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18 Wonderful Pictures from Halloween-Themed Weddings

While many girls dream of a sunny, summer wedding, there are plenty of less-traditional gals out there who want a darker and spookier ceremony. For those brides-to-be, October is the perfect time to tie the knot. Here are a few fun photos from a number of Halloween-themed weddings.

The Invitations

Image courtesy of Flickr user nyballadeer.

Save-the-dates are the first impression guests get of a wedding, so by sending out spooky Ouija invites, Derek and Joey made sure their guests knew what sort of thrills were in store for the big day.


Images courtesy of Calla Evans.

Similarly, Alex and Kim’s comic book wedding programs set the mood for an adorable, but slightly dark day of romance.

The Decorations


Image courtesy of Flickr user batwife.

Naturally, the décor for most Halloween weddings features a few carved pumpkins, but this “Halloween Wedding” pumpkin goes above and beyond a typical jack-o-lantern and, as you can tell by this guest’s expression, the effort was certainly appreciated.

Balancing elegance with Halloween fun can be difficult, but it’s something Brett and Kimberly Koppen did an excellent job with when they put together the look of their reception tables.

When it comes to creating the perfect wedding favors for a Halloween wedding, Jesse and Moselle did a great job by selecting shot glasses with skulls and crossbones, the couple’s name and “’til death do us part” painted on them. As if that weren’t enough, they filled each glass with a tulle bag stuffed with Halloween candies.

Gothicly Glorious Fashion

One of the greatest things about having a Halloween wedding is that any outfit you choose to wear will be appropriate for the occasion. As someone who has dreamed of wearing a wedding dress since I saw Beetlejuice at 6 years old, I must say that I couldn’t be more fond of Flickr user shevavanname’s gorgeous gown.

While I’ve always wanted a red dress myself, I think Danielle’s lovely striped Victorian gown—with matching mini-top hat—is equally stunning and certainly just as Beetlejuice-esque, a style that fits in well with a Halloween wedding.

When it comes to non-traditional wedding looks though, Carmen and Darryl take the cake with their goth fairy and Day of the Dead looks. Of course, it didn’t hurt that they were married in the hub of non-traditional weddings, Las Vegas.

With a splash of orange and blue, Amanda and Justin did a great job balancing out traditional wedding looks with Halloween-inspired colors. The result ended up highlighting the season without washing away the importance of ceremony.


Image courtesy of Flickr user Jack Satta.

Of course, some couples still stick with the traditional wedding garb, but a small accessory can go a long way in setting the mood for a Halloween wedding. This particular couple, Kristen and Rhys, even met at a Halloween party where they were both dressed as pirates, so the eye patches and the wedding date both tie in nicely with their romantic tale.

Festive Guests

While some couples who get married on Halloween ask their guests to dress conventionally for a wedding, others encourage costumes. The great thing about costumed wedding guests is that you never know who will show up at the ceremony. For example, Jack and Sally from The Nightmare Before Christmas may be anxiously waiting to catch a glimpse of the bride like they were at Michelle Souliere’s wedding.

If your guests are coming in costume, you might as well have some fun with your photos. That’s why these guest mugshots at Melissa and James’ reception were so popular.


Image courtesy of Sarah Giffrow Creative’s Flickr stream.

Of course, just seeing groups of revelers together in such a variety of costumes will make any wedding photo more fun. For further proof, just witness the conga line at Alyson and Jeff’s wedding.

Sweet and Spooky Cakes

One of the highlights of any good wedding is the cake—and it should come as no surprise that cakes at Halloween weddings tend to be even more delightfully creative than most traditional ones. As a matter of fact, I was a bridesmaid at this particular Halloween wedding and, while the entire thing was delightful and the bride looked simply stunning, I still think this Corpse Bride cake was one of the most memorable things about the evening.

Image courtesy of The_Original_GirlWho’s Flickr stream.

For those who prefer their baked goods to have a little more of a retro vibe, this cute rockabilly cake might be more your style.

Image courtesy of JMC_artist’s Flickr stream.

For those that don’t care about the cake itself so much as the cake topper, it’s hard to beat Gamera and Godzilla—at least not when it comes to goofy and fun Halloween weddings.

As if the haunted house cake weren’t fun enough on its own, the image of Jim and Darcy cutting it while dressed as a police officer and a convict manages to perfectly summarize why Halloween weddings are so fun and memorable.

So have any of you ever been to a Halloween wedding? If so, did they do anything fun or unique to celebrate the holiday or was it a more traditional affair?

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Harry Trimble
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Design
Delightful Photo Series Celebrates Britain’s Municipal Trash Cans
Harry Trimble
Harry Trimble

Not all trash cans are alike. In the UK, few know this better than Harry Trimble, the brains behind #govbins, a photo project that aims to catalog all the trash can designs used by local governments across Britain.

Trimble, a 29-year-old designer based in South London, began the series in 2016, when he noticed the variation in trash can design across the cities he visited in the UK. While most bins are similar sizes and shapes, cities make trash cans their own with unique graphics and unusual colors. He started to photograph the cans he happened to see day-to-day, but the project soon morphed beyond that. Now, he tries to photograph at least one new bin a week.

A bright blue trash can reads ‘Knowsley Council: Recycle for Knowsley.’
Knowsley Village, England

“I got impatient,” Trimble says in an email to Mental Floss. “Now there’s increasingly more little detours and day trips” to track down new bin designs, he says, “which my friends, family and workmates patiently let me drag them on.” He has even pulled over on the road just to capture a new bin he spotted.

So far, he’s found cans that are blue, green, brown, black, gray, maroon, purple, and red. Some are only one color, while others feature lids of a different shade than the body of the can. Some look very modern, with minimalist logos and city website addresses, Trimble describes, “while others look all stately with coats of arms and crests of mythical creatures.”

A black trash can features an 'H' logo.
Hertsmere, England

A blue trash can reads ‘South Ribble Borough Council: Forward with South Ribble.’
South Ribble, England

A green trash can with a crest reads ‘Trafford Council: Food and Garden Waste Only.’
Trafford, Greater Manchester, England

Trimble began putting his images up online in 2017, and recently started an Instagram to show off his finds.

For now, he’s “more than managing” his one-can-a-week goal. See the whole series at govbins.uk.

All images by Harry Trimble

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Art
5 Things You Might Not Know About Ansel Adams

You probably know Ansel Adams—who was born on February 20, 1902—as the man who helped promote the National Park Service through his magnificent photographs. But there was a lot more to the shutterbug than his iconic, black-and-white vistas. Here are five lesser-known facts about the celebrated photographer.

1. AN EARTHQUAKE LED TO HIS DISTINCTIVE NOSE.

Adams was a four-year-old tot when the 1906 San Francisco earthquake struck his hometown. Although the boy managed to escape injury during the quake itself, an aftershock threw him face-first into a garden wall, breaking his nose. According to a 1979 interview with TIME, Adams said that doctors told his parents that it would be best to fix the nose when the boy matured. He joked, "But of course I never did mature, so I still have the nose." The nose became Adams' most striking physical feature. His buddy Cedric Wright liked to refer to Adams' honker as his "earthquake nose.

2. HE ALMOST BECAME A PIANIST.

Adams was an energetic, inattentive student, and that trait coupled with a possible case of dyslexia earned him the heave-ho from private schools. It was clear, however, that he was a sharp boy—when motivated.

When Adams was just 12 years old, he taught himself to play the piano and read music, and he quickly showed a great aptitude for it. For nearly a dozen years, Adams focused intensely on his piano training. He was still playful—he would end performances by jumping up and sitting on his piano—but he took his musical education seriously. Adams ultimately devoted over a decade to his study, but he eventually came to the realization that his hands simply weren't big enough for him to become a professional concert pianist. He decided to leave the keys for the camera after meeting photographer Paul Strand, much to his family's dismay.

3. HE HELPED CREATE A NATIONAL PARK.

If you've ever enjoyed Kings Canyon National Park in California, tip your cap to Adams. In the 1930s Adams took a series of photographs that eventually became the book Sierra Nevada: The John Muir Trail. When Adams sent a copy to Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, the cabinet member showed it to Franklin Roosevelt. The photographs so delighted FDR that he wouldn't give the book back to Ickes. Adams sent Ickes a replacement copy, and FDR kept his with him in the White House.

After a few years, Ickes, Adams, and the Sierra Club successfully convinced Roosevelt to make Kings Canyon a national park in 1940. Roosevelt's designation specifically provided that the park be left totally undeveloped and roadless, so the only way FDR himself would ever experience it was through Adams' lenses.

4. HE WELCOMED COMMERCIAL ASSIGNMENTS.

While many of his contemporary fine art photographers shunned commercial assignments as crass or materialistic, Adams went out of his way to find paying gigs. If a company needed a camera for hire, Adams would generally show up, and as a result, he had some unlikely clients. According to The Ansel Adams Gallery, he snapped shots for everyone from IBM to AT&T to women's colleges to a dried fruit company. All of this commercial print work dismayed Adams's mentor Alfred Stieglitz and even worried Adams when he couldn't find time to work on his own projects. It did, however, keep the lights on.

5. HE AND GEORGIA O'KEEFFE WERE FRIENDS.

Adams and legendary painter O'Keeffe were pals and occasional traveling buddies who found common ground despite their very different artistic approaches. They met through their mutual friend/mentor Stieglitz—who eventually became O'Keeffe's husband—and became friends who traveled throughout the Southwest together during the 1930s. O'Keeffe would paint while Adams took photographs.

These journeys together led to some of the artists' best-known work, like Adams' portrait of O'Keeffe and a wrangler named Orville Cox, and while both artists revered nature and the American Southwest, Adams considered O'Keeffe the master when it came to capturing the area. 

“The Southwest is O’Keeffe’s land,” he wrote. “No one else has extracted from it such a style and color, or has revealed the essential forms so beautifully as she has in her paintings.”

The two remained close throughout their lives. Adams would visit O'Keeffe's ranch, and the two wrote to each other until Adams' death in 1984.

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