The "New" Wonders of the World

Ever wonder what all the fuss about these "seven wonders" is over? After all, it's pretty darn subjective -- the original Greek list of "wonders," most of which were destroyed by earthquakes and fires more than a thousand years ago, were all clustered around the Mediterranean; hardly a comprehensive study. What's more, "wonders" is translated from the Greek "theamata," the meaning of which is closer to "must-sees," which sounds more like a Travel Channel special (Top Ten Vegas Hotel Pools!) than something requiring an exhaustive proto-religious hejira to experience. But we continue to compile such lists, most recently alast week's "New Seven Wonders."

After a years-long international online vote, 200 potential candidates were whittled down to 21 finalists, including the usual suspects plus surprises like the most photographed building in Germany, Neuschwanstein Castle; the city of Timbuktu and the Statue of Liberty (yeah, it's impressive, but can it really stack up to the Pyramids of Giza?). The only real surprise on the list of seven winners was the sort-of-recently constructed statue of Christ the Redeemer which famously overlooks Rio de Janeiro; again, it's worth a daytrip, but it's not Machu Picchu or the ancient city of Petra! You can check out the winners here, and tell us what you think.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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