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Slow, but Scary, Killer Snails

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Wikimedia Commons

The killers in some classic slasher movies are notoriously slow. Jason Voorhees, Michael Myers, and Leatherface all shamble along at a pace that makes little old ladies look like Usain Bolt. It’s got to be frustrating for someone with murder on their mind to get outrun by their victims. But real-world slow-and-scaries, the predatory cone snails of the genus Conus, have evolved a frightening way to make up for their speed deficit: venomous, harpoon-like teeth that can stab prey and drag them to the snail.

The snails bury themselves in the sand and lie in wait or sneak up on their prey, using a specialized chemical-sensory organ to detect a meal. Once a victim is in range, the snail strikes. It points its long, flexible proboscis at its victim and launches a modified radular tooth—hollow, barbed and made of chitin—from it. The tooth is loaded with a cocktail of neurotoxins that reduce pain to pacify the prey and quickly paralyze it by blocking neurotransmitter receptors. The tooth is still attached to the radula structure, so once the prey is subdued, the snail draws both the tooth and its dinner right into its mouth. After the meal has been processed, the snail pukes up any leftover indigestible bits along with the used tooth, and readies another one to fire. You can see the a snail do the jab-and-grab and then swallow a fish whole in this National Geographic video.

The snail’s venom gland and the toxins it makes have fascinated scientists for more than a century. A researcher from Canada’s University of Victoria recently discovered that the venom glands of the species C. lividus come from a bit of “epithelial [tissue] remodeling” and are formed when a part of the esophagus pinches off as the snail transitions into adulthood. The researcher suggests that this tissue tweaking process allowed the snail to develop its weaponry and become carnivorous in a relatively short evolutionary timeframe.

Meanwhile, the speed and precision of the snails’ venom have led other researchers to look into it for medical use as a painkiller with few or no side effects. One painkiller derived from the snails’ arsenal has already been approved by the FDA. “Prialt” contains ziconotide, a synthetic equivalent of one of the snails’ many toxins, and is approved for use in treating chronic pain in patients with cancer and AIDS. Dozens of other cone snail toxins are still being investigated for use in pain relief and treating epilepsy, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other diseases and disorders.

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The Delicious Chemistry of Sushi
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iStock

The secret to sushi's delicious taste is invisible to the human eye. Chefs spend years training to properly prepare the Japanese culinary staple, which consists of fresh fish and seasoned rice, either served together or wrapped in seaweed. At its most elemental, as the American Chemistry Society's latest Reactions video explains below, the bite-sized morsels contain an assortment of compounds that, together, combine to form a perfectly balanced mix of savory and sweet. They include mannitol, iodine, and bromophenol, all of which provide a distinctive tang; and glutamate, which adds a savory, rich umami flavor (and turns into MSG when it's combined with a sodium ion).

Take a bite of science, and learn more fun facts about the Japanese culinary staple's long history and unique preparation method by watching the video below.

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Courtesy the University of Colorado Boulder
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Fossilized Poop Shows Some Herbivorous Dinosaurs Loved a Good Crab Dinner
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Lead author Karen Chin of the University of Colorado Boulder
Courtesy the University of Colorado Boulder

Scientists can learn a lot about the prehistoric world through very, very old poop. Just recently, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder and Kent State University studying fossilized dinosaur poop discovered that some herbivores weren't as picky about their diets as we thought. Though they mostly ate plants, large dinosaurs living in Utah 75 million years ago also seem to have eaten prehistoric crustaceans, as Nature News reports.

The new study, published in Scientific Reports, finds that large dinosaurs of the Late Cretaceous period seem to have eaten crabs, along with rotting wood, based on the content of their coprolites (the more scientific term for prehistoric No. 2). The fossilized remains of dinos' bathroom activities were found in the Kaiparowits rock formation in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, a known hotspot for pristine Late Cretaceous fossils.

"The large size and woody contents" of the poop suggest that they were created by dinosaurs that were well-equipped to process fiber in their diets, as the study puts it, leading the researchers to suggest that the poop came from big herbivores like hadrosaurs, whose remains have been found in the area before.

Close up scientific images of evidence of crustaceans in fossilized poop.
Chin et al., Scientific Reports (2017)

While scientists previously thought that plant-eating dinosaurs like hadrosaurs only ate vegetation, these findings suggest otherwise. "The diet represented by the Kaiparowits coprolites would have provided a woody stew of plant, fungal, and invertebrate tissues," the researchers write, including crabs (Yum.) These crustaceans would have provided a big source of calcium for the dinosaurs, and the other invertebrates that no doubt lived in the rotting logs would have provided a good source of protein.

But they probably didn't eat the rotting wood all year, instead munching on dead trees seasonally or during times when other food sources weren’t available. Another hypothesis is that these "ancient fecal producers," as the researchers call them, might have eaten the rotting wood, with its calcium-rich crustaceans and protein-laden invertebrates, during egg production, similar to the feeding patterns of modern birds during breeding season.

Regardless of the reason, these findings could change how we think about what big dinosaurs ate.

[h/t Nature News]

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