11 Disturbing Cakes That Look Like Body Parts

1. Heart

This might be the only cake here that works for both Halloween and Valentine’s Day. Of course, given the detail and realism in the design, created of Debbie Does Cakes, this heart might just scare off your potential love interest and leave you branded as a stalker, rather than a romancer. (Unless, of course, she's a fan of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.)

2. Lips with a Cold Sore

Tattoo Cakes makes plenty of those aforementioned naughty body part cakes, and it’s precisely their skills at depicting anatomy with cakes that allowed them to so perfectly recreate a realistic set of lips complete with a nasty cold sore.

3. Common Pathologies of the Breast

Similarly, most cakes featuring breasts are erotic, but not this one by Lou Lou P’s Delights that features some of the most common pathologies of the breast in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

4. Kidney Disease

If you think a diseased breast cupcake is disturbing, then you probably wouldn’t want to be the first one to cut this cake by Cakes by Victoria that demonstrates what Polycystic Kidney Disease looks like.

5. Worm-Infested Lungs

For those who prefer parasites over disease, these sliced open lungs filled with wriggling worms are a perfect alternative. It really is the addition of worms that makes this design by Tesoro Cookies cross over from kind of gross to utterly disgusting.

6. Severed Eye and Ear

If anything can compete with catching a disease or becoming infected with a parasite, it’s the idea of losing perfectly healthy body parts. That’s why these blood-spattered eye and ear cupcakes by The Butcher of Caker Street are so utterly spine chilling.

7. Eyeball

If an eyeball cupcake isn’t enough to get satiate you, then perhaps this giant eye, created by Cake Central user Estasrica, will be able to whet your appetite. The addition of both blood and pus makes this one a particularly nasty Halloween cake.

8. Liver, Stomach and Spleen

If you’ve only been reading this article because you desperately want an anatomy lesson, well, this properly labeled cake, by Cake Central user Hollep, is the closest you’re going to get. (Unfortunately, the angle of the photograph makes it nearly impossible to read some of the labels.)

9. Twins in the Womb

The great thing about eating this cake, made by Ele Cake Co and photographed by Chris Glass, is that you’re not only munching on an organ—you’re also enjoying a variety of body parts from three distinct individuals. Talk about getting more for your money!

10. Melting Head Cake

Of course, none of these cakes are worth losing your head over—that is, unless your head happens to be melting in a most horrific manner like this cake, featured on Do It Myself.

11. Thorax

If you have a hard time choosing between body parts or flavor combinations, then this thorax cake, also by Do It Myself, is certainly your best bet. Not only does it offer a variety of organs for you to enjoy, but, like a real human body, each piece tastes a little different: The heart is made with orange cake filled with raspberry sauce; the lungs are apple spice cake with strawberry sauce; the kidneys are orange cake with blueberry sauce; the stomach features ginger cake with mango sauce; the liver is chocolate with kiwi sauce; and the small intestine is a jelly roll filled with red currant jelly. I think I would reach for the kidneys and liver first—what about you?
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Would any of you actually eat these cakes? Or does the idea seem a bit too close to cannibalism for you? Let us know in the comments!

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'Lime Disease' Could Give You a Nasty Rash This Summer
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A cold Corona or virgin margarita is best enjoyed by the pool, but watch where you’re squeezing those limes. As Slate illustrates in a new video, there’s a lesser-known “lime disease,” and it can give you a nasty skin rash if you’re not careful.

When lime juice comes into contact with your skin and is then exposed to UV rays, it can cause a chemical reaction that results in phytophotodermatitis. It looks a little like a poison ivy reaction or sun poisoning, and some of the symptoms include redness, blistering, and inflammation. It’s the same reaction caused by a corrosive sap on the giant hogweed, an invasive weed that’s spreading throughout the U.S.

"Lime disease" may sound random, but it’s a lot more common than you might think. Dermatologist Barry D. Goldman tells Slate he sees cases of the skin condition almost daily in the summer. Some people have even reported receiving second-degree burns as a result of the citric acid from lime juice. According to the Mayo Clinic, the chemical that causes phytophotodermatitis can also be found in wild parsnip, wild dill, wild parsley, buttercups, and other citrus fruits.

To play it safe, keep your limes confined to the great indoors or wash your hands with soap after handling the fruit. You can learn more about phytophotodermatitis by checking out Slate’s video below.

[h/t Slate]

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Why Eating From a Smaller Plate Might Not Be an Effective Dieting Trick 
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It might be time to rewrite the diet books. Israeli psychologists have cast doubt on the widespread belief that eating from smaller plates helps you control food portions and feel fuller, Scientific American reports.

Past studies have shown that this mind trick, called the Delboeuf illusion, influences the amount of food that people eat. In one 2012 study, participants who were given larger bowls ended up eating more soup overall than those given smaller bowls.

However, researchers from Ben-Gurion University in Negev, Israel, concluded in a study published in the journal Appetite that the effectiveness of the illusion depends on how empty your stomach is. The team of scientists studied two groups of participants: one that ate three hours before the experiment, and another that ate one hour prior. When participants were shown images of pizzas on serving trays of varying sizes, the group that hadn’t eaten in several hours was more accurate in assessing the size of pizzas. In other words, the hungrier they were, the less likely they were to be fooled by the different trays.

However, both groups were equally tricked by the illusion when they were asked to estimate the size of non-food objects, such as black circles inside of white circles and hubcaps within tires. Researchers say this demonstrates that motivational factors, like appetite, affects how we perceive food. The findings also dovetail with the results of an earlier study, which concluded that overweight people are less likely to fall for the illusion than people of a normal weight.

So go ahead and get a large plate every now and then. At the very least, it may save you a second trip to the buffet table.

[h/t Scientific American]

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