CLOSE

The Late Movies: Dogs on Wheels

Over the summer, my dog had an accident in which a rear leg was so damaged that it had to be amputated. Before you knew it, she was back running around the neighborhood and we had to restrain her too allow her stump to completely heal. Dogs are plenty resilient, even if they lose more than one leg. But human intervention in the form of wheels can give a disabled dog the freedom to run and play and do dog things. Watch these dogs go!

Oscar

Oscar was rescued from the streets and his back legs don't work, so he gets around on a set of wheels.
*

Roosevelt

Roosevelt is a border collie with deformed front legs. With a set of wheels, he runs as fast as he wants.
*

Popeye

Popeye is missing his rear legs. Watch him run and play with other dogs!
*

Angel

Angel the dachshund got her wheels about fifteen years ago, and this report made the news.
*

Sugar

This poodle suffered a back injury, but embraced life on wheels afterward. She lived for five years after this video was made.
*

Chanty

Chanty the chihuahua was a rescue dog, with a new lease on life thanks to her wheels.
*

Gary

Gary's wheels are meant to be temporary, as he suffered a stroke and is learning to walk again.
*

Lucie

Lucie was hit by a car and left to die in Puerto Rico. A family in New Hampshire took her in and gave her wheels.
*

Beatnik

Beatnik the chihuahua is missing his front legs, but wheels are all he needs!
*

Original image
iStock
arrow
Animals
Miami to Host Inaugural Canine Film Festival
Original image
iStock

There’s an annual festival dedicated to internet cat videos, so it only makes sense that dog-lovers would create their own film event. As the Miami New-Times reports, the Magic City will host the inaugural Canine Film Festival on July 15 and 16. The fundraising event encourages movie lovers to enjoy submitted flicks with their furry friends.

The festival will take place at the Cinépolis Coconut Grove and Hotel Indigo in Miami Lakes. Festivities kick off on the first day with “A Day at the Movies With Your Dog,” featuring film screenings attended by dogs and humans alike. Other events scheduled throughout the weekend include a dog fashion show, dog yoga, silent auctions, a canine costume contest, an after-party at Miami Lakes' Hotel Indigo, and an awards ceremony.

Admission costs $10 to $1000, and 50 percent of ticket proceeds will benefit local animal rescues and shelters. For more information, visit the Canine Film Festival's website.

[h/t Miami New Times]

Original image
iStock
arrow
Big Questions
Why Do Dogs Howl at Sirens?
Original image
iStock

A dog's behavior can often prove confusing to their human colleagues. We know they like to eat their own poop, but puzzle at their motivations. We're surprised when dogs give a ladybug the same greeting as a home intruder.

Topping the list of eccentric canine behavior: Why do dogs howl at sirens? Is there some genetic predisposition to responding to a high-pitched alarm from passing ambulances or police vehicles?

As it turns out, the reason dogs howl at sirens is because of their ancestry—namely, the wolf. When members of a pack are fractured and spread out, their companions will howl to provide a way of locating them. Think of it as nature’s GPS: By howling, dogs are able to communicate their respective locations to one another, even across long distances.

Since dogs really don’t know what a cop car is supposed to sound like, they’ll often interpret a siren as an animal’s howl. It’s also possible that dogs consider sirens to be a sign that something is abnormal in their environment, and that they want you, the pack leader, to be aware of it.

Contrary to belief, a dog is rarely howling because the noise hurts their delicate ears. If that were the case, some experts say, then they would display other behaviors, like running and hiding.

The more a dog hears and responds to a siren, the more they might be compelled to continue the behavior. That’s because dogs who howl and then notice the sound drifting away might begin to associate their vocalizing with the disappearance of the noise. In the future, they’ll probably recall that they “drove” the interloper away with their warbling and repeat the process.

While howling is usually harmless, sometimes it can be a sign that your pet is feeling separation anxiety from an owner or that they’re feeling unwell. If howling persists even without a screaming siren within earshot, you might consider taking them in for a check-up.

If you’ve wondered why dogs howl at sirens, now you know. It’s simply a way of signaling their location and not because it pains them. Owners, on the other hand, might feel differently.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios