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Image Macros: Oddballs and Advanced Forms

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Throughout the week, I've looked at Image Macros: Intro to LOL Cats, "Invisible" LOL Cats, "I Can Has Cheezburger?" LOL Cats, and I'm in Your X, Y'ing Your Z. Today the series wraps up with some unusual Image Macros that have caught my eye.

"Bucket" Image Macros are based on this deeply evocative two-panel image:

It loses a bit when scaled down like this -- check out a larger image at ihasabucket.com. (You know you've got a successful Image Macro when your entire site is just the image.) Also note that "Bucket" Image Macros are sometimes called "LOLrus" after the walrus (sea lion?) in this image.

More unusual (and awesome) Image Macros after the jump.

ROFL WafflePictured at left is a true Image Macro, from the Wikipedia page on Image Macros -- this is the ROFL Waffle. This image can be used in place of a typical text-based "ROFL" (Rolling On [the] Floor Laughing) text reply, to liven things up. Also recommended for waffle fans. (See also: Waffle House Fun Facts.)

Do Not Want is a genre of Image Macros based on incorrect subtitles in a pirated DVD version of Star Wars: Episode III (read the whole, long story) -- in a scene where Darth Vader yells "Nooooo!" the DVD subtitles read: "Do not want." Animals seem not to want lots of things, most notably fruits and vegetables. Here are some examples:

Do Not Want Dog

Do Not Want Cat

Relevant to My Interests has something to do with animals posting on web forums. (I'd like to see which forums are truly relevant to their interests, actually.) See:

Relevant Cat

Relevant Hedgehog

Relevant Dog

And, finally, here's a treat. Fine Art Image Macros add text to famous paintings for a bizarre cross-century artistic mashup. For example:

Dis Bot

Okay, one more, which seems to somehow tie all this together. Historical Image Macros:

Hat/Cheezburger

Well, I hope you've enjoyed this week of Image Macros -- I sure have! Special thanks to all those who created these images...whoever you are.

This article is part of a series. Read the rest:

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Design
This Amazing Clock Has a Different Hand for Every Minute of the Day
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iStock

In the video below, you can watch Japanese ad agency Dentsu transform passing time into art. According to Adweek, the project was commissioned by Japanese stationery brand Hitotoki, which produces crafting materials. To celebrate the value of handmade items in an increasingly fast-paced world, Dentsu created a film advertisement for their client depicting their goods as a stop-motion clock.

The timepiece ticks off all 1440 minutes in the day, and was assembled in real-time against a colored backdrop during a single 24-hour take. Its "hands" were crafted from different combinations of some 30,000 disparate small items, including confetti, cream puffs, tiny toys, silk leaves, and sunglasses.

"In a world where everything is so hectic and efficient, we wanted to bring the value of 'handmade' to life," explains Dentsu art director Ryosuke Miyashita in a press statement quoted by Stash Media. "We created different combinations of small Hitotoki brand items to express each and every minute."

You can check out a promotional video for the project below, which details the arduous crafting process, or view a real-time version of the clock here.

[h/t Adweek]

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architecture
Take a Look at These Tiny, Futuristic Homes From the 1960s
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If you find yourself in Friche de l’Escalette, a sculpture park in Marseille, France, this year, you may feel like there’s been some kind of alien invasion among the industrial ruins scattered throughout the park. The institution’s latest exhibition, Utopie Plastic, features three retro-futuristic houses from the 1960s that look straight out of The Jetsons.

As Curbed reports, the prefabricated houses are stocked with mid-century plastic furniture like Quasar Khahn’s inflatable chair.

The rounded interior of a Futuro home with two experimental retro chairs inside.

The show includes one of the Futuro homes, spaceship-like tiny houses originally designed as ski chalets by architect Matti Suuronen. At the time, they cost only $12,000 to $14,000, and could be built on any terrain because of their stilt legs.

A Maison Bulle à Six Coques home lights up with a blue glow at night in the sculpture park.

You can also view Maison Bulle à Six Coques, a flower-shaped hut (its name means Six-Shell Bubble House) by French architect Jean Maneval. The prototype design was first introduced at an art fair in 1956, and went into production in 1968. It came in green, white, or brown, and later inspired an entire vacation village in the Pyrenees, where developers built 20 Bubble Houses.

A modular Hexacube house is lit up at twilight.

And then there’s Georges Candilis and Anja Blamsfeld's 1972 Hexacube design, a modular polyester and fiberglass hut that looked kind of like a giant Port-a-Potty. Multiple Hexacubes could be combined together to make a larger house, and they ushered in a new era of modular, expandable construction.

The era of plastic tiny houses like these came to an end during the 1970s, when the oil crisis in the U.S. made plastic prohibitively expensive—at least for people who were looking for prefab houses on the cheap.

The exhibit is open by appointment until October 1, 2017.

[h/t Curbed]

All images © C. Baraja, courtesy Friche de l’Escalette

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