A corpse flower grows in Brooklyn

Hold your nose! Our favorite rare and giant plant, the corpse flower or Amorphophallus titanum, could burst forth and stink up the air as early as today at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden. A botanist once likened its fragrance to "a cross between ammonia fumes and hydrogen sulphide, suggestive of spoiled meat or rotting fish."

The flower was first discovered in Sumatra, its native terrain, in 1878 by Odoardo Beccari. It was an immediate sensation. An English artist assigned to illustrate the plant is said to have become ill from the odor, and governesses forbade young women from gazing upon its indelicate form. (Its formal name ends in "phallus" for good reason.)

You can watch an almost-live webcam of the plant threatening to flower here. (Thank goodness Smell-O-Vision didn't work out.) After the jump, an introduction to our other favorite bizarre plant, from our fact library.

Venus Fly Trap The Venus flytrap plant seems like it should be native to the rain forest or some other exotic location — but that's not the case. In fact, they are only found on the coastal plains of North and South Carolina.

Popular misconceptions about the Venus flytrap abound. Here are just a few:

* The plant can actively attack.

* The "trap" is a mouth that the plant uses to eat.

* The plant can keep a home clear of flies.

Here's the truth:

* Venus flytraps only capture prey small enough for them to catch, and certainly do not have the strength to harm any creature larger than a small insect. The traps only spring shut when tiny hairs on their insides are triggered; they do not freely move to "seek" prey.

* The "trap" part of the plant is in fact one of its leaves. Although it does distribute digestive juices to absorb nutrients from the prey it captures, it has no true mouth. After the trap has "sprung" four or five times, it wilts away and is soon replaced by a new leaf-trap.

* After being triggered falsely, it usually takes a full day for a trap to re-open. It can take a trap several days to digest an insect, which means that it's unlikely that it can do enough pest control in the average home to make a noticeable dent.

In the wild, the plant has become rare and anyone caught removing these plants from their natural habitat can be subject to heavy fines. Any Venus flytrap plants offered for sale should be grown privately in greenhouses or nurseries.

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Feeling Down? Lifting Weights Can Lift Your Mood, Too
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There’s plenty of research that suggests that exercise can be an effective treatment for depression. In some cases of depression, in fact—particularly less-severe ones—scientists have found that exercise can be as effective as antidepressants, which don’t work for everyone and can come with some annoying side effects. Previous studies have largely concentrated on aerobic exercise, like running, but new research shows that weight lifting can be a useful depression treatment, too.

The study in JAMA Psychiatry, led by sports scientists at the University of Limerick in Ireland, examined the results of 33 previous clinical trials that analyzed a total of 1877 participants. It found that resistance training—lifting weights, using resistance bands, doing push ups, and any other exercises targeted at strengthening muscles rather than increasing heart rate—significantly reduced symptoms of depression.

This held true regardless of how healthy people were overall, how much of the exercises they were assigned to do, or how much stronger they got as a result. While the effect wasn’t as strong in blinded trials—where the assessors don’t know who is in the control group and who isn’t, as is the case in higher-quality studies—it was still notable. According to first author Brett Gordon, these trials showed a medium effect, while others showed a large effect, but both were statistically significant.

The studies in the paper all looked at the effects of these training regimes on people with mild to moderate depression, and the results might not translate to people with severe depression. Unfortunately, many of the studies analyzed didn’t include information on whether or not the patients were taking antidepressants, so the researchers weren’t able to determine what role medications might play in this. However, Gordon tells Mental Floss in an email that “the available evidence supports that [resistance training] may be an effective alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for depressive symptoms that could be prescribed on its own and/or in conjunction with other depression treatments,” like therapy or medication.

There haven’t been a lot of studies yet comparing whether aerobic exercise or resistance training might be better at alleviating depressive symptoms, and future research might tackle that question. Even if one does turn out to be better than the other, though, it seems that just getting to the gym can make a big difference.

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