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The Missing Links: Kennedy's Secret Shelter

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Getty Images

2012 In Review: Mashable’s Best
It’s begun already. This is a good one though. Check out the Mashable stories you might have missed.

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Billboards Rock
The 70s featured a lot more rock & roll billboards.

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RIP: Hostess

Now we know why Twinkies are so hard to find in Zombieland. (Video contains NSFW language)

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Polygamist Rock
This community is built into a giant chunk of stone.

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Homestyle. Homemade. Wholesome. Hearty. Gourmet.
A lot of words used to label food are pretty meaningless. It seems like the word “Natural” should be easy to define, but apparently not.

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Off the Top of A Rapper’s Mind
How do the brains of freestyle rappers compare with everyone else’s?

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New Word of the Day: Cobwebsites
A word I just made up that combines cobweb and website to describe sites that have been lingering around the internet for a long, long time gathering dust. The Space Jam site was previously reported. Here are a bunch of others.

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The Christmas List Has Begun
I need a scanner mouse.

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Ready the Kennedy Doomsday Bunker
The end of the world next month might be a good time to try out JFK’s secret Florida shelter.

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Please feel free to tweet link suggestions to @ColinPerkins

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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