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Technological (Geek) Cakes

Geek cakes seem to fall into four main categories: 1. cakes that resemble computers, game consoles, and other gadgets, 2. cakes that illustrate one's geeky obsession, 3. cakes that are made by strange technological methods, and 4. cakes that incorporate technology into the finished product.

1. Cakes that look like gadgets. When Miles turned 15, he received a Mac Mini cake, and a Mac Mini, too!

Check out this iPhone cake Flickr user icruise received for his birthday.
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There are more cakes made to resemble game consoles, computers, and iPods at YesButNoButYes. This gallery is a little heavy on Apple, but that's OK, I like apple cakes. Other categories of geek cakes, after the jump.

2. Cakes that reflect a geek's favorite pastime include this Star Wars cake recently featured on Boing Boing. It depicts Max Rebo, the keyboardist in Jabba's palace band. With illustrated steps. Also see the Death Star cake and the Mustafar cake.
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Dr. Who fans might prefer this chocolate Dalek cake, created by Flickr user Brainless Angel. Flickr has a collection of Dr. Who cakes.
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Kassy made this awesome Super Mario cake. It was featured at Game Cakes, where you'll find many more imaginative gaming-themed cakes.
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Pimp That Snack! has step-by-step instructions for creating your own Rubik's Cube Cake! Or you could have one made by a professional.
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3. Highly intelligent, technologically-minded people (geeks) cook, too, but sometimes by specialized methods. Colin at Instructables made this cake with intricately-designed edges by using a laser cutter.
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4. Then there are cakes that do things. Dave Spencer at Instructables made a volcano cake for his son's birthday. This cake had vibration, smoke, sound effects, and a lava flow (strawberry flavored)! It required seven boxes of cake mix. Then he posted the process of building the cake, hardware and all, and a video of the cake in action at the birthday party.
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Believe it or not, I'm hungry now.

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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