Tuesday Turnip

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It's time for another whimsical Tuesday Turnip search wherein I type a random phrase and we see what kind of interesting factoids "turn-up."

Today I typed in "was invented by" unearthing the following factoids:

Richard G. Drew (1899-1980) invented masking tape and clear adhesive tape (also called cellophane tape or Scotch tape). Drew was an engineer for the 3M company (the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing).

The safety pin was invented by Walter Hunt in 1849.

John Milne was the English seismologist and geologist who invented the first modern seismograph and promoted the building of seismological stations.

The slinky was invented by Richard and Betty James.

Rowland Hill invented the postage stamp in 1837, an act for which he was knighted.

In 1888, Marvin Stone patented the spiral winding process to manufacture the first paper drinking straws.

Around the year 1752, James Ayscough introduced his spectacles with lenses made of tinted glass.

The microwave oven was invented by accident, when Percy Spencer found that his chocolate bar had been melted by an experiment he was running on radar systems. He immediately started experimenting successfully on microwaved popcorn.

The first fax machine was invented by Scottish mechanic and inventor Alexander Bain. In 1843, Alexander Bain received a British patent for "improvements in producing and regulating electric currents and improvements in timepieces and in electric printing and signal telegraphs", in laymen's terms a fax machine.

The first aerosol can (a can than contains a propellant [a liquefied gas like flurocarbon] and has a spray nozzle) was invented in 1944 by Lyle David Goodloe and W.N. Sullivan. They were working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and were trying to find a way to spray and kill malaria carrying mosquitos during World War II for the soldiers overseas. The "clog-free" spray valve was invented by Robert H. Abplanal in 1953.

The modern puzzle was invented by an American, Howard Garns, in 1979 and published by Dell Magazines under the name "Number Place"[2]. It became popular in Japan in 1986, when it was published by Nikoli and given the name Sudoku. It became an international hit in 2005.

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February 6, 2007 - 3:08am
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