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11 Badass Neil deGrasse Tyson Quotes

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Neil deGrasse Tyson is America's preeminent badass astrophysicist. He's a passionate advocate for science, NASA, and education. He's also well-known for a little incident involving Pluto. The man holds at least seventeen honorary doctorates in addition to his real one; we're dealing with a badass over here. Now, eleven of our favorite NDT quotes.

1. ON SCIENCE

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it." From Real Time with Bill Maher.

2. ON NASA FUNDING 

"As a fraction of your tax dollar today, what is the total cost of all spaceborne telescopes, planetary probes, the rovers on Mars, the International Space Station, the space shuttle, telescopes yet to orbit, and missions yet to fly?' Answer: one-half of one percent of each tax dollar. Half a penny. I’d prefer it were more: perhaps two cents on the dollar. Even during the storied Apollo era, peak NASA spending amounted to little more than four cents on the tax dollar." From Space Chronicles, p. 25.

3. ON GOD AND HURRICANES

"Once upon a time, people identified the god Neptune as the source of storms at sea. Today we call these storms hurricanes.... The only people who still call hurricanes acts of God are the people who write insurance forms." From Death by Black Hole, p. 361.

4. ON THE BENEFITS OF TECHNOLOGY INVENTED FOR USE IN SPACE 

On the benefits of technology invented for use in space: "... Countless women are alive today because of ideas stimulated by a design flaw in the Hubble Space Telescope." (Editor's note: technology used to repair the Hubble Space Telescope's optical problems led to improved technology for breast cancer detection.) From Space Chronicles, p. 24.

5. ON THE DEMOTION OF PLUTO FROM PLANET STATUS 

Image credit: PBS

"I knew Pluto was popular among elementary schoolkids, but I had no idea they would mobilize into a 'Save Pluto' campaign. I now have a drawer full of hate letters from hundreds of elementary schoolchildren (with supportive cover letters from their science teachers) pleading with me to reverse my stance on Pluto. The file includes a photograph of the entire third grade of a school posing on their front steps and holding up a banner proclaiming, 'Dr. Tyson—Pluto is a Planet!'" From The Sky Is Not the Limit, Kindle locations 1537-1540.

6. ON THE CLIMAX OF THE MOVIE "TITANIC"

Titanic // 20th Century Fox

"In the movie, the stars above the ship bear no correspondence to any constellations in a real sky. Worse yet, while the heroine bobs... we are treated to her view of this Hollywood sky—one where the stars on the right half of the scene trace the mirror image of the stars in the left half. How lazy can you get?" From Death by Black Hole, p. 330.

7. ON DEATH BY ASTEROID

"On Friday the 13th, April 2029, an asteroid large enough to fill the Rose Bowl as though it were an egg cup will fly so close to Earth that it will dip below the altitude of our communication satellites. We did not name this asteroid Bambi. Instead, we named it Apophis, after the Egyptian god of darkness and death." From Space Chronicles, p. 53.

8. ON THE MOTIVATIONS BEHIND AMERICA'S MOONSHOT

Duffman via Wiki Commons 

"[L]et us not fool ourselves into thinking we went to the Moon because we are pioneers, or discoverers, or adventurers. We went to the Moon because it was the militaristically expedient thing to do." From The Sky Is Not the Limit, p. 70.

9. ON WHO NAMED THE STARS 

"After the 9/11 attacks, when President George W. Bush, in a speech aimed at distinguishing the U.S. from the Muslim fundamentalists, said, 'Our God is the God who named the stars.' The problem is two-thirds of all the stars that have names, have Arabic names. I don't think he knew this. This would confound the point that he was making." From The Amazing Meeting Keynote Speech, 2008.

10. ON 2012 APOCALYPSE PREDICTIONS

Mad Max: Fury Road // Warner Bros.

On 2012 apocalypse predictions: "There's no greater sign of the failure of the American educational system than the extent to which Americans are distracted by the possibility that Earth might end on December 21, 2012. It's a profound absence of awareness of the laws of physics and how nature works. So they're missing some science classes in their training in high school or in college that would empower [them] to understand and to judge when someone else is basically just full of it. Science is like an inoculation against charlatans who would have you believe whatever it is they tell you." On Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, June 24, 2009.

11. PRACTICAL ADVICE IN THE EVENT OF ALIEN CONTACT 

E.T. // Universal Studios

Practical advice in the event of alien contact: "[I]f an alien lands on your front lawn and extends an appendage as a gesture of greeting, before you get friendly, toss it an eightball. If the appendage explodes, then the alien was probably made of antimatter. If not, then you can proceed to take it to your leader." From Death by Black Hole, p. 107.

Author's Note

I included citations for each quote because I prefer research to reassurance, and want to give you primary sources for this stuff -- and our man NDT has been intentionally misquoted before. Check out his books and movies and audiobooks for top-notch science content. And stay tuned for his Cosmos sequel.

All photos courtesy of iStock (unless otherwise noted) 

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Eclipses Belong to Families That Span Millennia
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If you’re lucky enough to see the solar eclipse when it passes over America on August 21, you’ll bear witness to a centuries-long legacy. That’s because total eclipses of the sun aren’t isolated incidents that occur at random. They belong to interconnected eclipse families that humans have been using to track the phenomena since long before the first telescope was invented.

In the latest installment of StarTalk on Mashable, Neil deGrasse Tyson chats with meteorologist Joe Rao about the science behind eclipse families. According to Rao, eclipses follow Saros cycles which repeat every 18 years, 11 days, 8 hours. Astronomers keep track of many different Saros cycles. The eclipse on August 21, for example, is a member of the family Solar Saros 145. Every 18 years a Saros 145 eclipse falls over a different third of the Earth. In 1999, the great American eclipse’s “cousin” appeared in the skies over Europe and south Asia, and 18 years before that another relative could be seen over modern Russia. The Solar Saros clan can be traced all the way back to 1639 and it will keep going until 3009.

Today, scientists have space-age technology that allows them to track the moment of totality down to a fraction of a second. But thousands of years ago, before such satellite-tracking equipment was invented, ancient Babylonians only knew what they could observe from Earth. Their eclipse calculations ended up serving them pretty well: They were able to predict the same 18-year cycle we know to be true today.

Saros 145 isn’t the only family of eclipses making its way around the Earth. There are enough solar eclipse cycles to make the event a fairly common occurrence. If you’re curious to see how many will happen in your lifetime, here’s where you can calculate the number.

[h/t Mashable]

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7 Maps of Fun Eclipse Viewing Locations
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Do you have your protective glasses and camera filter ready for the great American solar eclipse on August 21? Perfect. Now all you need to do is pick the ideal location for scoping out the event. Fortunately, the path of totality (the area from which the moon’s total coverage of the sun is visible) stretches from Oregon to South Carolina, and there are plenty of places in between where you can set up camp. We’ve tracked down maps of some of the most unique locations that will fall beneath the moon’s shadow on Monday.

1. WATCH FROM A NATIONAL PARK.

What better place to witness one of the most stunning events in nature than from a national park? Using data from NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio, the National Park Service has published a map of sites that will provide the best views of the celestial show. Several locations, from Great Smoky Mountains National Park in the East to John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in the West, fall in the path of totality. Click any marker in the interactive map to see if that place is hosting viewing events or other eclipse-related activities on August 21.

2. WATCH FROM THE CLOUDS.

When viewed from Earth, a total eclipse lasts only a few minutes. One way to get the most out of the experience is to head into the sky. You don’t need to board an invitation-only flight to see the eclipse from a bird's-eye perspective. There are plenty of airports in the path of totality, and NASA has compiled them all into a helpful map. In addition to choosing your departure and arrival points carefully, you’ll need to get the timing right. According to The Points Guy, taking an eastbound flight from a Pacific Northwest airport around 9 a.m., or a Denver, Colorado area airport around 10 a.m. will put you in a golden position for eclipse chasing—that’s assuming you can book a last-minute flight.

3. WATCH FROM A WAFFLE HOUSE.

On August 21, many Waffle House patrons will be treated to a mind-blowing experience—and we’re not talking about the topped and smothered hashbrowns. During the eclipse’s final hours it will be visible from dozens of Waffle Houses in the southern U.S. To choose a restaurant for viewing, refer to this map of Waffle Houses in the path of totality, put together by University of Georgia assistant geography professor Jerry Shannon. (He also tried making an eclipse map of Tim Hortons locations, but sadly fans of the Canadian chain won’t be so lucky.)

4. WATCH WHILE EATING FRIED CHICKEN.

Want some chicken to go with your waffles? Eclipse gazers watching from the southern states should have no trouble doing that. Twitter user Taber Andrew Bain made this map of fast food chicken joints that intersect with the path of totality. Bojangles' represents a healthy portion of the spots with 86 locations in the strip, but Zaxby’s is the most abundant by far with 117.

5. WATCH WITH WILDLIFE.

One of the more bizarre side effects of a solar eclipse is the reaction animals have to the sudden darkness. As most creatures time their habits to the rising and setting of the sun, totality can prompt different species to wake up, prepare for sleep, or just go berserk. We recommend watching this bizarre behavior with something separating you from the animals. NASA published a handy map of zoos that fall in the eclipse zone where you can do just that.

6. WATCH WITH SASQUATCH.

It’s not every day a solar eclipse occurs in your backyard, and it’s definitely not every day that you get to watch it in the company of Bigfoot. This map from cartographer and data visualization guru Joshua Stevens plots reported Sasquatch sightings in relation to the trajectory of the solar eclipse. It’s too bad that a bona fide Bigfoot encounter is a lot less likely to happen than a total solar eclipse—and even if you do spot the hairy guy on the big day, it might be hard to convince others of The X-Files-worthy coincidence.

7. WATCH FROM A LIBRARY.

Map of libraries hosting eclipse viewing events.
STAR_Net's NASA@ My Library initiative, Space Science Institute, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, NASA, and Google.

Your local library isn’t just a great place to pick up free protective glasses leading up to the eclipse. It can also be a fun spot to witness the event itself. Libraries around the country are hosting viewing events on the day of, where visitors will be provided with the proper equipment and information about what they’re seeing. Check out NASA’s map of libraries organizing such programs to find one close to you.

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