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What's a Hoya?

This post would be more relevant had Georgetown beaten Ohio State on Saturday night and won the National Championship yesterday. But I'm still not exactly sure what a Hoya is.

Chuck Klosterman, blogging from the Final Four for ESPN, had this to say:

The nickname "Hoya" derives from the Greek and Latin phrase "Hoya Saxa," which loosely translates as "What Rocks!" This is apparently a reference to the stones that comprise the outer wall of Georgetown University. Clearly, these rocks are awesome: As of this afternoon, the college has never been overtaken by nomadic hordes. I'm not sure how rocks equate with a bulldog; maybe bulldogs like to eat rocks. I'm no zoologist.

HoyaSaxa.com has a different explanation:

The official explanation holds that there was a baseball team at Georgetown called the "Stonewalls." It is suggested that a student, applying Greek and Latin, dubbed the team the hoia saxa "“ hoia is the Greek neuter plural for "what" or "what a," while saxa is the Latin neuter plural for "rock". Substituting a "y" for an "i"; "hoya saxa" literally means "what rocks."

Um, right. We must have some Georgetown alums in the audience who want to weigh in and set this straight.

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Don't Have Space For a Christmas Tree? Decorate a Pineapple Instead
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Christmas trees aren't for everyone. Some people can't fit a fir inside their cramped abodes, while others are turned off by the expense, or by the idea of bugs hitchhiking their way inside. Fake trees are always an option, but a new trend sweeping Instagram—pineapples as mini-Christmas "trees"—might convince you to forego the forest vibe for a more tropical aesthetic.

As Thrillist reports, the pineapple-as-Christmas-tree idea appears to have originated on Pinterest before it, uh, ripened into a social media sensation. Transforming a pineapple into a Halloween “pumpkin” requires carving and tea lights, but to make the fruit festive for Christmas all one needs are lights, ornaments, swaths of garland, and any other tiny tchotchkes that remind you of the holidays. The final result is a tabletop decoration that's equal parts Blue Hawaii and Miracle on 34th Street.

In need of some decorating inspiration? Check out a variety of “Christmas tree” pineapples below.

[h/t Thrillist]

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