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"As is painting, so is poetry"

This morning I discovered a flyer in my mailbox advertising "Wordsworth and Keats Fine Interior Housepainting: special attention paid to metre and rhyme." Part of me wanted to believe this was a real service, perhaps featuring painters who speak in couplets and scrawl secret verses on your walls before they slap up a coat of Benjamin Moore. Alas, the website the flyer lists turns out to be completely unrelated to poetry or paint. I guess the whole point was just to get people's attention, in which case, it worked.

Anyway, the slogan on the flyer was "They're tanned! They're rested!" Gimmick or not, surely we can do better than that? "From Daffodil Yellow to Grecian Urn Gray!" "If beauty were truth and walls could talk, ours would be totally honest!" "The external world is fitted to the mind -- but let us help you with the interiors!" Any more ideas? And hey, who can tell me, without Googling, whose quote I used for the title of this post?

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Bone Broth 101
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Whether you drink it on its own or use it as stock, bone broth is the perfect recipe to master this winter. Special thanks to the Institute of Culinary Education

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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