CLOSE
Original image

11 Facts from the American Museum of Natural History's New Food-Themed Exhibit

Original image


A hydrophonic vertical growing system, designed by Windowfarms, in the museum's Weston Pavilion. Photo Courtesy AMNH.

On November 17, the American Museum of Natural History will open a new exhibit, Our Global Kitchen, which examines how food is grown, modified, transported, tasted, and celebrated. "Food is intimately familiar to all of us—and experienced as a daily social ritual—but the complex global system that produces it has critical implications for the health of humans and of Earth's ecological systems," Ellen V. Futter, president of the museum, said at a preview of the exhibit. Visitors will get a chance to see what an Aztec market looked like, participate in tastings, sit at the tables of historical figures, examine various farming practices from around the globe, and learn how hunger and obesity exist side by side.

Here are 11 things we learned during our visit.

1. Five species of beans have been bred into approximately 40,000 varieties.

2. Cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, and kohlrabi are all actually the same species: Brassica oleracea.

3. In ancient Aztec markets, cocoa beans were currency, not candy. Thirty cacao beans would buy you a rabbit.

Photo Courtesy AMNH.

4. The bumps on your tongue, called papillae, aren't actually tastebuds—your tastebuds are actually inside those bumps. The more papillae you have, the better you're able to taste—in fact, if you have 30 or more papillae per quarter-inch, you're a super-taster!

5. In parts of Asia and the Middle East, sheep are bred to have fat tails that are so big that they have to be dragged in special carts.

6. Almost every apple you eat is cloned in a process called grafting—live branches from trees that produce sweet apples are attached to the trunks of other trees, which produce apples that are clones of the first tree.

7. Wild chickens like the Red Junglefowl produce approximately 15 eggs a year; domesticated chickens produce 200 to 300 eggs.

8. Americans didn’t start using forks until the mid-1800s,. Before that, they either stabbed food with knives, or ate with their hands. (Europeans adopted forks much earlier.)

9. Young oysters are called spat; 90 percent of Europe's oysters are raised in France at aquatic farms like the one shown in the diorama below.

10. One variety of potato was the primary food in Ireland before the potato famine. It was called the Lumper.

11. In high and middle income countries, each consumer wastes approximately 187 pounds of food each year. In low income countries, that number is 33 pounds.

Original image
Opening Ceremony
fun
arrow
These $425 Jeans Can Turn Into Jorts
May 19, 2017
Original image
Opening Ceremony

Modular clothing used to consist of something simple, like a reversible jacket. Today, it’s a $425 pair of detachable jeans.

Apparel retailer Opening Ceremony recently debuted a pair of “2 in 1 Y/Project” trousers that look fairly peculiar. The legs are held to the crotch by a pair of loops, creating a disjointed C-3PO effect. Undo the loops and you can now remove the legs entirely, leaving a pair of jean shorts in their wake. The result goes from this:

501069-OpeningCeremony2.jpg

Opening Ceremony

To this:

501069-OpeningCeremony3.jpg

Opening Ceremony

The company also offers a slightly different cut with button tabs in black for $460. If these aren’t audacious enough for you, the Y/Project line includes jumpsuits with removable legs and garter-equipped jeans.

[h/t Mashable]

Original image
iStock
fun
arrow
This First-Grade Math Problem Is Stumping the Internet
May 17, 2017
Original image
iStock

If you’ve ever fantasized about how much easier life would be if you could go back to elementary school, this math problem may give you second thoughts. The question first appeared on a web forum, Mashable reports, and after recently resurfacing, it’s been perplexing adults across social media.

According to the original poster AlmondShell, the bonus question was given to primary one, or first grade students, in Singapore. It instructs readers to “study the number pattern” and “fill in the missing numbers.” The puzzle, which comprises five numbers and four empty circles waiting to be filled in, comes with no further explanation.

Some forum members commented with their best guesses, while others expressed disbelief that this was a question on a kid’s exam. Commenter karrotguy illustrates one possible answer: Instead of looking for complex math equations, they saw that the figure in the middle circle (three) equals the amount of double-digit numbers in the surrounding quadrants (18, 10, 12). They filled out the puzzle accordingly.

A similar problem can be found on the blog of math enthusiast G.R. Burgin. His solution, which uses simple algebra, gets a little more complicated.

The math tests given to 6- and 7-year-olds in other parts of the world aren’t much easier. If your brain isn’t too worn out after the last one, check out this maddening problem involving trains assigned to students in the UK.

[h/t Mashable]

SECTIONS
BIG QUESTIONS
BIG QUESTIONS
JOB SECRETS
QUIZZES
WORLD WAR 1
SMART SHOPPING
STONES, BONES, & WRECKS
#TBT
THE PRESIDENTS
WORDS
RETROBITUARIES