Weekend Links: The Accuracy of an Internet Self-Diagnosis

The New Yorker's Atul Gawande shared a link for us self-diagnosers to consider: a study of Googling for medical advice reveals that in tests, 1/4 of sites offer outright wrong / unsafe information, and only 40% are indeed accurate.
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Who is better known, the world's most powerful woman, or a 90s sit-com character? It's Merkel vs. Urkel!
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"This video is eight and a half minutes long. It is also a beautifully shot, hypnotic look inside a DSLR lens, which is easily worth your time. Oh, and it’s a follow-along hack, too, if you have the guts."
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Not sure how to use a phone? This 1917 guide shows you how (I would say it's still necessary!)
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Inspiring profile piece on Edwina Grosvenor, the daughter of the Duke and Duchess of Westminster, "but rather than indulge in her wealth Edwina Grosvenor has dedicated herself to the often thankless task of prison reform."
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Settle in for this one (and prepare for some graphic depictions) a murder-suicide in the Keys unravels a doctor's decades-long mystery.
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I don't know what exactly this is because it's in Russian, but it's a lot of photoshopped photos that are worth a scroll.
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Another brain game: Einstein's Riddle Game of description and instructions. This is an oldie but goodie -- to win you need to put in all 25 correct answers.
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A big thanks to everyone who sent in links this week -- keep it up! Send your Flossy finds to FlossyLinks@gmail.com

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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Bone Collector
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