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Relief for Couch Potatoes, Canine Contraceptives and One Charmingly Alarming Solution

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Losing the remote is so last year with the new device that detects hand movements to control a television. Australian researchers have developed a box that can recognize seven different hand motions, from the thumbs up to an outstretched hand, to signal different commands for a television, DVD player or video recorder. The device supposedly works in any light and from a range of distances. Once the researchers get the box small enough to fit on a television, we'll finally be able to watch TV without all that hassle of actually lifting up a remote.

The iMartha

All those style-blind guys out there trying to match ties and shirts have help on the way. HP has announced a research project that would allow people to use their camera-phone to match colors. After sending a picture of themselves or an object they want to match, users will receive a text message a few minutes later with color recommendations. The pictures are processed and analyzed pixel-by-pixel for color value, erasing the effects of bad lighting. HP officials say the new tool will help women trying to buy makeup, but I can guarantee I'll use it almost every day to figure out what color shirt I should wear with my jeans.

Insert Tiger Woods pun here
caddyshack12.jpgMembership at your country club might get a little less exclusive if a team of American scientists has their way. They're advocating that golf courses be used as animal sanctuaries, since 70 percent of the well-manicured land isn't even used for playing. The greens are ideal places for animals, since they can be altered to mimic natural habitats and would be protected. On the other hand, this idea opens the door to all kinds of Caddyshack gopher-style animal hijinx.

PLUS: An Argentinian Snowfall, An Alarmingly Good Idea and Confidence via FDA-approved Nose Candy after the jump.

Snow in Buenos Aires?!
I'll admit, after living my entire life up north where winters are cold and snow is common, I can't empathize with people who joyfully greet every flurry by trying to have a snowball fight. But even my heart was warmed by the story of Buenos Aires getting its first taste of snow in almost 90 years. There have been cold temperatures plaguing Argentina since May, but a moisture-laden system moving in caused the snowfall on Argentina's Independence Day, the city's first since 1918. Sure, the story is dampened by the 23 deaths from exposure to cold, the energy crisis that has hit the country in light of the cool temperatures and the knowledge that this is just more evidence of how screwy our weather system has become, but the thought of Argentine children making snow angels is too much to not be happy.

nasal spray.jpgBoost Your Confidence, Via Nose
We've all been told that the best way to get over a fear of public speaking is to imagine everyone in their underwear. Apparently, the second-best way is a confidence-boosting nasal spray. Australian researchers developed the spray, which releases oxytocin into the bloodstream. In tests of 70 men and women, the drug was shown to reduce shyness in stressful social situations. Following large-scale tests, the spray should be commercially available in five years, so shy guys will finally have the courage to talk to girls at the bar after putting a little something up their nose. Sounds like a totally novel idea that will do great in the 1980s.

Neuter no more
Until now, dog birth control has been pretty one-sided; it's either neuter or nothing. But now an Australian company has unveiled a contraceptive implant for use in male dogs that will curb testosterone for months at a time, leaving a less permanent and relatively more comfortable alternative. The implant controls the hormone linked to testosterone production, not only killing the dog's sex drive, but also relaxing his aggressive behavior. Dogs aren't quite out of the water yet; the company still urges neutering as the best option if the owners don't want any breeding.

Picture 13.pngIsn't it time you gave her a ring?
Don't worry, I'm not talking about proposing. Since I reward myself for enduring the obnoxious buzz of my alarm clock with five more minutes of sleep, I think I might be in line for this sleek alarm from Yanko Design. The alarm is actually a ring that can be programmed to vibrate at a certain time. The vibrations of the ring then awake you in a manner slightly less jarring than the blaring horn of most clocks. This innovative alarm is especially useful for the hearing-impaired and couples waking up at different times.

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Courtesy Murdoch University
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Animals
Australian Scientists Discover First New Species of Sunfish in 125 Years
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Courtesy Murdoch University

Scientists have pinpointed a whole new species of the largest bony fish in the world, the massive sunfish, as we learned from Smithsonian magazine. It's the first new species of sunfish proposed in more than 125 years.

As the researchers report in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, the genetic differences between the newly named hoodwinker sunfish (Mola tecta) and its other sunfish brethren was confirmed by data on 27 different samples of the species collected over the course of three years. Since sunfish are so massive—the biggest can weigh as much as 5000 pounds—they pose a challenge to preserve and store, even for museums with large research collections. Lead author Marianne Nyegaard of Murdoch University in Australia traveled thousands of miles to find and collected genetic data on sunfish stranded on beaches. At one point, she was asked if she would be bringing her own crane to collect one.

Nyegaard also went back through scientific literature dating back to the 1500s, sorting through descriptions of sea monsters and mermen to see if any of the documentation sounded like observations of the hoodwinker. "We retraced the steps of early naturalists and taxonomists to understand how such a large fish could have evaded discovery all this time," she said in a press statement. "Overall, we felt science had been repeatedly tricked by this cheeky species, which is why we named it the 'hoodwinker.'"

Japanese researchers first detected genetic differences between previously known sunfish and a new, unknown species 10 years ago, and this confirms the existence of a whole different type from species like the Mola mola or Mola ramsayi.

Mola tecta looks a little different from other sunfish, with a more slender body. As it grows, it doesn't develop the protruding snout or bumps that other sunfish exhibit. Similarly to the others, though, it can reach a length of 8 feet or more. 

Based on the stomach contents of some of the specimens studied, the hoodwinker likely feeds on salps, a jellyfish-like creature that it probably chomps on (yes, sunfish have teeth) during deep dives. The species has been found near New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and southern Chile.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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Gregory H. Revera, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
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Space
Study Suggests There's Water Beneath the Moon's Surface
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Gregory H. Revera, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Astronauts may not need to go far to find water outside Earth. As CNN reports, Brown University scientists Ralph E. Milliken and Shuai Li suspect there are significant amounts of water churning within the Moon’s interior.

Their findings, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, lean on the discovery of glass beads encased in the Moon’s volcanic rock deposits. As recently as 100 million years ago, the Earth’s moon was a hotbed of volcanic activity. Evidence of that volatile time can still be found in the ancient ash and volcanic rock that’s scattered across the surface.

Using satellite imagery, the researchers identified tiny water droplets preserved inside glass beads that formed in the volcanic deposits. While water makes up a small fraction of each bead, its presence suggests there’s significantly more of it making up the Moon’s mantle.

Milliken and Li aren't the first scientists to notice water in lunar rocks. In 2008, volcanic materials collected from the Moon during the Apollo missions of 1971 and 1972 were revealed to contain the same water-flecked glass beads that the Brown scientists made the basis of their recent study. They took their research further by analyzing images captured across the face of the Moon and quickly saw the Apollo rocks represented a larger trend. "The distribution of these water-rich deposits is the key thing," Milliken said in a press statement. "They're spread across the surface, which tells us that the water found in the Apollo samples isn't a one-off. Lunar pyroclastics seem to be universally water-rich, which suggests the same may be true of the mantle."

The study challenges what we know about the Moon's formation, which scientists think occurred when a planet-sized object slammed into the Earth 4.5 billion years ago. "The growing evidence for water inside the Moon suggests that water did somehow survive, or that it was brought in shortly after the impact by asteroids or comets before the Moon had completely solidified," Li said. "The exact origin of water in the lunar interior is still a big question."

The findings also hold exciting possibilities for the future of space travel. NASA scientists have already considered turning the Moon into a water station for astronauts on their way to Mars. If water on the celestial body is really as abundant as the evidence may suggest, figuring out how to access that resource will definitely be on NASA's agenda.

[h/t CNN]

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