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18 Wonderful Pictures from Halloween-Themed Weddings

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While many girls dream of a sunny, summer wedding, there are plenty of less-traditional gals out there who want a darker and spookier ceremony. For those brides-to-be, October is the perfect time to tie the knot. Here are a few fun photos from a number of Halloween-themed weddings.

The Invitations

Image courtesy of Flickr user nyballadeer.

Save-the-dates are the first impression guests get of a wedding, so by sending out spooky Ouija invites, Derek and Joey made sure their guests knew what sort of thrills were in store for the big day.


Images courtesy of Calla Evans.

Similarly, Alex and Kim’s comic book wedding programs set the mood for an adorable, but slightly dark day of romance.

The Decorations


Image courtesy of Flickr user batwife.

Naturally, the décor for most Halloween weddings features a few carved pumpkins, but this “Halloween Wedding” pumpkin goes above and beyond a typical jack-o-lantern and, as you can tell by this guest’s expression, the effort was certainly appreciated.

Balancing elegance with Halloween fun can be difficult, but it’s something Brett and Kimberly Koppen did an excellent job with when they put together the look of their reception tables.

When it comes to creating the perfect wedding favors for a Halloween wedding, Jesse and Moselle did a great job by selecting shot glasses with skulls and crossbones, the couple’s name and “’til death do us part” painted on them. As if that weren’t enough, they filled each glass with a tulle bag stuffed with Halloween candies.

Gothicly Glorious Fashion

One of the greatest things about having a Halloween wedding is that any outfit you choose to wear will be appropriate for the occasion. As someone who has dreamed of wearing a wedding dress since I saw Beetlejuice at 6 years old, I must say that I couldn’t be more fond of Flickr user shevavanname’s gorgeous gown.

While I’ve always wanted a red dress myself, I think Danielle’s lovely striped Victorian gown—with matching mini-top hat—is equally stunning and certainly just as Beetlejuice-esque, a style that fits in well with a Halloween wedding.

When it comes to non-traditional wedding looks though, Carmen and Darryl take the cake with their goth fairy and Day of the Dead looks. Of course, it didn’t hurt that they were married in the hub of non-traditional weddings, Las Vegas.

With a splash of orange and blue, Amanda and Justin did a great job balancing out traditional wedding looks with Halloween-inspired colors. The result ended up highlighting the season without washing away the importance of ceremony.


Image courtesy of Flickr user Jack Satta.

Of course, some couples still stick with the traditional wedding garb, but a small accessory can go a long way in setting the mood for a Halloween wedding. This particular couple, Kristen and Rhys, even met at a Halloween party where they were both dressed as pirates, so the eye patches and the wedding date both tie in nicely with their romantic tale.

Festive Guests

While some couples who get married on Halloween ask their guests to dress conventionally for a wedding, others encourage costumes. The great thing about costumed wedding guests is that you never know who will show up at the ceremony. For example, Jack and Sally from The Nightmare Before Christmas may be anxiously waiting to catch a glimpse of the bride like they were at Michelle Souliere’s wedding.

If your guests are coming in costume, you might as well have some fun with your photos. That’s why these guest mugshots at Melissa and James’ reception were so popular.


Image courtesy of Sarah Giffrow Creative’s Flickr stream.

Of course, just seeing groups of revelers together in such a variety of costumes will make any wedding photo more fun. For further proof, just witness the conga line at Alyson and Jeff’s wedding.

Sweet and Spooky Cakes

One of the highlights of any good wedding is the cake—and it should come as no surprise that cakes at Halloween weddings tend to be even more delightfully creative than most traditional ones. As a matter of fact, I was a bridesmaid at this particular Halloween wedding and, while the entire thing was delightful and the bride looked simply stunning, I still think this Corpse Bride cake was one of the most memorable things about the evening.

Image courtesy of The_Original_GirlWho’s Flickr stream.

For those who prefer their baked goods to have a little more of a retro vibe, this cute rockabilly cake might be more your style.

Image courtesy of JMC_artist’s Flickr stream.

For those that don’t care about the cake itself so much as the cake topper, it’s hard to beat Gamera and Godzilla—at least not when it comes to goofy and fun Halloween weddings.

As if the haunted house cake weren’t fun enough on its own, the image of Jim and Darcy cutting it while dressed as a police officer and a convict manages to perfectly summarize why Halloween weddings are so fun and memorable.

So have any of you ever been to a Halloween wedding? If so, did they do anything fun or unique to celebrate the holiday or was it a more traditional affair?

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technology
AI Algorithm Tells You the Ingredients in Your Meal Based on a Picture
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Your food photography habit could soon be good for more than just updating your Instagram. As Gizmodo reports, a new AI algorithm is trained to analyze food photos and match them with a list of ingredients and recipes.

The tool was developed by researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). To build it, they compiled information from sites like All Recipes and Food.com into a database dubbed Recipe1M, according to their paper. With more than a million annotated recipes at its disposal, a neural network then sifted through each one, learning about which ingredients are associated with which types of images along the way.

The result is Pic2Recipe, an algorithm that can deduce key details about a food item just by looking at its picture. Show it a picture of a cookie, for example, and it will tell you it likely contains sugar, butter, eggs, and flour. It will also recommend recipes for something similar pulled from the Recipe1M database.

Pic2Recipe is still a work in progress. While it has had success with simple recipes, more complicated items—like smoothies or sushi rolls, for example—seem to confuse the system. Overall, it suggests recipes with an accuracy rate of about 65 percent.

Researchers see their creation being used as a recipe search engine or as a tool for situations where nutritional information is lacking. “If you know what ingredients went into a dish but not the amount, you can take a photo, enter the ingredients, and run the model to find a similar recipe with known quantities, and then use that information to approximate your own meal,” lead author Nick Hynes told MIT News.

Before taking the project any further, the team plans to present its work at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference in Honolulu later this month.

[h/t Gizmodo]

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Health
UV Photos Show the Areas We Miss When Applying Sunscreen
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Sunscreen only works if you're actually wearing it. And it's too easy to go through the motions of putting on sunscreen while still leaving large amounts of skin unprotected. Even if you're applying the recommended shot glass of sunscreen before you head out into the world, parts of your skin may still be exposed to harmful rays. Just check out these UV images taken by researchers at the University of Liverpool, spotted by the UK's Metro.

The black-and-white images were taken with a UV camera so that any part of the skin covered by UV-blocking sunscreen would appear dark. Skin without sunscreen on it, by contrast, remains visible. The 57 volunteers in the study—which was recently presented at the British Association of Dermatologists' Annual Conference—were instructed to apply sunscreen to their face as usual.

A black-and-white UV photo of a woman’s blotchy sunscreen application

Some volunteers were more thorough than others, but as a whole, the group ended up missing a median of 9.5 percent of their faces. Men with beards tended to miss a lot of their faces, you might notice in the photos, and people seemed to have trouble with covering the full area around their mouth. However, the main problems occurred around the eyes. Many people missed their eyelids, and more than three-quarters of the group missed the medial canthal region, or the area between the bridge of the nose and the inner corner of the eye.

A UV photo of a man shows white patches of bare skin underneath dark-looking sunscreen.

The finding is significant because the area around the eyes are particularly susceptible to skin cancer. According to the abstract presented at the conference, 5 to 10 percent of skin cancers occur on the eyelids.

Knowing this doesn't necessarily help, though. When the participants were brought back for a second visit, the researchers gave them new instructions that included data on cancer risks for eyelids, the results barely changed. People put slightly more sunscreen on around their eyelids (they missed a median 7.7 percent instead of 13.5 percent of the area) but almost everyone still missed their medial canthal area.

A woman turns her face to show sunscreen coverage in a UV image.

It's not a surprising finding, considering the fact that no one wants to get sunscreen in their eyes. Sunscreen manufacturers recommend that you keep it out of your eyes, and if it does run, you'll end up in tears. So it's not particularly useful to tell people they should be coating their eyelids in Coppertone.

To keep your face super smooth and reduce your likelihood of sun damage, then, the message is clear. Better get some shades, unless you've got a UV-blocking eyeshadow on hand. Better yet, get yourself a hat, too.

[h/t Metro]

All images by Kareem Hassanin, courtesy Kevin Hamill

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