Weekend Links: A Shark Drops In On a Golf Course

How To Be Good At Knives: Instant slicing and dicing mastery in one handy graphic guide. Y'all have no idea how much I needed this ….
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Really interesting piece about fact-checking at The New Yorker (sort of a "how stuff works" look into it).
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A list of banned words -- click on the year for the reasons (though you can probably guess most). On the flip side, here are some of (reportedly) the most beautiful English words.
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The Turritopsis nutricula jellyfish has displayed a remarkable ability to regenerate its cells in times of crisis, making it practically immortal (don't tell Voldemort ...)
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"What makes a golf story worth reading? A leopard shark falling from the sky onto the course."
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A "push to add drama" button has fantastically unexpected and entertaining results (one of the best marketing moves I've ever seen).
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There's really not much more to say about this than: amazing juggling. Call a spade a spade (update: io9 is on a backup site because of Sandy, the direct link may not work right away, but check out their other cool stuff in the meantime!)
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Always handy: Nine ways to make your cell phone last the whole storm even if the power goes out.
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Pretty cool, Wil Wheaton posted this up on Twitter the other day: "Electric Bob's Big Black Ostrich" from 1893 (from the New York Five Cent Library) is a prime example of the proto-steampunk genre known as the Edisonade (filed under "Today I learned …").
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Thanks to everyone who sent in links this week -- keep it up! Send your finds to FlossyLinks@gmail.com.

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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