The world's most expensive homes

Who says the real estate market is cooling off? Just this week in Beverly Hills (predictably, perhaps), the highest asking price ever was set for a home newly on the market -- formerly the LA residence of newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst (that's right, Citizen Kane himself). Boasting 29 bedrooms, three swimming pools, tennis courts, its own movie theater and a nightclub, the six acre estate is going for $165 million. It joins the upper echelon of an elite club of uber-expensive homes around the world, including Saudi Arabian Prince Bandar's ranch compound in Aspen, going for $135 million (no takers yet).

updown court.jpgFormerly in first place is the never-lived-in English estate Updown Court ($139 million), just down the street from Windsor Castle and featuring such amenities as a heated marble driveway and an indoor bowling alley. (These all sound like great locations for a reenactment of The Shining, if you ask me.)

trump.jpgAt number four, going for a mere $125 million, is Donald Trump's latest investment. It's a ritzy Palm Beach, Florida palace whimsically named "Maison de L'Amitie," and in addition to the usual luxuries (conservatory, 100-foot swimming pool), claims an astounding 475 feet of private beachfront.

Easily the world's most expensive apartment, Manhattan's Pierre Hotel penthouse has 20-foot-high French doors, a ballroom, a wine cellar, a black marble staircase and a paneled library. (My apartment has a patio ...) Asking price: $70 mil.penthouse.jpg

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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