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Inbox Zero: Inbox Currently at 100

Two weeks ago I started on a journey to Inbox Zero, using Merlin Mann's tips for managing your email. After living with the tips in practice, I'm...getting there. My inbox went from 222 to an even 100 messages. I'll explain a few of the techniques I used to get there, and what's next to get to zero.

Separate work and personal messages - I have long had separate accounts for work and personal stuff, but I have always read them merged together in a single inbox. The first thing I did was start using Apple Mail's ability to view each email account as an independent mailbox. This helped me focus on the personal email messages and manage them faster than the piles of work stuff. I also made the decision to forward only personal messages to my iPhone, which emphasizes the importance of actually using this mailbox for personal correspondence.

Set up a few filters - I get a lot of email messages from an automated bug tracking system as work -- up to a few hundred messages a day. Previously this all went directly into my inbox, which required constant triage to read and delete (or act upon) all of it. Even if I didn't need to act on them, the messages were sitting there, looking at me, asking for attention. By automatically filtering this stuff to a separate folder, it reduced the volume level in my inbox -- since these automated messages were no longer in my face, I was able to devote dedicated attention (Merlin calls these sessions dashes) to managing this particular kind of message in its own mode (which involves a lot of skimming and deleting). The unsurprising truth: I don't need to act on (or know about) this stuff right away. If I ignore it for a while, most of it will be resolved by someone else, and I can just review what happened later on. This saves my attention for things that do make it into my actual inbox, that need me. The lesson here: save your inbox for things that are actually your job; if you're just getting messages to be informed, put them somewhere else.

Don't check as often - I set my desktop email application to check for new messages every thirty minutes any my iPhone every hour (and I wish there was a two-hour setting). Previously the desktop was checking every ten minutes. This significantly increases the span of time I can spend working on a task without being interrupted by the "new mail" sound, and getting curious about what's lurking under that icon. A related principle here is turn off the email application -- just quit it when you're doing something focused. I have gotten pretty good at this. The scary thing is, when I come back I'll have thirty more messages -- but this is actually good, because I can deal with those messages on their own terms, rather than in the middle of my other important work.

Delete stale, non-actionable items - This is where I need to do more work. There are still scores of messages from six to ten months before that really aren't actionable. Many are links I'm supposed to read -- which can be filed in a "to read" folder -- and many simply aren't relevant: projects that fizzled out and probably won't come back. I need to get up the courage to delete (or in my packrat case, file) all this stuff, so it's not sitting there in my inbox making me feel guilty.

Perhaps in another two weeks I'll be closer to my goal of Inbox Zero!

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Hate Waiting at Baggage Claim? Here's How to Make Sure Your Suitcase Arrives First
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Air travel involves plenty of waiting, from standing in long security lines to preparing for takeoff. And even after you land, your trip is stalled until you locate your luggage on the carousel. Luckily for impatient fliers, there are several ways to game the system and ensure a speedy suitcase delivery once you step off the plane, according to Travel + Leisure.

To score true VIP luggage treatment, ask the representative behind the check-in counter if they can attach a “fragile” sticker to your bag. Suitcases with these kinds of labels are often loaded last and unloaded first. (Plus, they receive the type of kid-glove treatment that ultimately helps them last longer.)

Keep in mind, however, that you’ll need a new tag each time you fly. If it looks old, or was issued by a different airline, the crew might not pay attention to it, according to Condé Nast Traveler. Also, consider upping your suitcase game, as quality, hard-shell bags look like they contain delicate or important items. Their appearance—along with the fragile sticker—will inspire baggage handlers to give them special treatment.

Another trick that can shave a few minutes off your wait time is making sure you're the last person to check in, instead of rushing to be first. If you can't resist getting to the airport early, try asking if you can check it at the gate. This could make your bag one of the last on the plane, and thus one of the first taken out. This method isn't surefire, however, as loading and unloading systems vary among flights.

And if all else fails, Thrillist advises that you try upgrading your flight. Some airlines give priority to bags that belong to elite travelers and business class, meaning they’ll be stored separately from other luggage and come out first. Good luck! No matter what happens, at least you can't have it worse than the lady who had to wait 20 years for her bag to show up.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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Use Wi-Fi? Your Device Is at Risk in the Latest Security Breach
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Another day, another way our personal data is being compromised. This time, the latest threat to your credit card numbers, social security information, and other personal data comes from a more-than-ubiquitous source: your Wi-Fi.

As Ars Technica and The Independent report, a computer security researcher has discovered a major issue with Wi-Fi that can be used to decrypt your data. The vulnerability is the result of weakness in the WPA2 protocol that secures modern Wi-Fi networks. Hackers can steal sensitive data that has been decrypted using a method called KRACK, or Key Reinstallation Attacks. While we can't know yet if hackers have actually taken advantage of the vulnerability, its existence puts every Wi-Fi-enabled device at risk.

“If your device supports Wi-Fi, it is most likely affected,” Mathy Vanhoef, the Belgium-based researcher who discovered the exploit, said. That means your phone, your computer, and even your Wi-Fi light bulbs. The hacker only needs to be within range of your Wi-Fi—not logged into your network—to take advantage of it and steal your data. However, Ars Technica reports that Android and Linux users are more vulnerable to severe attacks than Windows or iOS users.

What should I do to protect myself?

Unfortunately, changing your passwords won’t help this time around. All you can do is wait for security updates for your devices. In the meantime, treat every Wi-Fi connection like it’s the public network at Starbucks. As in, don’t go sharing all your personal data. You can make yourself safer by using a VPN. According to cybersecurity expert Robert Graham, these kind of attacks can’t defeat VPNs.

Most companies will no doubt be releasing security patches to fix this issue ASAP, so keep a look out for any available updates.

[h/t The Independent]

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