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11 Foods Inspired by Candy Corn

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Whether or not you actually enjoy the flavor of candy corn, it’s hard to deny that its tri-color design has become a classic symbol of Halloween treats. It’s so iconic, in fact, the color combination can now be found in all kinds of foods, many of which even those who hate candy corn will still enjoy, like those limited edition Candy Corn Oreos.

1. Pudding

When Craftster user sweets4ever found out at the last minute that she had company coming over, she threw together these adorable candy corn puddings with a little instant vanilla pudding, some food coloring and some Cool Whip. The result was a delightfully festive and inviting dessert that took minutes to make.

2. Cocktails

Hate the taste of candy corn, but love tropical fruit flavors? Then this candy corn cocktail is for you. It's made with pineapple vodka, orange sherbet, pineapple juice, milk and simple syrup.

3. Jell-O Shots

If you like your drinks to jiggle a little, then perhaps you’d enjoy these candy corn Jell-O shots created by My Science Project. The white layer is unflavored Knox gelatin, sugar and coconut milk; the orange layer is a mix of orange Jell-O, butterscotch schnapps and orange sherbet; the yellow layer contains pineapple Jell-O and coconut milk; and all three flavors contain vanilla schnapps.

4. Cotton Candy

If you happen to be heading to Disneyland before Halloween, then don’t miss the opportunity to visit their Halloween carnival just behind Big Thunder Ranch. There you can not only take pictures with your favorite Disney villains, admire pumpkins carved by expert artists and play fun carnival games, but also buy yourself some candy corn cotton candy, which sounds so sweet that just saying it is liable to give you a cavity.

5. Cake Push Pops

All you need to make some candy corn push pops are plastic push pops (you can find them on Etsy or Amazon), some frosting, some food coloring and some white cake mix. It’s amazing how simple these treats are, given how impressive they look.

6. Bento Boxes

How do you make your kids a sandwich that looks like a piece of candy corn for their daily bento box? Just make a sandwich sans cheese and put a piece of provolone on top (your youngster can put the cheese in the middle at lunch time). Cut the sandwich into the right shape, use a food-safe marker to color the bottom of the provolone yellow, and put a small strip of cheddar in the middle. For the rest of the bento box, some baby carrots and real candy corn can round out the tasty lunchtime treat.

7. Rice Krispie Treats

To make these tasty treats, you’ll need to make three batches of Rice Krispie treats, dyeing the first one yellow, the next one orange, and leaving the last white. As each successive batch finishes, pack it in a cake pan, making an outer ring, then a smaller one next to that, until the white treats fill up the hole in the middle. Once they’re cool, cut in slices and enjoy your candy corn treats.

8. Fudge

Enjoy making and eating regular white chocolate fudge? Well, with a little food coloring and a bit of patience, you can easily convert your usual white fudge recipe into a tri-color masterpiece perfect for Halloween.

9. Marshmallows

Admittedly, most people think of marshmallows as a filling or topping for a real dessert, not a dessert on their own. But if you’ve ever had homemade marshmallows, then you know just how delicious they can be, and these candy corn mallows are sure to taste as good as they look.

10. Waffles

Spruce up the most important meal of the day with a little style. Like many of the other recipes listed here, all you need to impress your loved ones with this recipe is a little food coloring.

11. Milkshakes

These milkshakes are all vanilla with a little food coloring and layering, but if you were really so inspired, it would be easy to use sherbets in place of vanilla ice cream, creating a pineapple, orange and coconut milkshake in the process.

This story originally appeared last Halloween.

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Food
Drink Your Coffee Out of a Cup Made From Coffee Waste
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HuskeeCup

Your coffee habit isn’t exactly good for the environment. For one thing, 30 to 50 percent of the original coffee plant harvested (by weight) ends up as agricultural waste, and there aren’t many uses for coffee husks and pulp. While coffee pulp can be made into flour, and in Ethiopia husks are used to brew a type of coffee called bruno, typically most of the byproducts of your morning coffee go to waste.

Huskee has another use for coffee husks. The company makes stylish coffee cups, returning coffee back to its original home inside the husk, in a sense. The dishwasher-friendly and microwavable cups are made of husks from coffee farms in Yunnan, China. The material won’t burn your hands, but it keeps your coffee warm as well as a ceramic mug would.

A stack of black cups and saucers of various sizes on an espresso machine.
HuskeeCup

Designed for both home and restaurant use, the cups come in 6-ounce, 8-ounce, and 12-ounce sizes with saucers. The company is also working on a lid so that the cups can be used on the go.

Huskee estimates that a single coffee drinker is responsible for around 6.6 pounds of husk waste per year, which doesn’t sound like much until you begin to consider how many coffee lovers there are in the world. That’s somewhere around 1.49 million tons per year, according to the company. Though coffee husks are sometimes used for animal feed, we could use a few more ways to recycle them. And if it happens to be in the form of an attractive coffee mug, so be it.

A four-pack of cups is about $37 on Kickstarter. The product is scheduled to ship before February 2018.

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Big Questions
Jam vs. Jelly: What's the Difference?
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The language of fruit spreads is a peculiar one. Spreads made from the squeezed-out remnants of oranges, berries, grapes, and other mashed-up foods can easily be confused for one another, with jam vs. jelly being a particular source of befuddlement. Here’s how to keep them straight. 

Jelly is made solely from the juice of fruit. The fruit is crushed and strained, and the liquid extract is boiled with added sugar and pectin to produce a thick, spreadable topping. Jam is produced in a similar way, but with one important distinction: It’s not strained. The goop leaves in chunks of crushed fruit, giving the spread a more robust consistency. Because it’s already thick, preparations of jam typically don’t call for a whole lot of pectin. Think of it as the chunky peanut butter to jelly’s regular, even though you might not see whole pieces of fruit suspended in the product.

Sometimes people will call a spread a “fruit preserve.” While that might mean the fruit chunks are larger and more noticeable, that’s not always the case. You might also see marmalades that look suspiciously like jams. The distinction there is that marmalades are typically sourced from citrus fruits like oranges or lemons.

Things get a little trickier in the UK, where “jelly” can refer either to a fruit spread or to the gelatin concoction Jell-O. The country also has pretty strict standards for applying the jam label: Jams need to be a minimum of 60 percent sugar in order to earn that title. The rule was created in the 1920s so the spreads would have a longer shelf life. (Sugar, in this instance, acts as a preservative.) Reducing the amount of sugar, which has been discussed among people wishing to keep all of their teeth, might result in a longer boil process and some loss of flavor.

And what of fruit butters and conserves? Fruit butters are made using fruit pulp for thick spreads, but don’t actually contain any butter. Conserves add nuts or raisins for added texture. These rogue spreads aren’t as common as jelly or jam.

We hope this clears up any jam vs. jelly confusion and that you find yourself better-informed to deal with the next naked piece of toast you encounter.

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