Progress at Ground Zero

A year ago, I snapped this picture of the big hole that was Ground Zero five years after 9/11.

The New York Post created this graphic to show what the plans are for the site. According to the article, rebuilding has started in earnest now, with 600 workers on site to have the area completely rebuilt by 2012. See the full-size version here.
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See the progress, after the jump.

Below-ground construction on the Freedom Tower began in April of 2006. As of now, steel beams have been erected around the perimeter, and visible progress should be seen by the spring of 2008. This is what it looked like last month.
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And this is how it will appear when completed. See more pictures at the website of architects Skidmore, Owings and Merrill.
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The World Trade Center Memorial and Museum will be 30 feet below ground level. 121 of the 150 concrete footings for the memorial have been poured. The design is named Reflecting Absence. When finished, the walls will be waterfalls along the original footprints of the Twin Towers (although 30 feet shorter, for technical reasons). The names of those who died on 9/11 will be included in the memorial.
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7 World Trade Center, which also collapsed on 9/11 was rebuilt beginning in 2002 and completed in 2006. The new building is 52 stories tall (five stories taller than the orginal). This photo is by Aude (cc). You can see it as a bluish building in the background of the picture I took last year.
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The Port Authority has built a temporary train station to be used until 2009, when a new permanent (and artistic) transportation hub opens. Here is what construction looked like this summer. Note the many cranes in use.
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And here's an artist rendering of the entrance to the permanent station.
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Gothamist predicts that the Freedom Tower will open in 2011 whether it's finished or not, to coincide with the ten-year anniversary of 9/11. When completed, the $16 billion World Trade Center rebuilding project will be the most expensive ever for New York City.

If you'd like to follow the rebuilding in real time, bookmark this live webcam at Ground Zero. There may be outages today, as more than usual traffic is expected for the anniversary of 9/11. There are more anniversary links today at Ursi's Blog.

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Houben and Van Mierlo Architecten
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Dutch City Will Become the World's First to Build Inhabitable 3D-Printed Concrete Houses
Houben and Van Mierlo Architecten
Houben and Van Mierlo Architecten

A new 3D-printed concrete housing development is coming to the Netherlands in 2019, CNN reports. The structures will be the first habitable 3D-printed concrete houses in the world, according to Project Milestone, the organization behind the initiative.

While architects and engineers have been experimenting with 3D-printed buildings for several years, most of those structures have just been prototypes. The Dutch development, located in Eindhoven, is expected to be ready for its first residents by mid-2019.

Project Milestone is a collaboration between the city of Eindhoven, Eindhoven University of Technology, the contractor Van Wijnen, the real estate company Vesteda—which will own and manage the houses—the engineering consultancy Witteveen+Bos, and the construction materials company Weber Beamix.

A rendering of boulder-like homes in the middle of a field
Houben and Van Mierlo Architecten

The five planned homes will be built one by one, giving the architects and engineers time to adjust their process as needed. The development is expected to be completed over the next five years.

The housing development won’t look like your average residential neighborhood: The futuristic houses resemble massive boulders with windows in them. The first house, scheduled for completion in 2019, will be a 1022-square-foot, three-room home. It will be a single-story house, though all the rest of the homes will have multiple stories. The first house will be built using the concrete printer on the Eindhoven University of Technology’s campus, but eventually the researchers hope to move the whole fabrication process on-site.

In the next few years, 3D-printed houses will likely become more commonplace. A 3D-printed home in Tennessee is expected to break ground sometime later in 2018. One nonprofit is currently trying to raise money to build a development of 100 3D-printed houses in El Salvador within the next two years. And there is already a 3D-printed office building open in Dubai.

In Eindhoven, residents appear to be fairly eager for the development to open. Twenty families have already applied to live in the first home.

You can learn more about the construction process in the video below.

[h/t CNN]

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iStock
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These Proposed Concrete Pipe Homes Could Ease the Housing Shortage in Hong Kong
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iStock

For many young people in Hong Kong, where space is limited and rent continues to soar, moving out of their parents’ home and into their own apartment remains a pipe dream. But Hong Kong-based architect James Law has his own pipe dream—and it could bring some much-needed affordable housing to the city of 7.3 million.

As spotted by Dezeen, a concept by the architecture firm James Law Cybertecture outlines a plan to construct micro homes out of concrete water pipes. The individual pipe homes could be stacked on top of each other and squeezed into narrow, unused spaces between city buildings.

"OPod Tube Housing is an experimental, low-cost, micro-living housing unit to ease Hong Kong's affordable housing problems," James Law told Dezeen.

Although it's still a concept, an “OPod Tube Housing” prototype built by the firm is homier than you would expect. The tubular-shaped home contains all the basic necessities for cooking, bathing, and sleeping. A bench seat can be converted into a bed, and there’s room for a mini fridge, microwave, suitcase stand, and clothing rack. The glazed door also doubles as a window, and lighting strips and a retractable lamp are also built into the homes.

Hong Kong is one of the most expensive places to live on Earth, and the average resident’s apartment takes up about 150 square feet of space, according to Quartz. Another company in Hong Kong, called Markbox, has been converting shipping containers into micro apartments.

Check out Quartz’s video below to learn more about the OPod Tube Housing design.

[h/t Dezeen]

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