all the way back to 1851? Become an NYT subscriber.

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10 Things We Know About The Handmaid’s Tale Season 2
Hulu
Hulu

Though Hulu has been producing original content for more than five years now, 2017 turned out to be a banner year for the streaming network with the debut of The Handmaid’s Tale on April 26, 2017. The dystopian drama, based on Margaret Atwood’s 1985 book, imagines a future in which a theocratic regime known as Gilead has taken over the United States and enslaved fertile women so that the group’s most powerful couples can procreate.

If it all sounds rather bleak, that’s because it is—but it’s also one of the most impressive new series to arrive in years (as evidenced by the slew of awards it has won, including eight Emmy and two Golden Globe Awards). Fortunately, fans left wanting more don’t have that much longer to wait, as season two will premiere on Hulu in April. In the meantime, here’s everything we know about The Handmaid’s Tale’s second season.

1. IT WILL PREMIERE WITH TWO EPISODES.

When The Handmaid’s Tale returns on April 25, 2018, Hulu will release the first two of its 13 new episodes on premiere night, then drop another new episode every Wednesday.

2. MARGARET ATWOOD WILL CONTINUE TO HELP SHAPE THE NARRATIVE.

Fans of Atwood’s novel who didn’t like that season one went beyond the original source material are in for some more disappointment in season two, as the narrative will again go beyond the scope of what Atwood covered. But creator/showrunner Bruce Miller doesn’t necessarily agree with the criticism they received in season one.

“People talk about how we're beyond the book, but we're not really," Miller told Newsweek. "The book starts, then jumps 200 years with an academic discussion at the end of it, about what's happened in those intervening 200 years. We're not going beyond the novel. We're just covering territory [Atwood] covered quickly, a bit more slowly.”

Even more importantly, Miller's got Atwood on his side. The author serves as a consulting producer on the show, and the title isn’t an honorary one. For Miller, Atwood’s input is essential to shaping the show, particularly as it veers off into new territories. And they were already thinking about season two while shooting season one. “Margaret and I had started to talk about the shape of season two halfway through the first [season],” he told Entertainment Weekly.

In fact, Miller said that when he first began working on the show, he sketched out a full 10 seasons worth of storylines. “That’s what you have to do when you’re taking on a project like this,” he said.

3. MOTHERHOOD WILL BE A CENTRAL THEME.

As with season one, motherhood is a key theme in the series. And June/Offred’s pregnancy will be one of the main plotlines. “So much of [Season 2] is about motherhood,” Elisabeth Moss said during the Television Critics Association press tour. “Bruce and I always talked about the impending birth of this child that’s growing inside her as a bit of a ticking time bomb, and the complications of that are really wonderful to explore. It’s a wonderful thing to have a baby, but she’s having it potentially in this world that she may not want to bring it into. And then, you know, if she does have the baby, the baby gets taken away from her and she can’t be its mother. So, obviously, it’s very complicated and makes for good drama. But, it’s a very big part of this season, and it gets bigger and bigger as the show goes on.”

4. THE RESISTANCE IS COMING.

Just because June is pregnant, don’t expect her to sit on the sidelines as the resistance to Gilead continues. “There is more than one way to resist," Moss said. “There is resistance within [June], and that is a big part of this season.”

5. WE’LL GET TO SEE THE COLONIES.

A scene from 'The Handmaid's Tale'
Hulu

Miller, understandably, isn’t eager to share too many details about the new season. “I’m not being cagey!” he swore to Entertainment Weekly. “I just want the viewers to experience it for themselves!” What he did confirm is that the new season will bring us to the colonies—reportedly in episode two—and show what life is like for those who have been sent there.

It will also delve further into what life is like for the refugees who managed to escape Gilead, like Luke and Moira.

6. MARISA TOMEI WILL APPEAR IN AN EPISODE.

Though she won’t be a regular cast member, Miller recently announced that Oscar winner Marisa Tomei will make a guest appearance in the new season’s second episode. Yes, the one that will show us the Colonies. In fact, that’s where we’ll meet her; Tomei is playing the wife of a Commander.

7. WE’LL LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ORIGINS OF GILEAD.

As a group shrouded in secrecy, we still don’t know much about how and where Gilead began. That will change a bit in season two. When discussing some of the questions viewers will have answered, executive producer Warren Littlefield promised that, "How did Gilead come about? How did this happen?” would be two of them. “We get to follow the historical creation of this world,” he said.

8. THERE WILL BE AT LEAST ONE HANDMAID FUNERAL.

A scene from 'The Handmaid's Tale'
Hulu

While Miller wouldn’t talk about who the handmaids are mourning in a teaser shot from season two that shows a handmaid’s funeral, he was excited to talk about creating the look for the scene. “Everything from the design of their costumes to the way they look is so chilling,” Miller told Entertainment Weekly. “These scenes that are so beautiful, while set in such a terrible place, provide the kind of contrast that makes me happy.”

9. ELISABETH MOSS SAYS THE TONE WILL BE DARKER.

Like season one, Miller says that The Handmaid’s Tale's second season will again balance its darker, dystopian themes with glimpses of hopefulness. “I think the first season had very difficult things, and very hopeful things, and I think this season is exactly the same way,” he told the Los Angeles Times. “There come some surprising moments of real hope and victory, and strength, that come from surprising places.”

Moss, however, has a different opinion. “It's a dark season,” she told reporters at TCA. “I would say arguably it's darker than Season 1—if that's possible.”

10. IT WILL ALSO BE BLOODIER.

A scene from 'The Handmaid's Tale'
Hulu

When pressed about how the teaser images for the new season seemed to feature a lot of blood, Miller conceded: “Oh gosh, yeah. There may be a little more blood this season.”

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NUS Environmental Research Institute, Subnero
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Researchers in Singapore Deploy Robot Swans to Test Water Quality
NUS Environmental Research Institute, Subnero
NUS Environmental Research Institute, Subnero

There's something peculiar about the new swans floating around reservoirs in Singapore. They drift across the water like normal birds, but upon closer inspection, onlookers will find they're not birds at all: They're cleverly disguised robots designed to test the quality of the city's water.

As Dezeen reports, the high-tech waterfowl, dubbed NUSwan (New Smart Water Assessment Network), are the work of researchers at the National University of Singapore [PDF]. The team invented the devices as a way to tackle the challenges of maintaining an urban water source. "Water bodies are exposed to varying sources of pollutants from urban run-offs and industries," they write in a statement. "Several methods and protocols in monitoring pollutants are already in place. However, the boundaries of extensive assessment for the water bodies are limited by labor intensive and resource exhaustive methods."

By building water assessment technology into a plastic swan, they're able to analyze the quality of the reservoirs cheaply and discreetly. Sensors on the robots' undersides measure factors like dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll levels. The swans wirelessly transmit whatever data they collect to the command center on land, and based on what they send, human pilots can remotely tweak the robots' performance in real time. The hope is that the simple, adaptable technology will allow researchers to take smarter samples and better understand the impact of the reservoir's micro-ecosystem on water quality.

Man placing robotic swan in water.
NUS Environmental Research Institute, Subnero

This isn't the first time humans have used robots disguised as animals as tools for studying nature. Check out this clip from the BBC series Spy in the Wild for an idea of just how realistic these robots can get.

[h/t Dezeen]

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