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Learn Via Podcast

We've covered free stuff on the iTunes Store before, including some higher education content. But did you know there's a whole directory of educational podcasts, including higher education content?

Unlike the "sold by the store but free" content we mentioned last time, these podcasts should be available worldwide, not just in the US. Your humble blogger recommends Grammar Girl's Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing (yes, this is the second time we've plugged this podcast) and TED Talks (video) (an audio version is also available).

Do you have a favorite educational podcast?

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How Investing Just $100 Per Month Can Give Your Nest Egg a Serious Boost
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If you have $100 to spare, you may want to consider investing it instead of spending it immediately. Later down the road, your frugality will be rewarded with a nice chunk of cash that you can use when you retire.

Start investing today and a $60,000 investment could turn into a nest egg of $522,000 in 50 years, according to an analysis by The Motley Fool, a financial services company. Even if you don’t have half a century to wait, a $12,000 investment will grow an extra $5700 over the course of 10 years, netting you $17,700. Not a bad return for just $100 a month.

What this all comes down to is compound interest, which is essentially earning interest on top of interest. Calculating that the market returns about 7 percent per year, adjusted for inflation, The Motley Fool explains what this would mean for someone who invests $100 a month:

“That means the $1,200 you invest in year one will be worth $84 more in year two. When year three rolls around, that original sum will gain even more—roughly $90—because the interest from the previous year will grow as well. That might seem like small stuff, but over time, the effects can be astounding.”

You can see this at work with bank accounts that pay interest, but compounding also affects other types of investments, like stocks. Many stocks have dividends, which are payments corporations disburse to investors each quarter—say, 50 cents per share. When you receive dividends, you can reinvest that money, using it to buy new stock shares. Each of those new shares then pays its own dividend, growing your money exponentially over time.

However, the financial service agency says you shouldn’t start investing until you’ve paid off all high-interest debt—like credit card debt—and established an emergency fund with enough money to cover your basic expenses for three months if you happened to lose your job. Once that's settled, you can start putting some of your extra earnings into an investment account, like a 401(k) or IRA. (The company also offers some tips on how to set up a brokerage account, and how to figure out which type of account is best for you.)

Ready to start building up that nest egg? Check out Mental Floss’s 15-minute guide to how you can start investing today.

[h/t The Motley Fool]

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How to Delete Your Netflix History So No One Knows What You've Been Binging
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Netflix's viewing history is useful if you're watching a series and just want to go straight to the next episode the minute you log on, but it can be a little awkward if you're sharing your account. You may not want the rest of your family—or Netflix's recommendation engines—to know what you've been up to. But there's a solution that will allow you to binge freely: LifeHacker informs us that you can delete items from your Netflix history.

The process is quite simple. If you need to conceal, say, your deep descent into a full-series binge of Gossip Girl, go to your Viewing Activity on Netflix. If you go to Settings, you'll see it near the bottom of the page under My Profile, or you can go straight to it here.

A viewing history on Netflix shows that someone has been watching many, many episodes of 'Friends.'
This is my viewing history and I'm not ashamed.
Screenshot, Netflix

A list of your viewing history will come up, with every show and episode you've watched (or started watching) in chronological order. Click the black X on the right-hand side to remove an episode. If it's a series, you'll have the option to remove the whole series from your history.

This will keep the show from appearing in your search results, but it doesn't take effect immediately. It can take up to 24 hours to scrub from your profile across all devices.

Whether you're trying to cover your tracks after a little bit of Netflix cheating, or just get the site to stop showing you recommendations based on that one time your roommate's boyfriend went through an anime phase, go ahead and hit that delete button.

[h/t LifeHacker]

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