Gotta Read 'Em All

I've been mildly obsessed with the novels of Nevil Shute for the past three years, and have finally completed my collection of his books -- 25 volumes in all, including an autobiography. I still have two books left to read, and they're lined up at the end of my Shute Shelf. The unread books are both old editions from the 50's, and have that pleasant library/grandma's attic smell to them.

This is not the first time I've read every book by a given author -- I had a Michael Crichton phase in high school, followed by an Arthur C. Clarke phase (I didn't read everything, but close). Prior to high school, I'm pretty sure I read everything Cynthia Voigt ever wrote. After college I discovered and devoured Neal Stephenson's work (including the Stephen Bury books).

Anyway, it took me years to track down all the Nevil Shute volumes, and I feel a certain completist satisfaction in seeing them all together on a shelf. When I finish the last one, I'm considering going back and reading them over, chronologically (I hear you get bonus nerd points for doing that). Shute's books are pretty similar in their details: there's generally some sort of challenge that necessitates a long journey, a lot of technical material concerning airplanes and boats, and some sort of wartime romance. Despite this similarity of theme (or perhaps because of it), I still enjoy each volume, and reading so much by a single author has taught me something about writing -- I can see him experimenting with technique, and I can see his style evolve over time. I'm even considering going to a meetup sponsored by the Nevil Shute Norway Foundation -- thus solidifying my status as a superfan.

Anyway, all this got me thinking: which authors have inspired you to read all their work? And yeah, I suppose J.K. Rowling counts.

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN
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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

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