CLOSE

What to do with 66,000 business cards

Why, build a level three Menger Sponge, of course! What the heck is a Menger Sponge? Glad you asked. It's a three-dimensional fractcal cube of sorts, first described by Austrian mathematician Karl Menger in 1926. When, some seventy years later, Dr. Jeannine Mosely found herself confronted with a gargantuan pile of business cards, rendered useless after the company she worked for changed addresses, she knew what she had to do with them: hand-make a real, live Menger Sponge -- creating an actual object from something that had previously been merely a mathematical abstraction -- a (sorta nerdy) feat of Guinness Book proportions. Before we show you how she made one in reality, a quickie guide to making them in the abstract:

1. Begin with a cube.
2. Divide every face of the cube into 9 squares. This will sub-divide the cube into 27 smaller cubes, like a Rubik's Cube
3. Remove the cube at the middle of every face, and remove the cube in the center, leaving 20 cubes (second image). This is a Level 1 Menger sponge.
4. Repeat steps 1-3 for each of the remaining smaller cubes.

menger.jpg
66,048 business cards, 8,000 business card cubes (Menger subunits) and 150 pounds of cube later, it was finished. Figuring the whole project required about 600 hours to build, she recruited volunteers from around the country to build parts of it and then ship them to her. Construction photos after the jump!

First, you've got to make a cube from six business cards -- without staples, tape or glue -- which Dr. Mosely describes how to do:

To make a cube out of six business cards, first take two cards and place them across each other at right angles, centering them as nearly as possible. Fold the flaps of the bottom card down over the top card. Turn them over and repeat. Pull the two cards apart. Six of them can be assembled as shown below to make a cube. All flaps must be on the outside of the finished cube.

card.jpg

For a super-detailed (and kinda math-y) description of how Mosely accomplished the rest of her fractal feat, check out this page at the aptly-named Institute for Figuring. Meanwhile, we'll skip right to the pictures:
menger3.jpgmenger4.jpgmenger5.jpgPhoto by Ravi Ap

nextArticle.image_alt|e
arrow
video
Tips For Baking Perfect Cookies
5668610549001

Perfect cookies are within your grasp. Just grab your measuring cups and get started. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
entertainment
Netflix's Most-Binged Shows of 2017, Ranked
iStock
iStock

Netflix might know your TV habits better than you do. Recently, the entertainment company's normally tight-lipped number-crunchers looked at user data collected between November 1, 2016 and November 1, 2017 to see which series people were powering through and which ones they were digesting more slowly. By analyzing members’ average daily viewing habits, they were able to determine which programs were more likely to be “binged” (or watched for more than two hours per day) and which were more often “savored” (or watched for less than two hours per day) by viewers.

They found that the highest number of Netflix bingers glutted themselves on the true crime parody American Vandal, followed by the Brazilian sci-fi series 3%, and the drama-mystery 13 Reasons Why. Other shows that had viewers glued to the couch in 2017 included Anne with an E, the Canadian series based on L. M. Montgomery's 1908 novel Anne of Green Gables, and the live-action Archie comics-inspired Riverdale.

In contrast, TV shows that viewers enjoyed more slowly included the Emmy-winning drama The Crown, followed by Big Mouth, Neo Yokio, A Series of Unfortunate Events, GLOW, Friends from College, and Ozark.

There's a dark side to this data, though: While the company isn't around to judge your sweatpants and the chip crumbs stuck to your couch, Netflix is privy to even your most embarrassing viewing habits. The company recently used this info to publicly call out a small group of users who turned their binges into full-fledged benders:

Oh, and if you're the one person in Antarctica binging Shameless, the streaming giant just outed you, too.

Netflix broke down their full findings in the infographic below and, Big Brother vibes aside, the data is pretty fascinating. It even includes survey data on which shows prompted viewers to “Netflix cheat” on their significant others and which shows were enjoyed by the entire family.

Netflix infographic "The Year in Bingeing"
Netflix

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios