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The Missing Links: Grand Theft Space Shuttle

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Getty Images

Selling Your Body To Science - While You’re Still Living

Writer and 30 Rock cast member John Lutz (he's the one on the left) has done just that, and is writing a book about his experience.

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In the Land Before Color Photography...
Everyone was super weird and creepy.

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Have A Laugh At Laughter’s Expense
The incredibly funny writer Colin Nissan offers up a piece on the world’s greatest medicine.

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Can You Hear Me Now?
If you’re moving faster than the speed of sound, can you hear yourself scream?

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A Metropolis Made From Bill Cosby’s Favorite Jiggly Dessert Treat
What’s this city called? Jell-Oakland? Jel-Lower Manhattan? Or is this the capital of GelaTennessee? OK, I’m done.

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Have You Heard About These Gigantic Hogwarts-Style Tree Houses?
JK Rowling’s neighbors have, and they don’t like it.

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Do You Want to Steal An Actual NASA Space Shuttle?
Well, you’re going to need a plan.

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STD Cupcake Anyone?
This bake shop specializes in churning out the most heinous looking treats you can imagine.

This place really reminds me of a sketch from the phenomenal but short-lived Upright Citizens Brigade series:

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History
The Queen of Code: Remembering Grace Hopper
By Lynn Gilbert, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Grace Hopper was a computing pioneer. She coined the term "computer bug" after finding a moth stuck inside Harvard's Mark II computer in 1947 (which in turn led to the term "debug," meaning solving problems in computer code). She did the foundational work that led to the COBOL programming language, used in mission-critical computing systems for decades (including today). She worked in World War II using very early computers to help end the war. When she retired from the U.S. Navy at age 79, she was the oldest active-duty commissioned officer in the service. Hopper, who was born on this day in 1906, is a hero of computing and a brilliant role model, but not many people know her story.

In this short documentary from FiveThirtyEight, directed by Gillian Jacobs, we learned about Grace Hopper from several biographers, archival photographs, and footage of her speaking in her later years. If you've never heard of Grace Hopper, or you're even vaguely interested in the history of computing or women in computing, this is a must-watch:

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science
Why Are Glaciers Blue?
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iStock

The bright azure blue sported by many glaciers is one of nature's most stunning hues. But how does it happen, when the snow we see is usually white? As Joe Hanson of It's Okay to Be Smart explains in the video below, the snow and ice we see mostly looks white, cloudy, or clear because all of the visible light striking its surface is reflected back to us. But glaciers have a totally different structure—their many layers of tightly compressed snow means light has to travel much further, and is scattered many times throughout the depths. As the light bounces around, the light at the red and yellow end of the spectrum gets absorbed thanks to the vibrations of the water molecules inside the ice, leaving only blue and green light behind. For the details of exactly why that happens, check out Hanson's trip to Alaska's beautiful (and endangered) Mendenhall Glacier below.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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