CLOSE
Original image

Funding for niche scholars...

Original image

Financing one's education can be a frustrating nexus of half and full nelsons. If you're lucky, you'll graduate hungover and delivered into the patient, staid lap of Ms. Sallie Mae. But maybe you won't owe Ms. Mae and her general aegis as much if you can just score one of these unusual scholarships. When I was mired in high school, I never qualified for the ones that were offered to me as an afterthought in my father's employee benefits manual (i.e. I wasn't quite callused or left-brained enough for Maritime Academy). Alas. But here are some highlights of FinAid's weird scholarship index:

  • The National Make It Yourself with Wool Competition, which will award prizes of $1 & $2k "based on the appropriateness to the contestant's lifestyle, coordination of fabric/yarn with garment style and design, contestant's presentation, and creativity."
  • The Duck Brand Duct Tape Stuck at Prom Contest, which rewards teens who attend their proms, yes, attired completely in duct tape: "The winning couple will be selected based on a variety of criteria, including originality, workmanship, quantity of Duck Tape used, use of colors, and creative use of accessories."
  • The J.D. Salinger Award, given to an incoming freshman at Ursinus College, J.D.'s alma mater, and: "Candidates must be nominated by a high school teacher or guidance counselor for their 'quirky brilliance'." And! "The winner will also get to live in the same dorm room previously occupied by Mr. Salinger."
  • Ok, this one is restricted to the barely-tween set, but it's funny & the winner gets $10,000: The Jif Most Creative Peanut Butter Sandwich Contest

Anyone out there a recipient of a fringe scholarship you'd like to share?

Original image
MasterClass
arrow
entertainment
Attention Aspiring Filmmakers: Martin Scorsese Is Teaching an Online Class
Original image
MasterClass

Since launching his career 50 years ago, Martin Scorsese has inspired countless fans to get into the moviemaking business. Now aspiring directors looking for a place to start can receive guidance from the legendary director himself. Beginning early next year, Martin Scorsese will lead his own filmmaking course through the online education platform MasterClass.

MasterClass is best known for offering classes taught by instructors who have already risen to the top of their respective fields. An architecture course from Frank Gehry, a music composition course from Hans Zimmer, and a tennis course from Serena Williams are just a few of the listings in the catalog. The company has also recruited several famous filmmakers in the past, including Aaron Sorkin and Werner Herzog, but Scorsese—the iconic director behind such classics as Taxi Driver (1976), Raging Bull (1980), and Goodfellas (1990) is in a league of his own.

Scorsese’s MasterClass includes more than 20 video lessons that pupils will be able to watch at their desired pace. They will also have the chance to upload their own videos and receive feedback from classmates, with Scorsese answering select questions.

"I was excited by this project because it gave me a chance to pass down my own inspirations and experiences and practices and evolutions,” the Oscar-winning director said in a release. “It was so important for me to have people that passed down their own knowledge when I was young, and MasterClass has given me an opportunity to try it myself.”

Prospective students can pre-enroll for $90 today to receive unlimited access to the course when it goes live in 2018.

Original image
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
Graduates in These States Fare Best When It Comes to Student Debt
Original image
iStock

Student loan debt in the U.S. grows larger each year. According to CNBC, the average American in their 20s with student loans to pay off owes about $22,135. But college graduates from some states have it easier than those from others. As Money reports, choosing the right state in which to get your education may end up saving you $16,000 in loan payments.

That number comes from the latest student debt study [PDF] from the Institute for College Access and Success. The organization looked at four-year public and private nonprofit colleges to determine the states where debt levels skew low and where they creep into $30,000-plus territory. Graduates who study in Utah have it the best: 57 percent of students there graduate without debt, and those who have debt carry burdens of $19,975 on average. Behind Utah are New Mexico, California, Arizona, and Nevada, all with average debt loads of less than $25,000 a student.

On the opposite end of the spectrum is New Hampshire, where new graduates are sent into the workforce with $36,367 in debt looming over their heads. Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, and Minnesota all produce average student debts between $31,000 and $36,000. And though graduates from West Virginia don't owe the most money, they are the most likely to owe any money at all, with 77 percent of students from the state racking up some amount of debt. The variation from state to state can be explained by the types of colleges that are popular in each region. The Northeast, for example, is home to some of the country's priciest private colleges, while students in the West are more likely to attend a public state school with lower tuition.

If you've already received a degree from an expensive school in a high-debt state, you can't go back in time and change your decision. But you can get smart about tackling the debt you've already accumulated. Check out these debt-busting strategies to see if one is right for your situation.

[h/t Money]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios