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Playing With Food

Mothers keep telling their children not to play with their food. The reason is probably because mothers tend to eat a child's leftovers (been there, done that). Some children never grow out of this habit!

Joost Elffers and Saxton Freymann authored a series of children's books on food art beginning with Playing With Your Food. See a collection of Freymann's wonderful creations at Funny Stuff.

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In Asia, watermelon carvings are used for weddings and other special events the way ice sculture is used in the west. Japanese food artist Takashi Itoh is a master of watermelon carving. You can see a gallery his works at Watermelon Special Fruitcarving.

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Italian fruit sculptor Paolo Pachetti has a gallery with diagramsoutlining the fruits he used to create them, as well as instructional books and videos for sale.

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Famous faces were constructed from fries and pizza ingredients to celebrate British National Chip Week 2007. This is an image of soccer player Wayne Rooney. See more faces at Spluch.

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Comedian Amy Sedaris recently issued a chllenge for her viewers to make food cuter by adding googly eyes. The submissions are posted at Flickr.

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Renaissance man George Hart is an artist, teacher, and math geek. He decribes himself as "neither a professor of gastronomy nor paleontology, but I like cookies." His website features instructions for creating these Trilobite Cookies.

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Not that you'd want to encourage such a thing, but a German Burger King placemat has instructions for how to build a throne from your french friesand ketchup! I wonder how many "second orders" were sold because of this?

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The Museum of Food Anomalies has food that looks like other things naturally with no human intervention. This photo is labeled "the saddest pickled egg on record." What's even sadder is that it was eaten soon after the photo was taken.
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Pop Chart Lab
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Every Emoji Ever, Arranged by Color
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

What lies at the end of the emoji rainbow? It's not a pot of gold, but rather an exclamation point—a fitting way to round out the Every Emoji Ever print created by the design experts over at Pop Chart Lab.

As the name suggests, every emoji that's currently used in version 10.0.0 of Unicode is represented, which, if you're keeping track, is nearly 2400.

Each emoji was painstakingly hand-illustrated and arranged chromatically, starting with yellow and ending in white. Unicode was most recently updated last summer, with 56 emojis added to the family. Some of the newest members of the emoji clan include a mermaid, a couple of dinosaurs, a UFO, and a Chinese takeout box. However, the most popular emoji last year was the "despairing crying face." Make of that what you will.

Past posters from Pop Chart Lab have depicted the instruments played in every Beatles song, every bird species in North America, and magical objects of the wizarding world. The price of the Every Emoji Ever poster starts at $29, and if you're interested, the piece can be purchased here.

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Afternoon Map
8 City Maps Rendered in the Styles of Famous Artists
iStock
iStock

Vincent van Gogh once famously said, "I dream my painting and I paint my dream." If at some point in his career he had dreamed up a map of Amsterdam, where he lived and derived much of his inspiration from, it may have looked something like the one below.

In a blog post from March, Credit Card Compare selected eight cities around the world and illustrated what their maps might look like if they had been created by the famous artists who have roots there.

The Andy Warhol-inspired map of New York City, for instance, is awash with primary colors, and the icons representing notable landmarks are rendered in his famous Pop Art style. Although Warhol grew up in Pittsburgh, he spent much of his career working in the Big Apple at his studio, dubbed "The Factory."

Another iconic and irreverent artist, Banksy, is the inspiration behind London's map. Considering that the public doesn't know Banksy's true identity, he remains something of an enigma. His street art, however, is recognizable around the world and commands exorbitant prices at auction. In an ode to urban art, clouds of spray paint and icons that are a bit rough around the edges adorn this map of England's capital.

For more art-inspired city maps, scroll through the photos below.

[h/t Credit Card Compare]

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