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Rephotographs - Third View Project

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While I am definitely into photography, I only recently learned about rephotography -- the practice of returning to the site of a previous photograph and taking a new image, then comparing them. Third View is a "rephotographic survey of the American West," showcasing series of rephotographs (a minimum of two, but often three) from a variety of locations. From the site:

Third View revisits the sites of historic western American landscape photographs. The project makes new photographs, keeps a field diary of its travels, and collects materials useful in interpreting the scenes, change and the passage of time.

The Third View project began in 1997 and completed fieldwork in the year 2000. Over the course of four years the project revisited 109 historic landscape sites, all subjects of nineteenth-century American western survey photographs. The project's "rephotographs" were made from the originals' vantage points with as much precision as possible. Every attempt was also made to duplicate the original photographs' lighting conditions, both in time of day and year.

Third View photos will be on display at the Blue Sky Gallery in Portland through September. There's more about rephotography at Wikipedia, including a description of the Second View project (a precursor to Third View, above). Be sure to check out the External Links section at the bottom of the page, where I found a new personal favorite: In Twin Peaks, a project to rephotograph filming locations from the series.

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Health
UV Photos Show the Areas We Miss When Applying Sunscreen
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Sunscreen only works if you're actually wearing it. And it's too easy to go through the motions of putting on sunscreen while still leaving large amounts of skin unprotected. Even if you're applying the recommended shot glass of sunscreen before you head out into the world, parts of your skin may still be exposed to harmful rays. Just check out these UV images taken by researchers at the University of Liverpool, spotted by the UK's Metro.

The black-and-white images were taken with a UV camera so that any part of the skin covered by UV-blocking sunscreen would appear dark. Skin without sunscreen on it, by contrast, remains visible. The 57 volunteers in the study—which was recently presented at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual Conference—were instructed to apply sunscreen to their face as usual.

A black-and-white UV photo of a woman’s blotchy sunscreen application

Some volunteers were more thorough than others, but as a whole, the group ended up missing a median of 9.5 percent of their faces. Men with beards tended to miss a lot of their faces, you might notice in the photos, and people seemed to have trouble with covering the full area around their mouth. However, the main problems occurred around the eyes. Many people missed their eyelids, and more than three-quarters of the group missed the medial canthal region, or the area between the bridge of the nose and the inner corner of the eye.

A UV photo of a man shows white patches of bare skin underneath dark-looking sunscreen.

The finding is significant because the area around the eyes are particularly susceptible to skin cancer. According to the abstract presented at the conference, 5 to 10 percent of skin cancers occur on the eyelids.

Knowing this doesn't necessarily help, though. When the participants were brought back for a second visit, the researchers gave them new instructions that included data on cancer risks for eyelids, the results barely changed. People put slightly more sunscreen on around their eyelids (they missed a median 7.7 percent instead of 13.5 percent of the area) but almost everyone still missed their medial canthal area.

A woman turns her face to show sunscreen coverage in a UV image.

It's not a surprising finding, considering the fact that no one wants to get sunscreen in their eyes. Sunscreen manufacturers recommend that you keep it out of your eyes, and if it does run, you'll end up in tears. So it's not particularly useful to tell people they should be coating their eyelids in Coppertone.

To keep your face super smooth and reduce your likelihood of sun damage, then, the message is clear. Better get some shades, unless you've got a UV-blocking eyeshadow on hand. Better yet, get yourself a hat, too.

[h/t Metro]

All images by Kareem Hassanin, courtesy Kevin Hamill

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Belmond
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travel
Take a Look Inside South America’s First Luxury Sleeper Train
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Belmond

Unlike, say, Japan, South America isn’t particularly well-known for its trains. The continent just got its first luxury sleeper train, though, so you can add it to your multi-day rail travel bucket list. The Belmond Andean Explorer set off on its inaugural journey in May, traveling across Peru from Cusco (near Machu Picchu) to the colonial city of Arequipa.

The train itself, with interiors designed by the London-based firm MUZA and recently featured on Yatzer, is a far cry from your average commuter operation. Each of the rooms has a private bathroom, making even the bunk-bed option look pretty fancy. There’s an observation car with an outdoor terrace where travelers can get some fresh air, have a drink, and watch the scenery go past. There’s also a piano bar and a spa on board.

A window seat in a luxury train car
Belmond

A double bed in a small train car
Belmond

A woman looks out over the rail of the train's observatory car toward a sunset over a lake.
Belmond

The high-altitude train rides take the form of either one- or two-night journeys around Cusco and Lake Titicaca, the continent’s biggest (and highest) lake. Rates start at $462 per person, including all meals. And yes, there’s an open bar.

The views look worth it.

[h/t Yatzer]

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